Nationwide Restaurant Affiliation asks Congress for assist amid omicron

On March 18, 2021, people in New York City dine at an outdoor dining patio set up at a restaurant.

Angela Weiss | AFP | Getty Images

The National Restaurant Association is asking Congress to replenish the Restaurant Revitalization Fund as the Omicron variant hits operators’ businesses.

Last year, lawmakers set up the $28.6 billion fund to help bars and restaurants struggling in the wake of the crisis pandemic. The grants were intended to cover a restaurant’s total pandemic losses of up to $5 million for a single location or $10 million for a business with fewer than 20 locations. Public companies were not eligible, but their franchisees could still apply.

With the fund depleted, restaurants pressed for Congress to refill it. Several lawmakers have introduced legislation to do so, but the bills haven’t gained traction and the Biden administration didn’t seem interested in backing the measure.

but the recent spike in Covid-19 cases and its impact on restaurants could change minds.

The latest National Restaurant Association survey of operators found that 88% of restaurants saw a drop in demand for indoor dining due to the Omicron variant. More than three-quarters of those polled told the trade group that business conditions are worse now than they were three months ago. And the majority of operators said their restaurant is less profitable today than it was before the pandemic.

“Alarmingly, the industry has still not recovered the more than 650,000 jobs lost at the start of the pandemic, a loss 45% more than the closest industry,” trade group top lobbyist Sean Kennedy wrote in a letter to the Congress leadership for both parties .

Kennedy also noted the benefits of the first round of RRF grants. The trade group estimates the first round of funding saved more than 900,000 restaurant jobs, and 96% of recipients said the grant made it more likely they could stay in business. A full replenishment of the fund would save more than 1.6 million jobs, the trade group estimates.

Ceremony Support to shut a minimum of 63 shops within the coming months

A Rite Aid store is on display in downtown Los Angeles, California, the United States, October 16, 2019. Picture dated October 16, 2019.

Mike Blake | Reuters

Drugstore chain Ritual help said Tuesday it plans to close at least 63 stores as the number of locations needed is re-evaluated.

The company said the closings were identified as part of an ongoing review and expects more stores to close over the next several months.

Rite Aid said its goal is to cut costs, increase profitability and have “solid foundations”. The company said the 63 closings that began last month are expected to increase its earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization by about $ 25 million.

On Tuesday, Rite Aid released mixed financial results for the third quarter of its fiscal year. Although the company was making more than expected on an adjusted basis, its revenue for the three months ended Nov. 27 was lower than analysts forecast. The retailer also lowered the sales outlook for the financial year.

Rite Aid’s shares rose more than 16% in early trading. By the close of trading on Monday, the stock was down about 22% year-to-date, bringing Rite Aid’s market cap to nearly $ 692 million.

A list of the dozen of stores Rite Aid sought to close was not immediately available. Rite Aid operates more than 2,400 retail pharmacies in the United States

Last month drug store rivals CVS health said it will around 900 stores close over the next three years as it adapts to buyers who buy more online.

Both CVS and Walgreens have increased their focus on digital growth and made businesses into destinations that offer a range of health services from flu vaccinations to diagnostic tests.

Find the full press release on Rite Aid’s results here here.

There’s numerous monetary support out there to ladies pursuing STEM careers

Women are clearly underrepresented in STEM professions and there are many financial challenges for the few who aspire to scientific, technical, technical or mathematical professions. For this reason, many companies and organizations offer scholarships and other financial support to help bridge this gender gap in these important areas.

Only 1 in 4 employees in computer and math professions and 1 in 6 in architecture and engineering professions are women, they say Labor Statistics Office. In addition, for every dollar a man makes in STEM, a woman makes 14 cents less, according to the Department of Commerce.

“Improved access to higher education opportunities is one of the best strategies for reducing the gender gap in STEM areas,” said Rachel Morford, president of the Society of Women Engineers. “Scholarships help set this positive trend in motion by funding a woman’s access to STEM courses for bachelor, master and doctoral students. Designing projects and pursuing research or internship opportunities – all of these serve to keep women in STEM areas through graduation and beyond. “

Scholarships for women in STEM

There are many grants from organizations, foundations, and companies that are available to women in STEM careers.

The Society of Women Engineers (SWE) is a pioneer in supporting female students with an ABET-accredited (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology) undergraduate or graduate program in engineering, engineering and computer science. In addition to supporting students on campus, SWE gave in 2020 260+ new and renewed scholarships female students around the world were worth a total of $ 1 million. SWE makes the application process easy, because with one application students can qualify for all applications that are relevant to them.

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Microsoft conducted a study that found that in 2016 only 7% of women got a college degree in science, technology, engineering, or math, compared to 15% of men. In addition, women tend to take science-based courses instead of engineering, math, or computer-based courses, and are paid less than men. Microsoft offers Scholarships for women pursuing a career in STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and math) at college level.

