Patrick Vieira unique interview on reworking Crystal Palace’s taking part in model forward of Liverpool conflict | Soccer Information

The move started with a Joel Ward throw-in deep into Crystal Palace territory and ended, 58 seconds later, with Conor Gallagher firing an angled finish into the corner of the Brighton net.

In between, the ball traveled through every Palace player, including goalkeeper Jack Butland. The patient, 20-pass build-up carved Brighton open and while the goal was not enough to win the game, the mention of it still prompts a smile from Patrick Viera a week later.

“I knew it was a nice goal in terms of the build-up from the back, but I didn’t realize in the moment that every player had touched the ball because I was too into the game,” he tells Sky Sports. “It was good to see it back, because it shows the way we want to play.”

Vieira is speaking over Zoom from the club’s Beckenham headquarters, where, over the last six months, he has overseen a transformation. The Premier League table shows Palace in roughly the same position as last season. But, from personnel to playing style, pretty much everything else is different.

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Free to watch: Highlights from Crystal Palace’s 1-1 draw with Brighton

Vieira’s predecessor, Roy Hodgson, did fine work across his four-year tenure, providing stability in difficult circumstances and helping to establish Crystal Palace’s presence in the Premier League.

But the football was functional rather than thrilling and there was an appetite for change. Vieira came in with a remit to overhaul the team and modernize the style and that is precisely what he has done.

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Vieira has completely overhauled Crystal Palace’s playing style

“That was the direction of the chairman [Steve Parish] wanted to take and it is one of the reasons I am here as well because he understood the way I wanted the team to play,” he says.

“It was a risk, obviously, to change the style, and even more when you have that kind of transition of players, where you lose 12 and bring in eight young guys without much experience in the Premier League.

Sunday 23rd January 1:00pm

Kickoff 2:00pm


“So, when you are looking at what was going to be the first 10 games of the season [which included meetings with Chelsea, Tottenham, Liverpool, Arsenal and Manchester City], you see all the elements are there to have a difficult period.

“But with the support to implement my philosophy, and with the togetherness of the football club – and when I talk about togetherness, I am talking about the chairman, [sporting director] Dougie (Freedman), and the staff – we managed to get through it, allowing me to focus on the way I wanted to team to play.”

Vieira shakes his head immediately when asked if the scale of the task at hand made him think twice about taking the job – “I was really excited about coming,” he says – and Palace fans are glad he didn’t.

The 45-year-old, a three-time title-winner with Arsenal who cut his teeth as a coach at Manchester City’s academy before spells in charge of New York City FC and French side Nice, has instilled optimism in the stands and brought freshness on the pitch.

A raft of youthful summer signings, including Gallagher (21), Marc Guehi (21) and Michael Olise (20), has lowered the average age of the side by two years, and while Palace sit 11th in the Premier League table ahead of Sunday’s meeting with Liverpool, the underlying data ranks them as the eighth-best performers in the division.

Do the numbers offer encouragement to Vieira?

“When you look at the data side of things, you can say, ‘Yeah, we should be a little bit higher in the table’, and that’s positive,” he says. “But on the other side, it’s about trying to understand why you are not where you are supposed to be, or where you want to be.

“It’s about understanding and trying to find the things that will make us a better team so we can improve those kind of details to get better results. So, overall, yes, it’s positive, but it’s not enough for what I want. I will always be demanding and wanting more from the players because I believe they have the potential to do more.”

The main areas for improvement are clear to him.

“I would like the team to be more ruthless in both boxes,” says Vieira.

Michael Olise celebrates his goal against Leicester

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Michael Olise celebrates with James McArthur

“That means on the defensive side, but at the same time, when we are winning 1-0 and we have a couple of chances to score the second one, I want us to have that kind of ruthlessness to score the goal that would allow us to go two ahead.

“It is about having a maturity, and that comes with experience. Hopefully, in the second half of the season, it will be one of the areas we really improve, but it does take time to get to that.”

Vieira’s philosophy is vital to him. “I knew that if I decided to go into coaching,” he says, “this would be how I would like to see my teams play, because when I go to watch matches, I like this kind of intensity, possession and trying to play forward and score goals.”

But he is a pragmatist too. In October, he steered Palace to a 2-0 win at Manchester City with just 32 per cent possession. On Sunday against Liverpool, he knows they will need to be flexible again.

“The goal against Brighton is good because it highlights the way we want to play, but we are not going to score goals like that every weekend,” he says. “We need to understand that scoring in different ways is as important as scoring in that way.

“It’s important to be consistent with style, but at the same time it’s important to have the right gameplan depending on the team you are going to play. Obviously, if you want to have possession when you play against Manchester City, for example, you know that is… not impossible, but really difficult.

“So it is about knowing that and saying, ‘What are we going to do instead?’ That is another side of the game we need to improve as well, when we don’t have the ball.

“That is something we have to learn and we have to put more emphasis on that because those kinds of teams have the philosophy and the players, so it will be difficult to match them on that side.

“I’m not telling you we are going to change our philosophy, but we have to take into account the strength and the quality of the opposition team.”

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Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp praises Patrick Vieira’s impact at Palace

That certainly applies to Palace’s next opponents.

