Excursions of Western Wall tunnels present new underground space in Jerusalem

Christian travelers visit Jerusalem to follow the last steps of Jesus along the Via Dolorosa, Muslims to worship the Dome of the Rock, and Jewish people to insert written prayers into the cracks of the Western Wall.

Some people do all three.

Starting in December, a new option will be available to travelers visiting Jerusalem. You can go underground to experience part of the old city as it existed about 2,000 years ago.

An underground building

After more than 150 years of excavation, a buried building erected around AD 20 is due to be opened to the public this year.

The underground building is just a few steps from the Western Wall, a retaining wall on the west side of the Temple Mount, the holiest site in Judaism and the site where Jerusalem’s first and second temples once stood.

About 10% of the original Western Wall is visible today, with most of them buried behind buildings in the Muslim quarter of the old town as well as underground.

EMMANUEL DUNAND | AFP | Getty Images

The Western Wall is also one of the top attractions for travelers to Israel. It drew 12 million visitors in 2019, said Eyal Carlin, the tourism commissioner for North America at Israel’s Ministry of Tourism.

The excavated area dates from the Second Temple period, originally built in the 6th century BC. And later by Herod the Great, who ruled Jerusalem from 37 to 34 BC. Ruled, was greatly expanded.

The new chambers are under Wilson’s Arch, an archway that once supported a bridge to the Second Temple, here in the lower left corner.

Christopher Chan | Moment | Getty Images

The building, which is about 15 meters underground, contains two underground chambers separated by corridors and a “magnificent” water fountain, according to the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), the government agency that oversees the country’s excavation projects. Once located on a road that led to the Temple Mount, the building is now buried deep underground, covered over by centuries of construction.

The new areas become part of the popular West wall tunnel Guided tours that run all day from Sunday to Thursday and Friday to noon.

What travelers can see

To access the new areas, visitors descend stairs that are like stepping back in time, Carlin told CNBC.

“When you dig down, you literally go through history,” said Carlin. “Each layer represents different parts of history and different centuries.”

Part of the steps used to reach the newly excavated areas.

Yaniv Berman, Israel Antiquities Authority

“You go back to the Ottoman period, the Muslim period, the time of the Crusaders … right up to the Herodian period,” he said, referring to the rule of King Herod and his heirs from 37 BC. Chr. To 73 AD

Support beams reinforce the corridor between the two chambers of the old underground building.

Yaniv Berman, Israel Antiquities Authority

Archaeologists knew a chamber existed, but excavations uncovered a larger building with two identical rooms separated by a courtyard.

The building could have been a city council building, said Shlomit Weksler-Bdolah, excavation director for the Israel Antiquities Agency, in a press release from the Israel Ministry of Tourism in August. She called the excavated area “one of the most magnificent Second Temple-era public buildings ever unearthed.”

One of two chambers in a building discovered outside the Western Wall.

Yaniv Berman, Israel Antiquities Authority

Historians believe the chambers were reception rooms for dignitaries, wealthy visitors, and members of the high priesthood, Carlin said.

They could also have been restaurants. Archaeologists believe that the rooms once contained couches on which one ate lying down, as was common in the Greek, Hellenistic, and Roman times, according to Weksler-Bdolah.

“It’s very opulent – they were big chambers with big decorative elements made of running water,” said Carlin. “It shows the prosperity of the area at the time … and the people who were welcomed there.”

The second excavated chamber, which is built with arched stone ceilings.

Yaniv Berman, Israel Antiquities Authority

Archaeologists found a small ritual cleaning pool called a mikveh, which priests and aristocrats likely used before visiting the Second Temple.

“Those are the steps that go down” into the pool, he said, which “would normally be filled with water drawn from springs”.

Steps leading to a purification basin, or mikvah, believed to have been added many years after the excavated building was constructed.

Yaniv Berman, Israel Antiquities Authority

The mikveh would not be open to the public, Carlin said. Members of the general public cleaned themselves in the pool at Siloam, which was about a third of a mile away. This is the same pool in which Jesus is said to have restored sight to a blind man, as mentioned in the Gospel of John in the Christian Bible.

The room with the mikveh is part of an “elite gate” to the Second Temple, said Eyal Carlin from the Israeli Ministry of Tourism.

Israel Antiquities Authority

Past the baths, visitors can see the foundation stones of the Western Wall, Carlin said. The stones are huge, weighing more than 250 tons.

Jerusalem is, at least in part, a city built on top of other cities. Existing buildings were turned into basements or underground living quarters for new buildings, according to an article in The times of Israel.

The hallways contained ornate pilasters or columns topped with Corinthian capitals into which water pipes were built.

Yaniv Berman, Israel Antiquities Authority

Therefore, parts of the underground buildings were found completely intact. Decorative elements “were found as a whole,” said Carlin. “There were parts that broke off, but the elements we see have not been reconstructed.”

Excavations are ongoing in Jerusalem, but many don’t open for tours, Carlin said.

“The excitement is great because [this area] is open to the general public, “he said.” It also sheds light on what life was like back then in one of the most important epochs of the Jewish people. “

Tour of the new area

Visitors can see the new underground areas through tours booked through the Wailing Wall Heritage Foundation, a non-profit government agency that administers the Western Wall.