“Access to scholarships can help alleviate some of the pressures women face today in MPOWER Financing’s corporate strategy of providing scholarships to women aspiring to STEM careers. “All of this can help fill the gaps not only for women – but also for those in underrepresented communities.”

Some other scholarships for women pursuing STEM careers include: the BHW Scholarship for Women in STEM, the Virginia Heinlein Memorial Scholarship, the Science Ambassador Scholarship funded by Cards Against Humanity, the ABC Humane Wildlife Women in STEM Academic Scholarship, the Girls Who STEM Scholarship, Adobe Research Women-in-Technology Scholarship, Hyundai Women in Stem Scholarship, and Amazon Future Engineer Scholarship Program.

Scholarships designed specifically for women aspiring to engineering careers include: The Palantir Women in Technology Scholarship, the Lynn G. Bellenger Scholarship, and the UPS Scholarship for Female Students.

The application process

Kaylin Moss, a senior at Marist College studying computer science, applied for hundreds of scholarships she found through databases, social media, or internet research. She won a Generation Google Scholarship.

Kaylin Moss, senior computer science officer at Marist College

Source: Steven Howard

Moss says the “application process was tedious” ̶ she had to answer three essay questions and submit a résumé and certificate. One of her essays was about how she founded the Marist College Chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers, the second of her solutions to many of the challenges underrepresented groups in the tech industry face when pursuing careers in technology, and the third illustrated their financial needs.

Applicants were judged based on their financial needs, commitment to diversity and inclusion, leadership skills, and academic performance.

Some scholarships require essay writing, while others ask for videos or artwork. And the application process is an expenditure of time. Moss recommends focusing on scholarships that best fit your communication method. So if you enjoy writing – go to the essays. If you’re a natural on camera, go to the Scholarships that ask for a video.

An applicant is more likely to win a scholarship if the applicant pool is small. Therefore, in addition to larger national scholarships, students should also apply for smaller, local scholarships to increase their chances of winning.

Olivia Haberberger, Senior Business Information Systems and Accounting Student at the University of Pittsburgh, receives the Pitt Success Grant and the Addison H. Gibson Foundation Grant.

Olivia Haberberger, Senior Business Information Systems and Accounting Student at the University of Pittsburgh

Source: Maddy Haberberger

The Pitt Success Grant was awarded as needed, so Haberberger only had to fill out the FAFSA (free student grant application) and meet a specific benchmark for the cumulative GPA each year. The Addison H. Gibson Foundation scholarship was also awarded as needed. Haberberger wrote a thank you letter to express her gratitude.

Success strategies

Haberberger advises other students to “stand up for yourself” and “think about how much time and energy you need to spend on the application”.

It is important to start your research early and stay organized so as not to miss any deadlines, like this stipendien.com, a website where students can search for scholarships and other financial aid.

The Education Quest Foundation cautions that if you postpone it at the last minute, you can be in a rush and then risk making mistakes with your application. They advise students to always proofread applications to avoid spelling and grammatical errors. And send it in early – sometimes that can make all the difference.

Rachel Morford emphasizes that “research and preparation should be started early!” For example, if you look at everything the Society of Women Engineers has to offer, you will find that there is a main application for scholarships at the organizational level, but some of the local specialist departments also have scholarship programs that you may be questioning for too.

“Talk to your school counselors and counselors, as well as the career center at your college or university, as they are likely to know about the options available,” Morford said.

“Funding is often the biggest obstacle to education, especially for international and DACA students, “Ramani explained.

“If you are interested in a STEM degree, our best advice is to do your research and evaluate the funding opportunities available to you,” said Ramani. “For example, the Society of Women Engineers has a lot of support resources on their website and your university may have resources to share. Funding is usually available; it’s just about accessing and evaluating what’s right for you, when It depends on loan repayment conditions, scholarship requirements, expectations of a dual study program, etc.

MPOWER is trying to remove barriers for students, explained Ramani. “We evaluate a student’s ability to repay their loan based on a unique set of considerations on the credit side. This leads to better results and less postponement or default. On the scholarship side, we evaluate each student’s application based on their accomplishments, goals, and needs . “

Grace Ulmer, an electrical engineering and linguistics student at Purdue University and recipient of The Palantir Women in Technology Scholarship – North America during her junior year, suggests “regularly looking for scholarships to apply and when you find one If you care, put “its date on the calendar!”

Although Ulmer did not find the application process quite as rigorous, she had to answer questions about her grades and courses as well as short essay questions about why she chose her subject and why it is important for women to have these opportunities.

Grace Ulmer, an electrical engineering and linguistics student at Purdue University.

