Ridgeland enterprise raises cash for Alzheimer’s Affiliation

A company in Ridgeland raised money for a good cause on Saturday. Van’s Comics, Cards and Games celebrated its fifth birthday by giving something back. The comic book store raised money to donate to the Alzheimer’s Association. One of the owners of Van said they try to create a communal atmosphere so it was natural for them to help an organization hold DNC meetings, play magic cards, read comics together who wanted to take to the next level, like We can do even more for a charity and the public, “said store owner Travis Ryder. Money was raised from raffle tickets to win gift cards and other items donated by local businesses. A volunteer helped collect these donated items Items. This particular organization has a special place in her heart. “My grandmother suffered from dementia and eventually died of Alzheimer’s about two years ago. And recently I had a friend who was not even 65 who died of Alzheimer’s, “said Lori. Tharpe. According to the US Department of Health, Alzheimer’s is a brain disease that affects memory and thinking skills. Estimates are more than The disease is affecting 6 million people in America slowly. For most people, it is slow and very sad to see someone you love and know that you have memories, that they are losing memories and that they don’t even know who you are And it’s completely heartbreaking, “Tharpe said. The store has seen hundreds of attendees throughout the day, and Ryder’s goal is to raise $ 5,000 for the Alzheimer’s Association. “A lot of people have been affected by it or know someone who has been affected. Mom, Dad, the neighbors, whoever it is. We just wanted to use our large reach to actually reach and help more people,” said Ryder. Some of the companies that have donated include Sam’s Club, The Great American Cookie, Cathead Distillery, and more.

A company in Ridgeland raised money for a good cause on Saturday.

Van’s Comics, Cards and Games celebrated its fifth birthday with a return. The comic book store raised money to donate to the Alzheimer’s Association.

One of the owners of Van said he wanted to create a community atmosphere so that it was natural for them to help an organization.

“We’re already a community run place with people coming here to play DNC sessions, play magic cards, read comics together, wanting to take it to the next level, how we can benefit a charity and the public even more “said the owner of the shop Travis Ryder.

Money was raised from raffle tickets to win gift cards and other items donated by local businesses.

A volunteer helped collect these donated items. This particular organization holds a special place in their heart.

“My grandmother had dementia and eventually died of Alzheimer’s about two years ago. And recently I had a friend who was not even 65 who died of Alzheimer’s,” said Lori Tharpe.

According to the US Department of Health, Alzheimer’s is a brain disease that affects memory and thinking skills.

They estimate that the disease affects more than 6 million people in America.

“It is a terrible disease that is very quiet and slow. For most people it’s slow and it’s very sad to see someone you love and know you have memories, that they lose memories and they don’t even know who it is and it’s absolutely heartbreaking, “Tharpe said.

The store has seen hundreds of attendees throughout the day, and Ryder’s goal is to raise $ 5,000 for the Alzheimer’s Association.

“Many people are affected by it or know someone who is affected by it. Mom, Dad, their neighbor, whoever it may be. We just wanted to use our wide reach to actually meet and help more people. “Said Ryder.

Some of the companies that have donated include Sam’s Club, The Great American Cookie, Cathead Distillery, and more.

Seymour Crossing raises cash for Alzheimer’s Affiliation

Seymour Crossing resident Sharon Newman, right, pats Flash, a miniature therapy horse, while Kristye Lewis watches outside the senior community during an Alzheimer’s Association fundraiser Tuesday. Zach Spicer

Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia that affects memory, thinking, and behavior, and symptoms eventually become so severe that they interfere with daily tasks.

Alzheimer’s is the leading cause of dementia, a general term for memory loss and other cognitive skills severe enough to interfere with daily life and accounting for 60 to 80% of dementia cases, according to alz.org.

The biggest known risk factor is increasing age, the majority of people with Alzheimer’s are 65 years and older, and on average, a person with the disease lives four to eight years after being diagnosed but can live up to 20 years, says the Alzheimer’s Association .