The opening, which was originally scheduled for August, has been postponed to the Hannukah celebration in early December, Carlin said.

The ornate remains of the building are outside the Western Wall or “Western Wall”. The latter term falls out of favor as some consider it disdainful of the grief of the Jewish community over the loss of the Second Temple.

Yaniv Berman, Israel Antiquities Authority

He said that was “good timing” in more ways than one.

“If everything goes according to plan this week or early next week and our government approves the re-entry of tourists into Israel … that will actually collapse when the majority of the world can … travel to Israel.”

Golf outing raises cash for space veterans

WAUSAU, Wisconsin (WAOW) – Hundreds gathered Monday to play golf for veterans.

The 11th annual Charity Golf Outing of the Never Forgotten Honor Flight took place on Monday afternoon in the Wausau Country Club.

The event raised funds for the organization, which sends veterans to Washington DC to view monuments in their honor.

The organizers say it was full for the first time and had a waiting list for golfers.

They said it was great that so many came to support and honor veterans of the area.

“There are many veterans who play golf at the event,” said event chairman JoAnn Draeger, “and for dinner we will have wives and families of the veterans who are volunteering. It’s just a nice day to honor her. “

It costs $ 500 to send a veteran to DC and an additional $ 500 for their guardian.

Organizers predict they will raise nearly $ 50,000 this year, which would send 100 veterans to DC

Learn how to Picnic in Fashion within the Bay Space

There is no better time to have a picnic than now. Weather barriers are few in the Bay Area – aside from fog and wind – and the pandemic has taught us that it’s a great way to enjoy the outdoors. Whether you’re just sipping a sunset cocktail (or a mocktail) or enjoying a full three-course meal, we’ll talk about how to picnic in style, what foods are best to bring, and where to find the perfect picnic spot. We’re getting ideas to liven up your picnic with San Francisco Chronicle restaurant reviewer Soleil Ho, and we’d like your tips: What’s your favorite picnic recipe? Where are your favorite places in the Bay Area to bring family or friends out for an alfresco meal?

Leisure space thought-about for LR

Little Rock City Directors will have another opportunity during today’s meeting to approve a temporary entertainment district south of the River Market after deciding last month to postpone the action.

On the agenda of the board meeting is the resolution to create the temporary entertainment district Third Street for a period of 13 weeks.

According to the wording of the proposed resolution, the makeshift entertainment district would start on Wednesday and end on October 6th.

Boundaries would form a shape resembling a rectangle from the junction of East Second Street and River Market Avenues south to East Fourth Street, west from East Fourth Street to Cumberland Street, north on Cumberland Street to East Third Street and back to East Third Street and River Market Avenue.

There are several restaurants and bars in the area including Copper Grill, Dugan’s Pub, Lucky Lou’s, and Dizzy’s Gypsy Bistro.

Amusement districts allow guests at certain establishments to purchase alcoholic beverages, which can then be consumed from open containers in the designated area. It is unclear whether some or all of these restaurants will participate in the planned entertainment district activities.

The district’s opening times would be 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily.

According to a memo from the city administrator’s office that was included with the meeting papers, the Third Street Merchants Association applied for approval of the entertainment district with an outdoor seating area to be used by several restaurants.

At the same meeting, city directors will have the opportunity to pass a resolution to expand an existing temporary entertainment district in the Hillcrest neighborhood on three upcoming Thursdays: August 5th, September 2nd and October 7th.

The board voted on June 1 to propose the Third Street entertainment district resolution for a month after city directors raised concerns about caravanning and crime-related activities in the River Market District.

City officials last Tuesday reviewed the agenda for the upcoming meeting, which, like the final meeting of the board, will be held at Philander Smith College.

During the board meeting, City Manager Bruce Moore said there had been discussions and adjustments regarding traffic flow.

Metropolitan City Director Dean Kumpuris, who backed the June motion to delay setting up the district, said he will be hiking this week but commented on the proposed entertainment district.

Kumpuris said he spoke with a police lieutenant about using bollards as another form of barrier to keep two police officers from having to man the barricade the entire time.

He expressed hope that more people on the streets in the entertainment district would slow traffic through the area, an indication of the city’s recent problems with large groups of vehicles traveling together in caravans.

“So it can be a win-win situation,” said Kumpuris.

Colorado Springs space leisure occasions beginning July 1 | Arts & Leisure

THURSDAY

Paint the Town Blues Series — With Dave Day and Route 61, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Thorndale Park, 2310 W. Uintah St.; pikespeakblues.org/ paintthetownblue.

Country on the Courtyard Concert Series — With Hickabee, 6-9 p.m., Viewhouse, 7114 Campus Drive; 394-4137, viewhouse.com.

The Brad Eastin Quintet — 7 p.m., The Gold Room, 18 S. Nevada Ave. Tickets required: 634-4653, goldroomlive.com.