Source: Ryan Villarreal

Ulmer decided to write three short essays about projects she was passionate about and how she could overcome obstacles to complete them. She wrote about her passion for student organizations in which she is involved, including “TEDxPurdueU, which hosts an annual TED conference each year, and PurdueVotes, which focuses on voter engagement and education in our community”.

She would also recommend looking for scholarships that play what you’re good at. For example, there are some scholarships that will accept presentations or videos on any topic that interests you.

“These are great opportunities to show who you are and to give the selection committee the best possible view of you,” said Ulmer.

In addition to doing your own online research and liaising with your school’s career centers and financial aid offices, there are many organizations that can help you successfully launch a career in the STEM field. They offer everything from help with finding scholarships to career development, networking, mentoring, and breaking the barriers for women in STEM. They include:

So don’t let the cost of a STEM education or anything else put you off. Think about what you’d like to do, apply for scholarships, and start networking. There are many people and organizations ready to put you on your way to a successful career in science, technology, engineering, or math.

CNBCs “College votes″ Is a series written by CNBC interns from universities across the country to help them get their college education, manage their own money and start their careers during these extraordinary times. Allison Martin is a two year intern on CNBC’s product and technology team. She is a senior at Virginia Commonwealth University and is pursuing a dual degree in computer science with a focus on data science and psychology with two minor subjects in actuarial mathematics and mathematics. The series is published by Cindy Perman.

With Assist Cash, US Faculties Place Consideration on Psychological Well being

Schools in the United States are using a large increase in federal funding to support student mental health.

School systems or districts are given a lot of freedom in how they can spend the federal money. But psychological problems in the students had become clear. Districts have an increase in behavioral problems, and signs of stress Absenteeism when students returned to class this fall. For many, it was the first time back in a full classroom since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In Kansas City, Kansas, educators open an after-school mental health center. The center is filled with advisor and social workers. Schools in Chicago, Illinois have “mentoring teams” on a mission to help students in difficulty.

In some school districts, the money has supported longstanding work to help students deal with trauma – difficult experiences that have led to emotional problems. Other school systems have made new efforts to treat students. Overall, money puts public schools at the center of efforts to improve the overall well-being of students.

When the government sent aid to schools after the economic recession in 2008, conversation didn’t happen, ”said Amanda Fitzgerald. She is with the American School Counselor Association. Now, according to Fitzgerald, the discussion across the country is very much about student welfare.

Last month, three major child health groups said the child mental health situation should be viewed as a national emergency. The U.S. Department of Education has called on the aid to rethink the way schools offer psychological support. Education Minister Miguel Cardona said mental health needs to be at the center of recovery from the pandemic.

Pandemic aid to schools is $ 190 billion. That’s more than four times what the Department of Education normally spends kindergarten up to 12th grade every year. The money for mental health services went towards employee training, mental health assessments, and classes that include social and emotional learning.

Fifth grader Jordan Falconbury reads in a tent while visiting a sensory room at Quincy Elementary School in Topeka, Kansas on Wednesday, November 3, 2021 (AP Photo / Charlie Riedel)

Many counties have worked on it rent more mental health experts. The National Association of School Psychologists surveyed its members in the fall. It found that more than half of the districts had plans to host social workers, Psychologists or consultant.

With $ 9.5 million in federal and external grants, Paterson Schools in New Jersey added five behavioral experts. The district also hired two substance abuse experts and workers who were able to identify students in crisis.

Paterson is one of the poorest parts of New Jersey. Many of the 25,000 students there were hungry before the pandemic and struggled after family members lost their jobs, Superintendent Eileen Shafer said.

“We wanted to make sure that before we tried to teach anything new, we could handle where our kids are based on what they went through,” she said.

In Ellicottville, New York, school psychologist Joe Prior sees more anxiety among students. He said the district would use the help to hire a counselor to connect students with psychological help.

Chicago, the third largest school district in the country, created a “cure plan” for students using $ 24 million of the $ 2.6 billion in federal aid.

In Detroit, the district spends $ 34 million on mental health programs. The school system uses the money to screen students, expand help from outside mental health providers, and provide additional support to parents.

On a last Wednesday that meant an hour meditation Parents meet at a local cafe. One parent feared that their own stress was affecting their son’s ability to learn.

“As a community, we’ve all been through something,” said Sharlonda Buckman, an assistant superintendent who attended the meeting. “Part of the recovery has to be something” intentionally work in spaces like this so we can be there for ours children. “

I am Dan Novak.

The Associated Press and Chalkbeat covered this story. Dan Novak adapted it for VOA Learning English. Ashley Thompson was the editor.