Knowing all of these facts, Seymour Crossing, a senior citizens’ community run by American Senior Communities, has raised funds over the past few years to support the Alzheimer’s Association.

On Tuesday afternoon, money was collected at an outdoor event with a cake walk, raffle and face painting. All proceeds go to the organization, said Marty Root, the facility’s director of activities.

“ASC is one of the Alzheimer’s Association’s biggest supporters,” she said.

Also at the event were Kristye Lewis and her miniature therapy horse Flash, Lom Win with guitar and vocals, the Kovener’s Korner ice cream truck, a local resident selling handicrafts, a Seymour Police Department vehicle, a Jackson County Ambulance ambulance and a Hamilton fire truck the community’s volunteer fire department.

Root said she appreciated several local companies for donating items for the raffle and event.

This is the first time she has organized such an event and she hopes to make it bigger and better next year.

“We had a nice turnout and it turned out good for what it is,” said Root.

Resident Sharon Newman said her favorite part of the event was petting Flash.

“I love horses,” she says. “I drove all the time.”

Root said Seymour Crossing had a team of employees attend the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s in Columbus each year.

Last year’s event was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but will take place again this year and is scheduled for October 3rd at the Bartholomew County Fairgrounds.

“Each team needs to have a certain amount of money available,” said Root. “Everything that is raised here today goes straight to them.”

While raising money for the Alzheimer’s Association is important to Seymour Crossing, raising awareness about the disease is also a priority.

“We don’t have a barrier unit for people with Alzheimer’s, so we take in people in the early stages who don’t necessarily have to be in this closed area, but we do provide education here,” said Root.

“Some people take their loved ones back into the community with them, and here with our team and our nursing staff we offer education and everything that helps them to look after them at home if they only come here for therapy or rehab.” Or Reviews or something, ”she said.

Both the Alzheimer’s Association and Seymour Crossing provide education and resources for people who want to keep their family member at home.

“A lot of people sometimes don’t realize that people don’t come to the nursing home to live. They just come here to study and get stronger in therapy and then they go right back home, ”said Root. “It’s kind of different from years ago.”

FDA chief tells reporter ‘transfer on’ when pressed on Biogen Alzheimer’s drug approval

A pedestrian walks past Biogen Inc. headquarters in Cambridge, Massachusetts on Monday, June 7, 2021.

Adam Glanzman | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Acting Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, Dr. Janet Woodcock, on Wednesday, opposed a journalist’s questions about the controversial approval of rejected BiogenicAlzheimer’s drug, Aduhelm.

During an interview at STAT’s Breakthrough Science Summit, STAT reporter Nicholas Florko asked Woodcock several questions about the drug, including whether she was surprised that the agency approved it for such widespread use.

When the FDA approved Aduhelm last month, it didn’t limit its use to specific Alzheimer’s patients. But after facing heavy criticism, about a month later, U.S. regulators changed course, updated the label, and restricted use of the drug for people with mild or early-stage Alzheimer’s disease.

Woodcock said Wednesday that the broader label is in line with other drugs for neurodegenerative disease. The FDA chief also admitted that Biogen’s drug approval process could possibly have been handled differently.

“It is possible that the process would have been managed in a way that would have reduced the controversy associated with it,” she said.

Florko asked if she was surprised at the label. She replied, “I think we should go ahead.”

When Florko then pressed Woodcock to see if she was one reported meeting Between an FDA regulator and Biogen in 2019, Woodcock said she worked for Operation Warp Speed, former President Donald Trump’s Covid drug and vaccine program, all last year. Then she said, “Nick, this is an interrogation right now,” and asked again to move on from the biotech company’s drug questions.

“I will not comment if and when and who. I really think we should go ahead, ”she replied.