Super Clang — With The Short T.E.R.M, The Flower Gospel, 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $10. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

Habitual Offenders with Tracy Kellett — 7:30 p.m., Loonees Comedy Corner, 1305 N. Academy Blvd., $6. Tickets required: looneescc.com.

THURSDAY-FRIDAY

The Bellamy Brothers — 7:30 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13071 Bass Pro Drive, $49-$99. Tickets required: bootbarnhall.com.

FRIDAY

First & Main Town Center Concert Series — With 101st Army Band, 5-7 p.m., First & Main Town Center, 3302 Cinema Point; firstandmaintowncenter.com/events.

Kailani Dobson — 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30 p.m., GOCA Downtown, 121 S. Tejon St, Suite 100; gocadigital.org.

Snake and the Rabbit — 6-8 p.m., Buffalo Lodge Bicycle Resort, 2 El Paso Blvd.; 634-2851, bicycleresort.com.

”A Midsummer Night’s Dream” — Presented by Theareworks, 6 p.m., 112 E. Boulder St.; tinyurl.com/253dkesc.

Tovenaar — With Upon a Fields Whisper, Clarion Void, Kalakuta, 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $10. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

Figure — With Jeanie, Dub, Underground Sounds, 7 p.m., Sunshine Studios Live, 3970 Clearview Frontage Road, $25-$35. Tickets required: 392-8921, sunshinestudioslive.com.

Nico Coluucci — 8:30 p.m., The Wild Goose Meeting House, 401 N. Tejon St., $5; wildgoosemeetinghouse.com.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

Derrick Stroup — 7 and 9:30 p.m., 3E’s Comedy Club, 1 S. Nevada Ave., $20-$65. Tickets required: 3escomedy.com.

Jozalyn Sharp — 7 and 9:30 p.m., Loonees Comedy Corner, 1305 N. Academy Blvd., $8. Tickets required: looneescc.com.

FRIDAY-JULY 30

”Equilibrium” — Works by Shannon Mello, opens 5-9 p.m. Friday, G44 Gallery, 121 E. Boulder St. Exhibit runs noon-5 p.m. Thursdays- Saturdays; g44gallery.com.

FRIDAY-JULY 31

”What We Did” — Opens 5-8 p.m. Friday, Cottonwood Center for the Arts, 427 E. Colorado Ave. Exhibit runs through July 31; cottonwoodcenterforthearts.com.

”Cheers! Drink Up! 2021” — Featuring drinkware made from clay, Commonwheel Artists Co-op, 102 Canon Ave., Manitou Springs; commonwheel.com/cheers-2021.

”Nature of Summer” — Works by Wendy Iaconis, Suzy Gardner and Kang Lee Sheppard, Arati Artists Gallery, 2425 W. Colorado Ave.; aratiartistsgallery.com.

JULY 2-AUG. 8

”Morning, Noon and Night in Garden of the Gods” — Laura Reilly Fine Art Gallery and Studio, 2522-A W. Colorado Ave.; 650-1427.

SATURDAY

Front Range Fables — Family theatre performance and hands-on art activities, 10 10:45 and 11:30 a.m., Hillside Community Center, 925 S. Institute St. Registration required: 634-5583, fac.coloradocollege.edu/events/city-as-a– venue-2021.

Brut Fest — 6 p.m., Sunshine Studios Live, 3970 Clearview Frontage Road, $10. Tickets required: 392-8921, sunshinestudioslive.com.

Fighting the Phoenix — With The Endless Line, Arctic Origins, Lava Gato, 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $10. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

Dueling Pianos — 7 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13071 Bass Pro Drive, $25-$35. Tickets required: bootbarnhall.com.

Boyd Sweeney — 8:30 p.m., The Wild Goose Meeting House, 401 N. Tejon St., $5; wildgoosemeetinghouse.com.

SUNDAY

Banning Lewis Ranch Summer Concert Series — With Soul School, 7-9:30 p.m., Banning Lewis Ranch Recreation Center, 6885 Vista Del Pico Blvd.; 522-2432.

TUESDAY

Classic Tuesdays Concert Series: String Orchestra — Featuring musicians of the Colorado Springs Philharmonic, 6-7 p.m., Bancroft Park, 2408 W. Colorado Ave.; coloradosprings philmusicians.com.

Idaho with Mute Forest — 8 p.m., Lulu’s Downstairs, 107 Manitou Ave., Manitou Springs, $10. Tickets required: 424-7637, lulusdownstairs.com.

WEDNESDAY

Summer Concerts in the Glen — With Mississippi Mudders, 6-7:15 p.m., The Glen at Broadmoor Community Church, 315 Lake Ave.; broadmoorchurch.org.

Pikes Peak Jazz and Swing Society’s Jazz in the Parks Series — With The Mississippi Mudders, 6-8 p.m., The Glen at Broadmoor Community Church, 315 Lake Ave.; 592-9541.

Hillside Gardens Summer Concert Series — With John Wise and Tribe, 6-8:30 p.m., Hillside Gardens, 1006 S. Institute St., $10; 520-9463.

WEDNESDAY-JULY 8

Sunset Patio Sessions — Featuring Rico Southee, 6-8 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13701 Bass Pro Drive; 401-0600, bootbarnhall.com.