Quiz – U.S. schools use aid funds to monitor mental health


Start the quiz to find out

________________________________________

Words in this story

absent – adj. not present in a usual or expected place

advisor – n. a person who provides professional advice

conversation – n. an informal conversation with two people or a small group of people: the act of informal conversation

kindergarten – n. a school or class for very young children

rent – v. Giving (someone) a job or a job in exchange for wages or salaries

psychologist – n. a scientist who specializes in the study and treatment of mind and behavior

anxiety – n. Fear or nervousness about what might happen

meditation– n. the act or process of spending time in silent thought

intentionally – adj. be done in a planned or intended manner

child – n. a young person

With US Assist Cash, Colleges Put Larger Concentrate on Psychological Well being

In Kansas City, Kansas, educators open an after-school mental health clinic staffed with school counselors and social workers. Schools in Paterson, New Jersey have set up socio-emotional learning teams to identify students dealing with crisis. Chicago sets up “mentoring teams” with a mission to help students in difficulty on its 500+ campuses.

With a stroke of luck in federal coronavirus relief funds, schools in the United States are using parts to quickly expand their capacity to deal with students’ mental health issues.

While school districts have plenty of leeway in using the aid funds, the urgency of the problem has been made clear by absenteeism, behavioral issues and quieter signs of distress as many students hit for the first time since the coronavirus pandemic this fall.

In some school systems, the money has fueled longstanding trauma-coping work. Others have made new efforts to screen, counsel, and treat students. All in all, investment has put public schools at the center of efforts for the general welfare of students more than ever.

“In the last recession, with the last big chunk of recovery money, that conversation didn’t take place,” said Amanda Fitzgerald, assistant director of the American School Counselor Association. “Now the tone is very much geared towards the well-being of the students across the country.”

Last month, three major pediatric groups said the state of children’s mental health should be considered a national emergency. The US Department of Education has pointed out aid distribution to rethink how schools provide psychological support. Mental wellbeing, said Education Minister Miguel Cardona, must be the foundation for recovery from the pandemic.

Pandemic aid to schools is $ 190 billion, more than four times the amount the Department of Education typically spends annually on K-12 schools. Investments in mental health have gone into employee training, wellness screenings and curricula for social-emotional learning.

Questions remain, however, as to how schools will find ways to reap the benefits beyond the one-time cash injection, address privacy concerns, and track the effectiveness of their efforts. The implementation worries Katie Dockweiler, a Nevada school psychologist who sits on the state education committee.

“Not all programs are created equal,” she said. “It really depends on how it is implemented, school by school. And there is a lot of variability.”

She said the districts should develop ways to track the impact on students: “Otherwise we’ll just throw our money away.”

At the top of the list for many districts is the recruitment of new mental health specialists. When the National Association of School Psychologists surveyed members this fall, more than half of those polled said their districts intend to add social workers, psychologists or counselors, according to policy director Kelly Vaillancourt Strobach.

With $ 9.5 million in federal aid and outside grants, the Paterson Schools added five behavioral analysts, two substance abuse coordinators, and the teams to identify students in crisis situations.

In Paterson, one of the lowest-income parts of New Jersey, many of the 25,000 college students faced food insecurity prior to the pandemic and struggled after family members lost their jobs, Superintendent Eileen Shafer said.

“Before we tried to teach anything new, we wanted to make sure we were able to navigate where our children are based on what they’ve been through,” she said.

A student works on a puzzle while visiting a French middle school sensory room in Topeka, Kansas on Wednesday, November 3, 2021. The rooms are designed to relieve student stress when they return to classrooms amid the ongoing pandemic.

In rural Ellicottville, New York, where school psychologist Joe Prior sees more anxiety and a “marked increase” in panic attacks, the district plans to hire a life-saving agent to connect students with psychological help. But the position remains vacant as only a few have expressed interest.

“I have more students who just look into my eyes and say, ‘I’m completely overwhelmed and don’t know how to deal with it,'” said Erich Ploetz, headmaster of Ellicottville High School.

It’s not the only district where hiring ambitions have exceeded the number of skilled workers available. Some districts have turned to outside providers to fill mental health positions while others are training existing staff.

The Kansas City, Kansas school system is using a portion of the $ 918,000 mental health grant to pay for social workers and counselors who are already on the job at the new afternoon clinic. The district has also added staff and mental health exams.

Angela Dunn, who leads mental health and suicide prevention initiatives for the 22,000 student district, said the mental health team has responded to 27 student deaths and 16 employee deaths since the pandemic began, double the number over that period typical. She said a handful of employees died from COVID-19, but many of the others were murders, suicides and overdoses.

A student shares her feelings while visiting a sensory room at Williams Elementary School on November 3, 2021 in Topeka, Kansas.

Schools’ investments in student mental health services have raised some privacy concerns, particularly where schools are now monitoring student computers for distress signals or performing mental health tests on all students. But the notion that it’s not where schools can get involved at all has been forgotten.

“We just realized that students like to go to school to seek help,” said Dunn.

Chicago, the country’s third largest school district, unveiled a “cure plan” for high school students using $ 24 million of its $ 2.6 billion in stimulus funds.

