Santa Ana will spend federal pandemic cash on a number of fronts, together with a memorial for COVID-19 victims – Orange County Register

Santa Ana is spending $ 80 million on the first phase of a major pandemic recovery plan that could boost the city’s economy by distributing federal funds to residents, businesses, and nonprofits and launching several long-term projects, such as new open spaces , expanded public libraries, and Orange County’s first memorial to people who have died of COVID-19.

The plan, which was approved late Tuesday, called Revive Santa Ana, would send food vouchers to people living in the hardest hit neighborhoods, create new programs for young children, and upgrade some community centers. In addition, the city is planning new recreational opportunities, including a winter ice rink near the Civic Center that will serve as a roller skating rink in the warmer months.

And in what is possibly the most comprehensive pandemic relief plan unveiled in Orange County to date, Santa Ana will also look into setting up its own Department of Health.

These are just a few of the items funded primarily from the first part of $ 128 million that the city received under the U.S. bailout bill, approved by Congress earlier this year. The second half comes next year. Other funding – approximately $ 32.1 million – comes from federal housing and rental grants.

The city administration described their plan as a unique opportunity.

“We are all very blessed. Other municipalities do not have the opportunity to do so, ”said Mayor Vicente Sarmiento. “And we deliver it to the families who need it most.”

Many details still have to be ironed out. For example, the council has allocated $ 4 million to help some residents with local stimulus checks but has not yet decided which census area is eligible. Likewise, the city has not set the amount for the “basic income” checks.

How created that Spending plan breaks down into five categories:

• $ 5.4 million under a bucket called “Recovery from the pandemic“That includes $ 2 million for digital signs in parks, information kiosks, and a translation subscription service, $ 1 million for community mental health services, and $ 200,000 for a feasibility study to investigate the pros and cons of setting up a Santa Ana Health Department, which could help the city rely less on the Orange County Health Care Agency.

• $ 26.8 million in direct assistance programs. That includes $ 14 million in case of emergency Rental assistance – which lasted during the Santa Ana pandemic – and $ 3 million to help troubled small businesses and nonprofits. (Some of the money in this category comes from other sources.)

• $ 16.35 million for health and safety. This includes $ 7.8 million for the expansion of open spaces and parks, $ 3 million for a pedestrian protection project on First Street and Grand Avenue, and $ 1 million for a central farmers market and new community gardens.

• $ 21.25 million for critical infrastructure. This includes $ 7 million for “Central Library Remodeling Including Focus on Early Childhood Education Activities”; $ 3.5 million to investigate and address broadband deficiencies in the city and $ 1.5 million to modernize six community centers: Corbin, Logan, El Salvador, Sandpointe, Santa Anita and Delhi.

• $ 10.18 million to support the city’s public finances. Most of the money in this category – nearly $ 9 million – would go into the city’s reserve to offset hotel and business tax revenues lost during the pandemic

The rescue plan funds are intended to support measures to respond to COVID-19, replace lost revenue, support economic stabilization of households and businesses, and “address systemic public health and economic challenges that have contributed to the unequal impact of the pandemic “, So a. Employees report.

The funds give local governments “significant flexibility” to meet local needs, including “support for households, small businesses, affected industries, key workers and the communities hardest hit by the pandemic. These funds can be used, among other things, to make necessary investments in the water, sewer and broadband infrastructure, ”says an employee report from the city.

Santa Ana spokesman Paul Eakins said the planned spending was in line with guidelines for the funds. City officials, he said, are taking a comprehensive approach to improving the community’s health needs by looking at the bigger picture of Santa Ana, one of the densest cities in the country and also hardest hit by the ongoing pandemic.

“The idea behind many of these is that they address health and economic needs,” Eakins said, referring to the variety of elements in the plan. “It’s not just about responding to the pandemic in a reactionary manner. It addresses the more general issues raised and made clear during the pandemic, such as lack of access to green spaces, health care and internet, or being able to stay safe at night in a neighborhood – many issues that ultimately affect people’s health and makes them more prone to things like a pandemic.

“There’s the economic part too,” added Eakins. “Anything we can do to make companies easier to do business and more accessible to the public will have economic benefits.”