JULY 8

Paint the Town Blues Series — With Take 2 Blues and the Soulcasters, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Thorndale Park, 2310 W. Uintah St.; pikespeakblues.org/paintthetownblue.

”Colorado Springs Then and Now” Photo Exhibit Opening Reception — 5:30-8:30 p.m., Library 21c, 1175 Chapel Hills Drive; 260-6637.

Country on the Courtyard Concert Series — With Triple Nickel, 6-9 p.m., Viewhouse, 7114 Campus Drive; 394-4137, viewhouse.com.

Trapt — With Acedon Franklin, Mindless Vitality, Matthew Hennis, The R Souls, 6 p.m., Sunshine Studios Live, 3970 Clearview Frontage Road, $20. Tickets required: 392-8921, sunshinestudioslive.com.

Wheel of Doom with John Rumery — 7:30 p.m., Loonees Comedy Corner, 1305 N. Academy Blvd., $6. Tickets required: looneescc.com.

JULY 9

First & Main Town Center Concert Series — With 17th Avenue Allstars, 5-7 p.m., First & Main Town Center, 3302 Cinema Point; firstandmaintowncenter.com/events.

Leo and the Lark — 6-8 p.m., Buffalo Lodge Bicycle Resort, 2 El Paso Blvd.; 634-2851, bicycleresort.com.

Reminiscent Souls — With Suga Bear, 7 p.m., Stargazers Theatre, 10 S. Parkside Drive, $10. Tickets required: stargazerstheatre.com.

Sheep Sessions: He$h & More — 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $25. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

Jazz in the Garden Concert Series — With Wayne Wilkinson Trio, 7 p.m., Grace and St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 601 N. Tejon St.; gssepiscopal.org.

Mike Van Arsdale — 8:30 p.m., The Wild Goose Meeting House, 401 N. Tejon St., $5; wildgoosemeetinghouse.com.

JULY 9-10

Jay Hollingsworth — 7 and 9:30 p.m., Loonees Comedy Corner, 1305 N. Academy Blvd., $8. Tickets required: looneescc.com.

Steve Sabo — 7:30 and 9:45 p.m., 3E’s Comedy Club, 1 S. Nevada Ave., $20-$55. Tickets required: 3escomedy.com.

SofaKillers — 7:30 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13071 Bass Pro Drive, $25-$40. Tickets required: bootbarnhall.com.

JULY 9-18

Jurassic Quest Drive Thru — The Broadmoor World Arena, 3185 Venetucci Blvd., starting at $49 per vehicle. Tickets required: 477-2100, worldarena.com.

JULY 9-AUG. 28

”An American Night’s Dream” — Presented by Campfire Theater, 6:30 p.m., Monument Valley Park, 205 W. Fontanero St. Audience will be let on hiking trails as part of the show, $20. Tickets required: campfiretheatertours.com.

JULY 10

Front Range Fables — Family theatre performance and hands-on art activities, 10, 10:44 and 11:30 a.m., Meadows Park, 1943 S. El Paso Ave. Registration required: 634-5583, fac.coloradocollege.edu/events/city-as-a-venue-2021.

”A Midsummer Night’s Dream” — Presented by Theatreworks, 2 p.m., George Fellows Park, 5711 Tuckerman Drive; tinyurl.com/253dkesc.

Chris Webby — 6 p.m., Sunshine Studios Live, 3970 Clearview Frontage Road, $25 and up. Tickets required: 392-8921, sunshinestudioslive.com.

E.P.I.C. Concert and Film in the Park — 7 p.m., Acacia Park Bandshell, 115 E. Platte Ave., 634-5583, fac.coloradocollege.edu/events/city-as-a-venue-2021.

SemiFiction — With Stereo Ontario, The Sum Beaches, Emerson Bailey, Grimmly, 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $10. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

Rhythm and the Rose — 8:30 p.m., The Wild Goose Meeting House, 401 N. Tejon St., $5; wildgoosemeetinghouse.com.

JULY 10-11

Life of Bach: A Musical Journey — With Colorado Springs’ Early Music Ensemble, Parish House Baroque, 7-8 p.m. July 10, 2:30-4 p.m. July 11, First Lutheran Church, 1515 N. Cascade Ave, $10-$20. Tickets required: parishhouse baroque.org.

JULY 11

Hickabee & Brandon Henderson Band — 6 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13071 Bass Pro Drive, $10-$15. Tickets required: bootbarnhall.com.

In the Whale — With Salt of Sanguine, Redbush, 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $15. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

JULY 12

Gemini Syndrome — With A Killers Confession, Ovtlier, Pushing Veronica, 6 p.m., Sunshine Studios Live, 3970 Clearview Frontage Road, $15. Tickets required: 392-8921, sunshine studioslive.com.

Summer Concert Series — By Friends of Monument Park with New Horizons “Kicks” Band, 7 p.m., Monument Valley Park, 170 W. Cache La Poudre St.; fmvp.net.