Over the course of three years, the district will expand “mentoring teams” – construction personnel who serve as the first point of contact for students in difficulty – to each campus. 200 schools are to be reached by spring.

The headmistress Angélica Altamirano used some of these funds to open a room that is furnished with comfortable furniture and a used air hockey table. The campus center has already offered mourning groups for deceased students or friends and helped teachers deal with burnout.

In Topeka, Kansas, $ 100,000 was allocated for soothing items and sensory room personnel, including one at the Quincy Elementary. When students are so frustrated that they lay their heads on their desks, wander into the hallway, or cry, teachers can send them to the Roadrunner Room. There they can climb into a tent and snuggle under a weighted blanket, put together a puzzle, play with sand or build with Legos.

The Dean of Studies Andrea Keck observed how the room became a point of contact for a student in order to reduce frustrations.

“She can log it, have her hair pinned up, whatever she needs, and then she can be successful for the rest of the day,” says Keck, who oversees the room.

In Detroit, the district is spending $ 34 million on mental health initiatives, including screening high school students, expanding help from outside mental health providers, and providing additional support for parents.

Last Wednesday, that meant an hour-long meditation session for parents in a local coffee shop. One participant feared that her own stress was affecting her son’s ability to learn.

“As a community, we’ve all been through something,” said Sharlonda Buckman, an assistant superintendent who attended the meeting. “Part of recovery has to be deliberate work in spaces like this so we can be there for our children.”

With U.S. help cash, faculties put larger deal with psychological well being

CHICAGO – Educators are opening an after-school mental health clinic in Kansas City, Kansas, staffed with school counselors and social workers. Schools in Paterson, New Jersey have set up socio-emotional learning teams to identify students dealing with crisis. Chicago sets up “mentoring teams” with a mission to help students in difficulty on its 500+ campuses.

With a stroke of luck in federal coronavirus relief funds, schools in the United States are using parts to quickly expand their capacity to deal with students’ mental health issues.

While school districts have plenty of leeway in using the aid funds, the urgency of the problem has been made clear by absenteeism, behavioral issues and quieter signs of distress as many students hit for the first time since the coronavirus pandemic this fall.

In some school systems, the money has fueled longstanding trauma-coping work. Others have made new efforts to screen, counsel, and treat students. All in all, investment has put public schools at the center of efforts for the general welfare of students more than ever.

“In the last recession, with the last big chunk of recovery money, that conversation didn’t take place,” said Amanda Fitzgerald, assistant director of the American School Counselor Association. “Now the tone is very much geared towards the well-being of the students across the country.”

Last month, three major pediatric groups said the state of children’s mental health should be considered a national emergency. The US Department of Education has pointed out aid distribution to rethink how schools provide psychological support. Mental wellbeing, said Education Minister Miguel Cardona, must be the foundation for recovery from the pandemic.

Pandemic aid to schools is $ 190 billion, more than four times the amount the Department of Education typically spends annually on K-12 schools. Investments in mental health have gone into employee training, wellness screenings and curricula for social-emotional learning.

Questions remain, however, as to how schools will find ways to reap the benefits beyond the one-time cash injection, address privacy concerns, and track the effectiveness of their efforts. The implementation worries Katie Dockweiler, a Nevada school psychologist who sits on the state education committee.

“Not all programs are created equal,” she said. “It really depends on how it’s done, school by school. And there is a great deal of variability. “

She said the districts should develop ways to track the impact on students: “Otherwise we’ll just throw our money away.”

At the top of the list for many districts is the recruitment of new mental health specialists. When the National Association of School Psychologists surveyed members this fall, more than half of those polled said their districts intend to add social workers, psychologists or counselors, according to policy director Kelly Vaillancourt Strobach.

With $ 9.5 million in federal aid and outside grants, the Paterson Schools added five behavioral analysts, two substance abuse coordinators, and the teams to identify students in crisis situations.

In Paterson, one of the lowest-income parts of New Jersey, many of the 25,000 college students faced food insecurity prior to the pandemic and struggled after family members lost their jobs, Superintendent Eileen Shafer said.

“Before we tried to teach anything new, we wanted to make sure we could handle where our kids are based on what they’ve been through,” she said.

In rural Ellicottville, New York, where school psychologist Joe Prior sees more anxiety and a “marked increase” in panic attacks, the district plans to hire a life-saving agent to connect students with psychological help. But the position remains vacant as only a few have expressed interest.

“I have more students who just look into my eyes and say, ‘I’m completely overwhelmed and don’t know how to deal with it,'” said Erich Ploetz, Headmaster of Ellicottville High School.

It’s not the only district where hiring ambitions have exceeded the number of skilled workers available. Some districts have turned to outside providers to fill mental health positions while others are training existing staff.

The Kansas City, Kansas school system is using a portion of the $ 918,000 mental health grant to pay for social workers and counselors who are already on the job at the new afternoon clinic. The district has also added staff and mental health exams.