The interview came less than a week after Woodcock’s call for a federal investigation in the approval of Biogen’s drug. On Friday, she asked the independent Office of Inspector General to investigate interactions between the US agency and Biogen prior to the drug’s approval on June 7th.

Biogen’s stock rose last month after the FDA issued the Drug from the biotech company, the first US regulator-approved drug to slow cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer’s disease, and the first new drug for the disease in nearly two decades.

This decision was a departure from the recommendations of the agency’s independent panel of external experts, who unexpectedly refused to support the drug last fall, citing unconvincing data. At least three members of the committee resigned in protest after the agency’s approval.

Federal agencies have faced heavy pressure from friends and family of Alzheimer’s patients to ask for the drug scientifically known as aducanumab to be expedited. The drug targets a “sticky” compound in the brain known as beta-amyloid that scientists expect to play a role in the devastating disease.

The investigation is the most recent setback for the company and the drug, which has been controversial since 2016.

In March 2019, Biogen withdrew from development of the drug after analysis by an independent group found it was unlikely to work. The company then shocked investors a few months later by announcing that it would apply for regulatory approval for the drug after all.

When Biogen filed for approval for the drug in late 2019, its scientists said a new analysis of a larger data set showed that aducanumab “reduces clinical decline in patients with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease.”

Alzheimer’s experts and Wall Street analysts were immediately skeptical, wondering whether the clinical trial data was enough to prove the drug works and whether approval could make it difficult for other companies to enroll patients in their own drug trials.

Some doctors said they won’t prescribe it aducanumab due to the mixed data package supporting the company’s application.

‘Longest Day + 4’ to teach about Alzheimer’s, present leisure | Native Information

Anyone interested in helping more can sign up for the annual Kearney Alzheimer’s Walk on September 19th.

“Some of the money raised in our area will be used for education and to fund support groups for people with loved ones with Alzheimer’s or other dementia,” said Bigg.

When it comes to dealing with memory problems, Bigg understands that speaking helps with understanding.

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“Having a conversation helps reduce the fear of talking about Alzheimer’s in a positive way,” she said. “It is a very stressful illness to deal with – and for the people with dementia, it is constantly changing.”

Bigg always promotes a correct diagnosis.

“Dementia can have many different causes,” she says. “It’s pretty easy to identify Alzheimer’s compared to other dementia problems. There are some dementia problems that can be treated medically simply because they are caused by a blockage of blood to the brain and the like. We want people to be aware of it and not be afraid to talk about it. “

More than 6 million Americans are currently living with Alzheimer’s, including 5,000 in Nebraska. Bigg’s husband, Stan Bigg, died of Alzheimer’s in October 2019. Across the country, at least 11 million Americans care for someone with Alzheimer’s or dementia. In Nebraska, 82,000 people help with memory problems every day.

Biogen’s Alzheimer’s drug accepted by FDA, first new remedy in almost 20 years

The Food and Drug Administration approved on Monday BiogenicThe Alzheimer’s drug aducanumab is the first drug approved by the US authorities to slow cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer’s and the first new drug for the disease in almost two decades.

The FDA’s decision was eagerly awaited. The drug, which is marketed under the name Aduhelm, is also expected to generate billions in sales for the company offers new hope to friends and families of patients living with the disease.

“We are aware of the attention associated with this approval,” said Dr. Patrizia Cavazzoni, director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, in a press release. “We know that Aduhelm has drawn the attention of the press, the Alzheimer’s patient community, our elected officials and other interested stakeholders.”

“With treatment for a serious, life-threatening disease in balance, it makes sense that so many people followed the outcome of this review,” added Cavazzoni.

The FDA said it would continue to monitor the drug when it hits the US market. The agency granted approval on the condition that Biogen conduct another clinical study.

Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills. More than 6 million Americans are reportedly living with it Alzheimer’s Association estimates. According to the group, this number is expected to rise to almost 13 million by 2050.