JULY 13

Classic Tuesdays Concert Series: Brass Band — Featuring musicians of the Colorado Springs Philharmonic, 6-7 p.m., Bancroft Park, 2408 W. Colorado Ave.; coloradospringsphilmusicians.com.

JULY 14

Summer Concerts in the Glen — With The Mitguards, 6-7:15 p.m., The Glen at Broadmoor Community Church, 315 Lake Ave.; broadmoorchurch.org.

Pikes Peak Jazz and Swing Society’s Jazz in the Parks Series — With New Horizons “Kicks” Band, 6-8 p.m., Bear Creek Regional Park, 21st Street and Argus Boulevard; 592-9541.

Sunset Patio Sessions — Featuring Professor M, 6-8 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13701 Bass Pro Drive; 401-0600, bootbarnhall.com.

Hillside Gardens Summer Concert Series — With Playing with Smoke, 6-8:30 p.m., Hillside Gardens, 1006 S. Institute St., $10; 520-9463.

JULY 15

Paint the Town Blues Series — With Eef and the Blues Express, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Thorndale Park, 2310 W. Uintah St.; pikespeakblues.org/paintthetownblue.

Banning Lewis Ranch Summer Concert Series — With Collective Groove, 6-8 p.m., Banning Lewis Ranch Recreation Center, 6885 Vista Del Pico Blvd.; 522-2432.

Black Forest Summer Jazz Series — With New Horizons “Kick” Band, 6:30-8 p.m., Black Forest Community Club, 12530 Black Forest Road, Black Forest; bfcommunityclub.org.

Front Range Big Band — 7-8 p.m., Soda Springs Park, 1016 Manitou Ave., Manitou Springs; 494-3746.

You Look Like with Jonny & Brian — 7:30 p.m., Loonees Comedy Corner, 1305 N. Academy Blvd., $8. Tickets required: looneescc.com.

Little Texas — 7:30 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13071 Bass Pro Drive, $49-$55. Tickets required: bootbarnhall.com.

JULY 15-17

Jeremy Piven — 7 p.m. July 15, 7 and 9:30 p.m. July 16-17, 3E’s Comedy Club, 1 S. Nevada Ave., $35-$90. Tickets required: 3escomedy.com.

JULY 15-18

”Paranormal Cirque” — 7:30 p.m. July 15-16, 9:30 p.m. July 16-17, 6:30 p.m. 5:30 and 8:30 p.m. July 18, The Citadel Mall, 750 Citadel Drive East, $10-$50. Tickets required: tinyurl.com/ 2y7m3vbs.

JULY 15-AUG. 1

”Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill” — Shockley-Zalabak Theater, 5225 N. Nevada Ave., $15 and up. Tickets required: 255-3232, entcenterforthearts.org.

THROUGH JULY 24

”The Space(s) Between” Exhibit — GOCA Ent Center for the Arts, 5225 N. Nevada Ave. Tickets required: entcenterforthearts.org.

THROUGH AUG. 6

”U OK?” Exhibit — GOCA Downtown, 121 S. Tejon St, Suite 100. Tickets required: entcenterforthearts.org.

THROUGH AUG. 7

Papel Chicano Dos: Works on Paper from the Collection of Cheech Marin — 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 30 W. Dale St., $10. Tickets required: fac.coloradocollege.edu.

THROUGH AUG. 21

”To Bind or to Burn” — Works by Anna Tsouhlarakis, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 30 W. Dale St., $10. Tickets required: fac.coloradocollege.edu.

THROUGH SEPT. 2

Sack Lunch Serenade Shows — Free silent films accompanied by the Mighty Wurlitzer Theatre Pipe Organ, noon-1 p.m. Thursdays, Immanuel Organ Gym, 828 E. Pikes Peak Ave., $6 lunches available; 473-2010.

THROUGH SEPT. 4

Eugène Atget: “Photographing Paris, 1898-1925” — Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 30 W. Dale St., $5-$10 for nonmembers. Advance tickets required: fac.coloradocollege.edu/exhibits/eugene– atget-photographing-paris.

”Ansel Adams: Masterworks” — Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 30 W. Dale St., $5-$10 for nonmembers. Advance tickets required: fac.coloradocollege.edu/ exhibits/ansel-adams-masterworks.

THROUGH OCT. 2

”Honesty Always Wins … or … This Mine is Mine” — Melodrama dinner theater, The Iron Springs Chateau, 444 Ruxton Ave., Manitou Springs. Go online for costs. Reservations required: ironspringschateau.com.

COMPILED BY CARLOTTA OLSON, THE GAZETTE, 636-0221, CARLOTTA.OLSON@GAZETTE.COM

Proprietor of Austin-area buying facilities information for chapter; leisure advanced coming to Cedar Park and extra high space information

Washington Prime Group Inc. owns six shopping centers in the area, including The Arboretum. (Courtesy of the arboretum)

Read last week’s top business and community news from the Central Texas region.

Central Texas

Austin area mall owner files Chapter 11 bankruptcy

Washington Prime Group Inc. announced on June 15 that it and its subsidiaries would file voluntary Chapter 11 bankruptcy filings in the US Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Texas.