Angela Dunn, who leads mental health and suicide prevention initiatives for the 22,000 student district, said the mental health team has responded to 27 student deaths and 16 employee deaths since the pandemic began, double the number over that period typical. She said a handful of employees died from COVID-19, but many of the others were murders, suicides and overdoses.

Schools’ investments in student mental health services have raised some privacy concerns, particularly where schools are now monitoring student computers for distress signals or performing mental health tests on all students. But the notion that it’s not where schools can get involved at all has been forgotten.

“We just realized that students are comfortable seeking help in a school,” said Dunn.

Chicago, the third largest school district in the country, unveiled a “cure plan” for high school students using $ 24 million of its $ 2.6 billion in stimulus funds.

Over the course of three years, the district will expand “mentoring teams” – construction personnel who serve as the first response to students in difficulty – to each campus. 200 schools are to be reached by spring.

The headmistress Angélica Altamirano used some of these funds to open a room that is furnished with comfortable furniture and a used air hockey table. The campus center has already offered mourning groups for deceased students or friends and helped teachers deal with burnout.

In Topeka, Kansas, $ 100,000 was allocated for soothing items and sensory room personnel, including one at the Quincy Elementary. When students are so frustrated that they lay their heads on their desks, wander into the hallway, or cry, teachers can send them to the Roadrunner Room. There they can climb into a tent and snuggle under a weighted blanket, put together a puzzle, play with sand or build with Legos.

The Dean of Studies Andrea Keck observed how the room became a point of contact for a student in order to reduce frustrations.

“She can log it, have her hair pinned up, whatever she needs, and then she can be successful for the rest of the day,” says Keck, who oversees the room.

In Detroit, the district is spending $ 34 million on mental health initiatives, including screening high school students, expanding help from outside mental health providers, and providing additional support for parents.

Last Wednesday, that meant an hour-long meditation session for parents in a local coffee shop. One participant feared that her own stress was affecting her son’s ability to learn.

“As a community, we’ve all been through something,” said Sharlonda Buckman, an assistant superintendent who attended the meeting. “Part of recovery has to be deliberate work in spaces like this so we can be there for our children.”

With US support cash, colleges put greater concentrate on psychological well being

CHICAGO (AP) – Educators are opening an after-school mental health clinic in Kansas City, Kansas, staffed with school counselors and social workers. Schools in Paterson, New Jersey have set up socio-emotional learning teams to identify students dealing with crisis. Chicago sets up “mentoring teams” with a mission to help students in difficulty on its 500+ campuses.

With a stroke of luck in federal coronavirus relief funds, schools in the United States are using parts to quickly expand their capacity to deal with students’ mental health issues.

While the school districts have a lot of leeway in how to spend the aid, the urgency of the problem was evident Absenteeism, behavior problems, and quieter signs of stress So many students returned to school buildings for the first time since the coronavirus pandemic this fall.

In some school systems, the money has fueled longstanding trauma-coping work. Others have made new efforts to screen, counsel, and treat students. All in all, investment has put public schools at the center of efforts for the general welfare of students more than ever.

“In the last recession, with the last big chunk of recovery money, that conversation didn’t take place,” said Amanda Fitzgerald, assistant director of the American School Counselor Association. “Now the tone is very much geared towards the well-being of the students across the country.”

Last month, three major pediatric groups said the state of children’s mental health should be considered a national emergency. The US Department of Education has pointed out aid distribution to rethink how schools provide psychological support. Mental wellbeing, said Education Minister Miguel Cardona, must be the foundation for recovery from the pandemic.

Pandemic aid to schools is $ 190 billion, more than four times the amount the Department of Education typically spends annually on K-12 schools. Investments in mental health have gone into employee training, wellness screenings and curricula for social-emotional learning.

Questions remain, however, as to how schools will find ways to reap the benefits beyond the one-time cash injection, address privacy concerns, and track the effectiveness of their efforts. The implementation worries Katie Dockweiler, a Nevada school psychologist who sits on the state education committee.

“Not all programs are created equal,” she said. “It really depends on how it’s done, school by school. And there is a great deal of variability. “

She said the districts should develop ways to track the impact on students: “Otherwise we’ll just throw our money away.”

At the top of the list for many districts is the recruitment of new mental health specialists. When the National Association of School Psychologists surveyed members this fall, more than half of those polled said their districts intend to add social workers, psychologists or counselors, according to policy director Kelly Vaillancourt Strobach.

With $ 9.5 million in federal aid and outside grants, the Paterson Schools added five behavioral analysts, two substance abuse coordinators, and the teams to identify students in crisis situations.

In Paterson, one of the lowest-income parts of New Jersey, many of the 25,000 college students faced food insecurity prior to the pandemic and struggled after family members lost their jobs, Superintendent Eileen Shafer said.