To date, there have been no FDA-approved drugs that can slow the mental decline of Alzheimer’s, the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. The agency has approved Alzheimer’s drugs that are aimed at relieving symptoms rather than slowing the disease itself down.

Federal agencies have come under intense pressure from friends and family members of Alzheimer’s patients to speed up aducanumab, but the road to regulatory approval has been controversial since it showed promise in 2016.

In March 2019, Biogen stopped work on the drug after analysis by an independent group found it was unlikely to work. The company then shocked investors a few months later by announcing that it would apply for regulatory approval for the drug after all.

Biogen’s shares rose in November after gaining support from FDA staff, who said the company had shown very “compelling” evidence of aducanumab’s effectiveness and that it had “an acceptable safety profile that would support its use in people with Alzheimer’s disease”.

But two days later, an external panel of experts advises the US authorities unexpectedly declined to support the experimental drug citing inconclusive data. It also criticized the agency’s staff for rating it too positively.

When Biogen filed for approval for the drug in late 2019, its scientists said a new analysis of a larger data set showed that aducanumab “reduces clinical decline in patients with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease.”

Alzheimer’s experts and Wall Street analysts were immediately skeptical, wondering whether the clinical trial data was enough to prove the drug works and whether approval could make it difficult for other companies to enroll patients in their own drug trials.

Some doctors said they won’t prescribe it the drug when it hits the market due to the mixed data package that supports the company’s application.

Supporters, including advocacy groups and family members of patients desperately looking for a new treatment, have admitted the data is not perfect. However, they argue that it could help some patients with Alzheimer’s, a progressive and debilitating disease.

Biogen’s drug targets a “sticky” compound in the brain known as beta-amyloid that scientists expect to play a role in the devastating disease. The company previously estimated that approximately 1.5 million people with early-stage Alzheimer’s in the United States could be candidates for the drug, according to Reuters.

The FDA’s decision is expected to reverberate across the biopharmaceutical sector, RBC Capital Markets analyst Brian Abrahams said in a June 1 announcement to customers.

The US agency said Monday that it had determined that there was “substantial evidence” that the drug was helping patients. “With Aduhelm approved by the FDA, an important and critical new treatment is available to patients with Alzheimer’s disease to combat the disease,” it said.

WKU college students bike to E’city, elevate cash for Alzheimer’s trip | Native Information

Alzheimer’s disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

At Western Kentucky University, a group of students called Bike4Alz will ride cross country to raise funds and raise awareness about the disease.

The group will head to California and then cycle from the California coast to Virginia Beach, Virginia on May 18, arriving around July 28. This ride is approximately 3,600 miles in approximately 13 states. The bikers will average about 70 miles a day.

Along the way, students will hold events to raise funds and raise awareness in various locations around the country. The goal this year is to raise $ 100,000 for the Alzheimer’s Association.

In preparation for this ride, students cycled from Bowling Green to the Texas Roadhouse in Elizabethtown on Sunday, where they had set a table to raise awareness and money.

Justin Geilear, director of ride operations, said he was involved in the organization because the disease affected his life.

Geilear said his grandfather has Alzheimer’s and is currently on a memorial ward. He said he remembered seeing his grandfather after school, playing chess, and hearing his war stories. Now Geilear said it was difficult for him to formulate sentences.

“I’m really very passionate about trying to find a cure and not letting people go through the same thing,” he said.

Cy Whitler, one of the drivers who has been involved since 2019, said he learned about the organization through his brotherhood Gamma Delta Fiji. Whitler said his grandmother died of Alzheimer’s.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the trip was canceled for the summer of 2020, but the group was still able to raise funds.

“We were all pretty torn,” said Whitler.

Whitler said the team often practice and train for the ride, including 20 to 30 mile trips on the weekends. He said that those who take part in the ride are not necessarily trained cyclists, some even beginners.

Geilear said he was told by previous drivers that no training can be done to fully prepare for the entire trip. He said he was particularly concerned about the more mountainous regions of the country they have to drive through.