Leander Cedar Park

SIMILAR POSTS

• The Office of Police Oversight report finds that complaints against Austin police officers have increased but discipline has decreased in 2020
• North Pleasant Valley Road construction project in East Austin begins June 21st
• Austin Weird Homes Tour ends; Z’Tejas Shuts Down Restaurant Arboretum and Other News from Central Texas
• Travis County pledges to electrify its fleet and double its climate targets
• Indeed Tower in Downtown Austin is sold to a California real estate and development company in a $ 580 million deal

Pickleball, entertainment complex in Cedar Park

Cedar Park will be home to the first of three pickleball and entertainment complexes in central Texas.

Round Rock, Pflugerville-Hutto

RRISD parents request a public forum with the superintendent finalist and postpone the hiring

A total of 16 parents of Round Rock ISD spoke out on June 10th against the possible hiring of superintendent finalist Dr. Hafedh Azaiez without offering a town hall or a meeting.

In the Round Rock-Pflugerville-Hutto area, property prices are increasing year on year

The latest data from the Austin Board of Realtors shows that average house prices are reaching all-time highs in central Texas, including in the Round Rock-Pflugerville-Hutto area.

Georgetown

TxDOT is soliciting public opinion on proposed changes to I-35 in Georgetown

The Texas Department of Transportation is accepting public comments through June 26 on a proposed project in Georgetown to improve safety and mobility on I-35 between SE Inner Loop and RM 1431.

Brooke Sjoberg, Taylor Girtman, Brian Rash, and Trent Thompson contributed to this report.

Veteran Organizations are elevating cash for Veterans within the Joplin space | KSNF/KODE

JOPLIN, MO – Several veterans’ organizations in the area had stalls set up at the stop today.

Among them was “Our Veterans First”.

She’s raising money to build a small village for veterans in the Joplin area, similar to Kansas City.

The hope is to raise $ 1,500,000 to fund construction.

The village will provide temporary housing to veterans for up to 2 years until they are ready to come out on their own.

“We have between 30 and 50 veterans on the streets of Joplin every day who are either homeless or at risk, and we believe we can do better, we should do better,” says Michelle Lee, President, Our Veterans First .

For more information on Our Veterans First or the Nation of Patriots Tour, please see the links below.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Nonprofit-Organization/Ourveteransfirst-457307738367249/

https://www.nationofpatriots.com/

Bay Space residents wish to save more cash post-COVID: survey

Bay Area residents say they are ready to save more for an emergency and pay off debt after the unprecedented emotional and financial toll of 2020 and the COVID-19 pandemic.

But maybe they treat themselves to this long-delayed trip first. Or a really nice dinner.

These are the results of a new survey by financial services firm Charles Schwab, which surveyed 750 Bay Area residents about their financial plans in February. Two thirds of those surveyed said they would see themselves as savers in 2020, and 82 percent said they would save more than they would spend in the coming year.

In particular, 51 percent said they generally want to save more, while 28 percent want to reduce debt and 26 percent want to build an emergency fund.

“Many people have had an emergency in their own life,” said Colleen O’Brien, branch manager of Charles Schwab Oakland. “Everyone knows they should save, but that kind of catalyst, this event, really got people to do it,” he said

The results are similar to the results of a new national survey by Bankrate and SSRS, who reported that around eight in ten respondents said they had at least one financial regret come out of the pandemic. Most often, not saving enough for emergencies resulted in not saving for retirement and taking on too much credit card debt. About a quarter said they plan to save more for emergencies, while a fifth plan to spend less.

“Emergency saving has long been the Achilles’ heel of financial security as too many Americans are ill-prepared for the unexpected,” Greg McBride, Bankrate’s chief financial analyst, said in a statement. “The sudden and deep recession sparked by the pandemic has driven that point home.”

The renewed interest in saving money comes after a year in which California hit 16 percent unemployment in April 2020, due to the pandemic and lockdown designed to slow the spread of the virus. As of March, there were still 696,400 more unemployed Californians compared to the same period last year, according to the Department of Employment Development.

More than half of the Bay Area respondents who took part in the Charles Schwab survey said they would be financially affected by the 2020 pandemic. About a third said their salary or working hours had been reduced. More than a fifth have been dismissed or on leave.

Even so, some residents are hoping to have fun after COVID. About 53 percent of respondents said they dream of traveling again, and a third plan to take a vacation. Another 20 percent are planning to break out money for dinner at a fancy restaurant, and 14 percent are throwing a party. The focus for people, said O’Brien, is now less on buying expensive items and more on shared experiences. Even she thought about going on a trip now that vaccinations are more common.

“Is there anyone who hasn’t?” She said. “Maybe it’s not a trip to Europe, but maybe it’s a trip we can all be on together.”

For those hoping to be considered wealthy, the survey found that Bay Area residents saw the amount they deem necessary from $ 4.5 million in 2020 to $ 3.8 million reduce this year. To be financially happy, residents say they need $ 1.3 million – up from $ 1.5 million reported in last year’s survey.

O’Brien said part of that decline could be caused by people who were lucky enough to stay busy during the pandemic and decided to retire early or realized they didn’t need that much money to keep in to retire as they had previously thought.