“Before we tried to teach anything new, we wanted to make sure we could handle where our kids are based on what they’ve been through,” she said.

In rural Ellicottville, New York, where school psychologist Joe Prior sees more anxiety and a “marked increase” in panic attacks, the district plans to hire a life-saving agent to connect students with psychological help. But the position remains vacant as only a few have expressed interest.

“I have more students who just look into my eyes and say, ‘I’m completely overwhelmed and don’t know how to deal with it,'” said Erich Ploetz, Headmaster of Ellicottville High School.

It’s not the only district where hiring ambitions have exceeded the number of skilled workers available. Some districts have turned to outside providers to fill mental health positions while others are training existing staff.

The Kansas City, Kansas school system is using a portion of the $ 918,000 mental health grant to pay for social workers and counselors who are already on the job at the new afternoon clinic. The district has also added staff and mental health exams.

Angela Dunn, who leads mental health and suicide prevention initiatives for the 22,000 student district, said the mental health team has responded to 27 student deaths and 16 employee deaths since the pandemic began, double the number over that period typical. She said a handful of employees died from COVID-19, but many of the others were murders, suicides and overdoses.

Schools’ investments in student mental health services have raised some privacy concerns, particularly where schools are now monitoring student computers for distress signals or performing mental health tests on all students. But the notion that it’s not where schools can get involved at all has been forgotten.

“We just realized that students are comfortable seeking help in a school,” said Dunn.

Chicago, the third largest school district in the country, unveiled a “cure plan” for high school students using $ 24 million of its $ 2.6 billion in stimulus funds.

Over the course of three years, the district will expand “mentoring teams” – construction personnel who serve as the first response to students in difficulty – to each campus. 200 schools are to be reached by spring.

The headmistress Angélica Altamirano used some of these funds to open a room that is furnished with comfortable furniture and a used air hockey table. The campus center has already offered mourning groups for deceased students or friends and helped teachers deal with burnout.

In Topeka, Kansas, $ 100,000 was allocated for soothing items and sensory room personnel, including one at the Quincy Elementary. When students are so frustrated that they lay their heads on their desks, wander into the hallway, or cry, teachers can send them to the Roadrunner Room. There they can climb into a tent and snuggle under a weighted blanket, put together a puzzle, play with sand or build with Legos.

The Dean of Studies Andrea Keck observed how the room became a point of contact for a student in order to reduce frustrations.

“She can log it, have her hair pinned up, whatever she needs, and then she can be successful for the rest of the day,” says Keck, who oversees the room.

In Detroit, the district is spending $ 34 million on mental health initiatives, including screening high school students, expanding help from outside mental health providers, and providing additional support for parents.

Last Wednesday, that meant an hour-long meditation session for parents in a local coffee shop. One participant feared that her own stress was affecting her son’s ability to learn.

“As a community, we’ve all been through something,” said Sharlonda Buckman, an assistant superintendent who attended the meeting. “Part of recovery has to be deliberate work in spaces like this so we can be there for our children.”

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Thompson reported from Ellicottville, New York and Hollingsworth from Mission, Kansas. Chalkbeat writers Catherine Carrera in Newark, New Jersey, Cassie Walker Burke in Chicago and Lori Higgins in Detroit, and Associated Press writer Collin Binkley in Boston contributed to this report.

Northam Outlines 1st Proposal for A part of Federal Help Cash – NBC4 Washington

Virginia Governor Ralph Northam is calling for $ 353 million from the latest federal coronavirus relief act to fuel economic recovery efforts for small businesses and industries hit during the pandemic.

Northam announced the planned investments at a press conference on Monday, marking the first concrete proposal for Virginia’s $ 4.3 billion stake in the funding of the US rescue plan that it has published.

Northam and other Democrats who control the General Assembly had previously issued a joint statement outlining their common priorities for money with no specifics. Legislators will have a special session in Richmond next month to allocate funding.

Northam calls for $ 250 million for the Rebuild VA Economic Recovery Fund, which provides grants for small businesses and nonprofits. The demand for the program is great.

The governor also proposed $ 50 million for Virginia Tourism Corp. initiatives. and allocate $ 53 million to other small business programs, including a fund to boost industrial projects.

“With the American rescue plan, we have a unique opportunity to recover from the effects of the pandemic, revitalize our communities and invest in our common prosperity,” Northam said in a statement.

Other announced priorities for the Democrats are public health, rebuilding the state unemployment fund and accelerating broadband access.

Every Republican in Congress has voted against the comprehensive pandemic relief bill that President Joe Biden signed in March.