Councilor Phil Bacerra said Wednesday that the priorities defined by Revive Santa Ana are linked to COVID-19. Santa Ana has few parks, so “any opportunity to add parking space or improve the parking space we have is absolutely related to Covid,” he said. And improvements in broadband, Bacerra added, will be highlighted in the new plan after learning during the pandemic that the city “did not have adequate infrastructure to help our children (with online learning)”.

Meanwhile, Santa Ana appears to be the first in Orange County to provide money – $ 200,000 – for a kind of memorial to honor those who died of the virus.

“Over 800 residents in Santa Ana lost their lives to COVID-19. And that number has increased in the last few weeks, ”said Councilor David Penaloza.

“I know seven personally, whether they are close relatives or friends of my family, who have died of COVID-19.

“Because Santa Ana was hit so hard, it warrants a memorial,” added Penaloza. “We need something that gives families a place to mourn and remember loved ones. You deserve it.”

Doña Ana County enacts new noise limits on Airbnb-style properties

LAS CRUCES – Owners of Airbnb and Vrbo listed county residences will soon have to comply with new, targeted noise regulations.

Broadly proposed after rejection Changes to the Noise protection ordinance of the district last month The Doña Ana County Board of Commissioners, at its March 9 meeting, voted to codify its intention to regulate noise in short-term rental properties.

In a unanimous vote on Tuesday, the district commission approved an amendment to the District letting regulation that recently came into force.

The modification prohibits loud noises from short-term rental properties between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m. seven days a week. The existing, more comprehensive district ordinance prohibits loud noises from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. from Sunday evening to Friday morning. From Friday evening to Sunday morning and on public holidays, the Noise Abatement Ordinance comes into force at midnight and applies until 6 a.m.

More:Doña Ana County’s Short Term Rental Ordinance is now in effect

The amendment also states that a landlord “has the right to restrict or impose conditions on parties and gatherings on the premises, as well as conditions that limit disruption in the neighborhood and in the community”. The owner must post such restrictions in a prominent place on the property.

District 1 commissioner Lynn Ellins, who proposed the amendment to the short-term rental ordinance, said commissioners had received complaints about loud parties in some homes on weekends.

The noise protection regulations only apply to short-term rental properties within the jurisdiction of the district, with the exception of properties within the registered municipalities of the district. According to District Attorney Nelson Goodin, the new rules will go into effect 30 days from Tuesday.

Michael McDevitt is a city and county government reporter for Sun News. He can be reached at 575-202-3205, mmcdevitt@lcsun-news.com or @ MikeMcDTweets on twitter.

Ana de Armas struggled with Marilyn Monroe’s accent | Leisure

Ana de Armas admitted that she found it “a great torture” to master Marilyn Monroe’s accent for “blonde”.

The Cuban actress stars in the upcoming biopic in the late American film legend. It took her nine months to get a grip on the right tone of the dialogue and let her brain “fry”.

When asked if she could master Marilyn’s American accent, she said, “I’ve tried! All it took was nine months of dialect coaching, practice, and a few ADR sessions [rerecording dialogue after filming].

“It was great agony, so exhausting. My brain was fried. “

The 32-year-old star could see similarities between women now acting to those on screen in Marilyn’s heyday.

In an interview with Style magazine for the Sunday Times, she said, “As a woman in the industry, I had a lot of thought about how things from the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s are so reliable today.

“And when you don’t have a strong base, with your family and so on, it’s really hard to get through – really hard.”

Alicia Silverstone, Drew Van Acker and Stephen Moyer play in SHTF

Dan Stevens: The best actors are unrecognizable

When Ana first moved to the United States, she couldn’t speak English, but still auditioned for film roles and learned her scripts from their sounds alone.

She admitted, “At first I didn’t understand at all. But it’s getting better! “

The “Knives Out” star admitted that her success stunned her parents.

She said, “It blows her, it’s too much for her.”

However, she joked that sometimes she needs to remind her that she has become a name in Hollywood.

She quipped, “Sometimes, you know, I call my mom and say,” I’m doing this movie, “and she says,” Who’s in it? “And I’ll say,” I am! “”