“What we found was that the focus shifted,” she said. “When you have all the time to save more, you become more reflective.”

In parts of the Bay Area, of course $ 4 million is barely enough buy a house.

Lubbock space leisure information in short

“A New Moon Rises” is on display in the TTU Museum

The moon is not the same place astronauts last set foot on it. “A New Moon Rises”, a traveling exhibition from the Smithsonian, features 51 breathtaking large format photographs of the lunar surface taken between 2009 and 2015 by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Cameras.

This exhibit will be on view at the Museum of Texas Tech, 3301 Fourth St., through Sunday.

These images show a dynamic place with impact craters, recent volcanic activity, and a crust that has been broken by the shrinking of an interior that is still cooling. The images offer unique views of the lunar surface that not only help answer questions about the formation and evolution of the moon, but also reveal stunning landforms that are both strange and familiar.

“A New Moon Rises” was founded by the National Air and Space Museum and Arizona State University and is organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service for Travel.

The museum’s opening hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, 1-5 a.m. and closed on monday.

The gods have failed, Enfuraeon appears to Jake

The Gods Have Failed and Enfuraeon will perform on Saturday, May 15th at 7:30 p.m. at Jake’s Sports Cafe and Backroom, 5025 50th St.

The Gods Have Failed is a thrash metal band from West Texas, while Enfuraeon synchronizes their musical death metal.

General admission tickets are $ 10 plus a $ 2 service fee and can be purchased online at jandbproductions.net

Jason Boland and the Stragglers perform at Cactus

Jason Boland and the Stragglers will be performing on Friday, May 21st at 7:30 pm at the Cactus Theater, 1812 Buddy Holly Ave.

This show is a rescheduled date and previously purchased tickets have been reissued.

Jason Boland and the Stragglers have sharpened the sales of spacious venues and command platforms across the country for more than 20 years.

Since getting together in Stillwater, Oklahoma, Boland and his close-knit crew have sold more than half a million albums independently and have earned a loyal following that extends well beyond the band’s red roots.

All floor and standard balcony seating is $ 22.50 upfront and $ 27.50 on the day of the show. Balcony seating is $ 50 (including discounts).

Tickets can be bought online at www.cactustheater.com or at the box office during office hours from Monday to Friday from 3pm to 30pm. and on Saturdays and Sundays one hour before the scheduled show.

Los Texmaniacs perform at Cactus

Los Texmaniacs with special guest Augie Meyers will be performing on Saturday, May 22nd at 7:30 pm at the Cactus Theater, 1812 Buddy Holly Ave.

Max Baca and Los Texmaniacs are the past, present and future of conjunto music. Conjunto may be a familiar sound to Texas residents, but its global appeal can come as a surprise. Combine a hefty serving of Tex Mex conjunto, simmer with several pieces of Texas rock, add a daring dash of well-cured blues and R&B riffs, and you’ve got that yummy Grammy-winning Los Texmaniacs groove.

Tickets are $ 35 for floor, rows AD; US $ 30 for EM floor rows; $ 25 for standard balcony; and $ 60 for balcony seating (includes discounts; present your ticket at lobby counter before ordering).

Tickets can be bought online at www.cactustheater.com or at the box office during office hours from Monday to Friday from 3pm to 30pm. and on Saturdays and Sundays one hour before the scheduled show.

New exhibition opened in the TTU Museum

This Empty World is a new exhibit opening May 23 at the Texas Tech University Museum, 3301 Fourth St..

The exhibition deals with the escalating destruction of the natural world by humanity and shows a world in which, overwhelmed by the runaway development, there is no longer any space in which animals can survive. The people in the photos are also often helplessly carried away by the relentless tide of progress.

Each picture is a combination of two moments weeks apart, almost all from the exact same locked camera position.

The museum’s opening hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, 1-5 a.m. and closed on monday.

BHC Hosting Hosting traveling photo exhibition

The Buddy Holly Center is hosting the flagship traveling exhibition TPS 29: The International Competition of the Texas Photographic Society through May 23rd.

The exhibition will be open to the public and free of charge at the Center’s Fine Arts Gallery, 1801 Crickets Ave.

This exhibition opened at Houston’s The Silos in Sawyer Yards on October 23, 2020 and has since traveled across the state to Lubbock after stopping over at the Center for Contemporary Art in Abilene.

TPS 29: The international competition shows works by 50 different artists in the USA. From California to New York, Utah to Maine, Oregon to Georgia, these photographs have a wide range of styles and subjects that are both current and eye-catching.

Juror Elizabeth Avedon selected 50 images for TPS 29: The International Competition.

For more information about this exhibition, our virtual exhibition or museum resources, please visit our website www.buddyhollycenter.org.

The center is open Tuesday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from 1 a.m. to 5 a.m.

Crockett performs at Cactus

Charley Crockett will be performing on Friday, May 28th at 7:30 pm at the Cactus Theater, 1812 Buddy Holly Ave.