While driving, individuals can enter people’s names on the website under bicy4alz.org/dedicate-a-day. At the start of each day of driving, Geilear said they would read the names out loud to motivate who they were driving for.

“I’m very excited. I’m ready to go,” said Whitler. “I wish we could go tomorrow.”

Those who want to support the group can do so at bicy4alz.org/support-us and can follow the group’s progress on Twitter and Instagram @ Bike4Alz.

Grandfather raises cash for Alzheimer’s analysis by rowing solo throughout the Atlantic

The conversation

Will ignoring robocalls stop them? Here’s what we learned from 1.5 million calls on 66,000 phone lines

New research aims to provide phone companies with tools to help control robocalls. Peter Dazeley / The Image Database via Getty Images The Research Brief is a brief presentation of interesting academic work. The Big Idea More than 80% of robocalls come from fake numbers – and answering those calls doesn’t affect how many more you get. These are two key findings from an eleven month unwanted phone call study we conducted from February 2019 to January 2020. To better understand how these unwanted callers work, we monitored every call on over 66,000 phone lines at our phone security lab, the Robocall Observatory at North Carolina State University. During the study we received 1.48 million unsolicited calls. We answered some of these calls and let others ring. Contrary to popular belief, we’ve found that answering calls makes no difference in the number of robocalls received from a phone number. The weekly volume of robocalls remained constant throughout the study. As part of our study, we also developed the first method to identify robocalling campaigns that are responsible for a large number of these annoying, illegal and fraudulent robocalls. The main types of robocalling campaigns involved student loans, health insurance, Google business listings, general financial fraud, and a long-standing social security fraud. Using these techniques, we have learned that over 80% of calls from an average robocalling campaign use fake or ephemeral phone numbers to make unwanted calls. The perpetrators use these telephone numbers to deceive their victims and make it difficult to identify and track illegal robocallers. We have also seen some fraudulent robocalling operations impersonate government agencies for many months without being detected. They used messages in English and Mandarin and threatened the victims with dire consequences. These messages are aimed at vulnerable populations, including immigrants and the elderly. Why It Matters Providers can identify the true source of a call using a time-consuming manual process called traceback. There are too many robocalls for traceback these days to be a practical solution for any call. Our robocalling campaign identification technique is not just a powerful research tool. It can also be used by service providers to identify large scale robocalling operations. With our methods, providers only need to examine a small number of calls for each robocalling campaign. By specifically searching for abusive robocalls, service providers can block or stop these processes and protect their subscribers from fraud and illegal telemarketing. What is Not Yet Known Vendors are using a new technology called STIR / SHAKEN that may prevent robocallers from falsifying their phone numbers. When deployed, traceback for calls is simplified, but it does not work for carriers using older technologies. Robocallers also adapt quickly to new situations, so they may find a way to bypass STIR / SHAKEN. Nobody knows how robocallers interact with their victims and how often they change their strategies. For example, more and more robocalls and scammers are using COVID-19 as a prerequisite to scam people. What’s next? In the years to come, we will continue our research on robocalls. We will investigate if STIR / SHAKEN reduces robocalls. We are also developing techniques to better identify, understand, and assist vendors and law enforcement agencies in robocalling operations. This article was republished by The Conversation, a non-profit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts. It is written by: Sathvik Prasad, North Carolina State University and Bradley Reaves, North Carolina State University. Read more: Robocalls are unstoppable – 3 questions answered about why your phone won’t stop ringing. The Rise and Fall of the Fixed Line: 143 Years Telephones Become More Accessible – And SmartWhy Are There So Many Fools? A neuropsychologist explains that Sathvik Prasad is a member of the USENIX association. Bradley Reaves receives funding from the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research. This research was supported by donations in kind from Bandwidth and NomoRobo. Reaves is a member of the Communications Fraud Control Association, ACM, IEEE, and the USENIX Association.