Israel, Hamas edge towards settlement on mechanism for Qatari help cash

Palestinian press reported yesterday that the UN approved a new mechanism to send Qatari aid funds to needy families in Gaza. In the past few years, Qatari envoys came to Israel every six months and drove from there to the Strip with suitcases full of cash. Once the money was in place, it was given to a representative of the families in need to be distributed at the post offices. According to reports, the new mechanism would result in the aid money being transferred to the strips through Palestinian banks in the West Bank under the supervision of the UN. This new mechanism would guarantee better control of money. It will only refer to charity funds, not the salaries of Gaza Strip officials. This solution was apparently promoted by the UN special envoy for the Tor Wensland region. The report also alleged that neither Israel nor Hamas objected to it.

The Lebanese newspaper Al-Akhbar published this morning that Hamas had agreed to one in talks with international and Qatari officials mechanism through which Qatari money would be distributed through Palestinian banks and under the supervision of the UN. Official Israeli sources unnamed yesterday said Israel’s army radio that the reports of such a new mechanism were not accurate. However, if such a mechanism is actually put in place, it should not only help combat the dire economic crisis in the Strip, but also lay the foundation for promoting an agreement between Israel and Hamas.

In recent years, the new Prime Minister Naftali Bennett and the new Finance Minister Avigdor Liberman have repeatedly voiced criticism of the suitcase-cash procedure and accused the then Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of financing the Hamas terrorism. That was actually the background too Liberman resigns 2018 from his position as Minister of Defense in the Netanyahu government. Israel’s new government has insisted that a new mechanism be put in place to transfer donations to Gaza through a UN fund. Such a fund would directly finance development projects in the strip, bypassing Hamas’ involvement, and preventing the money from being used to dig attack tunnels or manufacture weapons.

Although ready to negotiate, developments on the border over the past two weeks reflect the military strategy of the new Israeli government against any terrorist attacks from the Gaza Strip. The Israeli Air Force attacked July 3 Targets in Gaza and retaliatory strikes over fire balloons that were shot down from the Strip during the weekend. Targets included a Hamas rocket launcher and an arms factory. As early as July 1, IDF jets struck another Hamas arms factory in Gaza in response to the fire balloons launched on the same day.

Minister for Diaspora Affairs Nachman Shai said yesterday (July 4th): reacts more violently [than the Netanyahu government]. This is not a fixed formula for an air strike for everyone [incendiary] Balloon for an air force attack … Basically it is clear that Israel is not prepared to accept any violation of sovereignty – not even by one [arson] Balloon.”

surgery Guardian of the walls ended May 21 after Hamas and Islamic Jihad fired nearly 4,400 rockets at Israel over a twelve-day period. During these days of fighting, the IDF struck back and transported more than 1,500 targets from the two groups. A truce brokered by Egypt ended the fighting and offered a short-term solution. Since then, Egypt has been pushing for a long-term deal. Israeli commentator Tal Schneider reported On July 1, Cairo appointed the experienced mediator Ahmad Abd al-Khalek to its negotiating team, which Jerusalem sees as an intensified mediation effort and before an expected visit by Bennett to Washington. Although no date has been set for such a trip, President Joe Biden told visiting President Reuven Rivlin last week that he expected to meet the Israeli Prime Minister as soon as possible.

While the situation on the border with Gaza had deteriorated in recent days and more and more hot balloons ignited bushfires in the southern communities of Israel, Egypt appears to be continuing its mediation efforts to reach an agreement between the sides. A senior Israeli security delegation visited Cairo last week for mediated talks and is expected to return this week. The delegation included National Security Council official Nimrod Gez, Israel’s chief negotiator for the release of Israelis detained by Hamas Yaron Blum, and several other senior security officials.

As Prime Minister, Bennett had made it clear that a long-term deal with Hamas would have to include the return of the bodies of IDF soldiers Oron Shaul and Hadar Goldin to Israel and the release of the two Israeli civilians, Avraham Avera Mengistu and Hisham from Hamas. al-Sayed are being held. IDF seniors have said in recent days that any agreement to relax the restriction on the closure of Gaza must include progress on this issue. A Palestinian report last week said Israel could consent to the release of some sick Hamas prisoners in exchange for information on the physical and mental health of Israeli prisoners. Mediated talks are reportedly blocked in Israel as Hamas insists that prisoners responsible for the killing of Israelis also be included in the prisoner exchange.

Centerville units leisure district listening to on plan to assist companies, actual property, jobs, economic system, eating places

The proposed entertainment district spans about six blocks on 48 or Main Street Ohio and about five blocks on Franklin Street, records show.

The designation would support strategies for the city’s business development that call for a “high-end bar with music, a brewery … (and) unique restaurants,” according to the proposal.

The proposed district “would mirror the existing 113 acre Architectural Preservation District” and its approval would give access to 15 new liquor permits, Centerville records show.

Currently the city has fewer than five in that area, said Centerville Development Director Michael Norton-Smith.

ExploreBUSINESS: The Centerville entertainment district push calls for a $ 50 million investment