Crockett’s new album “Welcome to Hard Times” is an aptly named collection that fits these troubled days perfectly, despite the fact that it was made just before the pandemic hit. The music was shaped by his heart problems and the desire of producer Mark Neill to make “a dark gothic country record”.

The opening for Crockett is the singer-songwriter Jesse Daniel.

Tickets for this show are $ 25 upfront and $ 30 on the day of the show for the floor and standard balcony. and $ 60 for balcony seating (this ticket includes discounts – available when ordered in the lobby).

Tickets can be bought online at www.cactustheater.com or at the box office during office hours from Monday to Friday from 3pm to 30pm. and on Saturdays and Sundays one hour before the scheduled show.

The TTU museum houses “whereabouts and hiding places”.

The Texas Tech University Museum, 3301 Fourth St., is showing the “Wherabouts and Hideouts” exhibit through May 29th.

The exhibition is organized by the Artist Printmaker Research Collection (AP / RC), a division of the Art Collection, and includes a variety of works of art created since the 1960s. Among them, artists have paid much attention to what many refer to as the “built environment,” that is, the buildings and structures that humans have built and installed on the surface of the earth.

Buildings are flooding our planet. They reflect what is important to us, who we are. When these buildings rise and later turn into ruins, they record human activity and cultural expressions.

Four AP / RC artists from Texas and New Mexico turned their attention to regionally different views of our “built environment” and gave us a glimpse into the unparalleled collections of the Museum of Texas Tech University and each artist’s perspective on the buildings we work with Life.

The exhibition is free and open to the public. The museum is open from Thursday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Entries wanted for Lubbock Music NOW

Civic Lubbock Inc. is pleased to announce the call for entries for Lubbock Music NOW 2021, May 1-31.

Music artists within 100 miles of Lubbock who have played concerts in the city last year are invited to help create a music album for the year. Musicians submit titles to be narrowed down and judged by current and / or past members of the Recording Academy’s Texas Branch (Texas Grammy Board).

For information on Call for Entries for the 2021 Lubbock Music NOW album, visit the Civic Lubbock website: https://civiclubbock.com/lubbockmusic.html

The Lubbock Music NOW project was developed in 2016 by Civic Lubbock, Inc. to honor and recognize musicians living in the Lubbock area and to give visitors a picture of what is being produced in the local music scene.

Winners will receive $ 200 and will be included in the Lubbock Music NOW 2021 album. The album will be released on Spotify, ITunes, Amazon Music and CD Baby. The CD will also be available at the Buddy Holly Center, Ralph’s Records, and other local businesses.

Heat, Watson presents the Texas Legends Show at Cactus

Reverend Horton Heat and Dale Watson present Texas Legends Live on Friday June 4th at 7:30 p.m. at the Cactus Theater, 1812 Buddy Holly Ave.

In July 2016, Reverend Horton Heat Solo made his debut. For the first time in his career, The Rev, also known as Jim Heath, gave a series of sold-out concerts in select intimate theaters and locations across the United States

Combining new versions of Reverend Horton Heat classics with inside stories behind the music will reveal The Rev’s wit, Mediterranean charm, and some life stories that ultimately lead to the songs that made the band famous.

Watson returns with Call Me Insane, a new studio album recorded in Austin with veteran producer and Lubbock-born Lloyd Maines. The Austin-based honky tonker continues the tradition of Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson with its American root music “Ameripolitan”.

Tickets to this show are $ 30 for floor seating. $ 25 for standard balcony seating; and $ 60 for balcony box seats, including concessions.

Tickets can be bought online at www.cactustheater.com or at the box office during office hours from Monday to Friday from 3pm to 30pm. and on Saturdays and Sundays one hour before the scheduled show.

Hard hats and heels in favor of Habitat for Humanity

Hard Hats & Heels’ inaugural event to benefit Lubbock Habitat for Humanity will be held on Saturday, June 5th at 4:30 pm at the American Windmill Museum, 1701 Canyon Lake Drive.

This event gives attendees and sponsors the opportunity to enjoy food, fun and entertainment in a casual setting.

The night will bring together everyone associated with the construction industry and others who want to support the Habitat vision that everyone deserves a decent place to live. From auctions to dancing to kicking back and relaxing, this party is a great way to celebrate Habitat’s mission of building homes, communities and hope.

Tickets are $ 75 for general admission or $ 250 for VIP framer, including exclusive pre-party, priority seating, and other perks.

To purchase tickets, go to www.eventbrite.com and search for the event.

Dockside Restaurant Raises Cash For Grass River Pure Space

Dockside Restaurant in Torch Lake celebrated its spring fundraiser Monday, raising money for the Grass River Wildlife Area.

Half of all food and drink income went into GRNA programs, which include summer camps, paddling and wildlife activities.

Grass River says they have been hosting this event for more than 20 years, and even with limited capacity and additional take-out orders, they are still impressed with the response from the community.

“We’re just so grateful for all of the people that come out and support us through programs, through events like this, the Dockside, the people who come out and just put money in the jar,” said Jenn Wright, Executive Director of Grass River Natural area. “All of these resources are very, very valued and used very well.”

The GRNA says they typically raise around $ 2,500 through their Spring Fling event.