Liverpool’s 2-0 win over Vieira’s former club Arsenal on Thursday in the Carabao Cup semi-final showed they remain a formidable proposition even without Mohamed Salah and Sadio Mane but Crystal Palace will at least have the visceral support of a bouncing Selhurst Park behind them.

Under Vieira, they have accrued 71 per cent of their Premier League points there, and only lost twice – to Aston Villa and West Ham – in all competitions. The connection between fans and players feels stronger than ever this season.

“It’s massively important,” says Vieira. “Since I’ve been here, I really understand the relationship between the fans and the club and the players. There is a passion, there is caring, there is really a love that the fans show to the players, and I believe it is massively important for the players, staff and everyone to show that love back.

Conor Gallagher, Crystal Palace

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Conor Gallagher has become a fans’ favorite among Palace supporters

“One of the ways we can do that when we are on the field is to play with passion and love and determination, because those fans deserve that.”

Vieira uses Gallagher as an example. The Chelsea loanee has earned plaudits for his goals and assists this season but it is his work rate that has most endedeared him to the fans, according to his manager.

“I think the way that Conor plays reflects really well that connection we have with the fans,” says Vieira. “This is one of the reasons why he is one of the fans’ favorites as well. Those qualities are what our fans love, when players on the field play with enthusiasm, with happiness.

“Of course, they understand the game too. They know that making mistakes, passing the ball at the wrong time, is a part of the game. But what they want is for the players to play with soul and heart. I think they have been doing that fantastically well.”

Watch Crystal Palace vs Liverpool live on Sky Sports Premier League from 1pm on Sunday; kick off 2pm

Retail business presses forward with convention, tries to nudge normalcy

Visitors enter the venue for the NRF 2020 Vision: Retail’s Big Show held in New York, USA on January 12, 2020.

Wang Ying | Xinhua News Agency | Getty Images

“The big show will go on,” Matt Shay, president of the National Retail Federation, said Monday.

And on Friday, even as more speakers and attendees leave the conference, that remains the trade group’s plan.

The National Retail Federation will open its annual meeting in New York City this weekend. It is one of many annual conferences and fairs that ring in a new year in January each year. But with omicron Pushing Covid cases to new heights, conference planning has become complex and caused the industry to make tough decisions.

The JP Morgan Healthcare Conference – which attracts medical professionals, big pharma and healthcare startups – decided to hold its annual event virtually this week. CES 2022, a trade show organized by the Consumer Technology Association, continued with his event the previous week, albeit with smaller crowds. And the film industry said it is moving forward with plans to host the Berlin International Film Festival in person in February, while the Sundance Film Festival scheduled for later this month will be held virtually.

The decisions are symbolic in some cases, reflecting the challenges businesses face as companies try to push consumers toward more normalcy. Grocery stores and drugstores have kept their doors open and stores staffed during previous waves of the pandemic. Cinemas are trying win back audience, as some people have become shy about sitting next to strangers.

“As we move beyond the pandemic endemic, this year’s convention is a step forward in this new environment,” NRF said in a statement Friday. “It’s going to be a bit messy, no doubt, but it’s a step forward.”

There will be fewer opportunities for people to take their masks off, drink and socialize like there have been at conferences in the past. NRF recently decided to postpone two of its most important events — an awards gala and a more intimate dinner hosted by the NRF Foundation — to mid-April. The foundation sent personal communications to CEOs and honorees on Jan. 6 announcing the change. It has also indefinitely postponed a student program to coincide with the Big Show, which typically draws about 800 college-age attendees for education and networking.

NRF has announced increased security measures. In addition to requiring masks and vaccination certificates, there are plans to distribute N95 masks and Covid test kits to take home.

Similarly, the Berlin Film Festival said its event would have tighter restrictions and no parties.

Declining visitor numbers

The U.S. has been reporting an average of nearly 800,000 cases a day for the past week, more than triple the previous record set last winter, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. While cases of Omicron may be milder than previous strains of the virus, hospitalizations are also increasing, particularly in the last two weeks.

With this in mind, expected attendance at NRF’s Big Show has declined. Shay from NRF said Monday in a post on LinkedIn that the show will go on. He said the conference is expected to attract up to 20,000 attendees and 750 exhibitors. Around 40,000 people attended the Big Show in 2019.

Two days later, however, an NRF spokesman said there had been 15,000 confirmed participants.

Almost every day brought changes to the conference schedule. Jessica Albas Honest company confirmed last Friday that the company’s founder and CEO has stepped down from the lineup. Saks chief executive Marc Metrick resigned earlier this week. Both were keynote speakers at the event on the main stage.

aim said Friday that CEO Brian Cornell still plans to attend the event. He is scheduled to give a keynote and accept the trade group’s “Visionary” award. However, the company said it has cut travel for other employees planning to leave and is looking at opportunities to attend virtually.

A session with tapestry, Coach and Kate Spade’s parent company, is no longer on the three-day agenda. Meanwhile CEOs out Old Navy, stitch fix, lowes and north current have decided not to travel to the conference and will instead hold their sessions virtually.

executives out Macy’s, WW International (formerly Weight Watchers International), Victoria’s Secret, Authentic Brands Group and Coresight Research are expected to be present in person.

To date, NRF has not offered a virtual option for attendees or speakers who are not scheduled to be on the main stage at the Javits Center.

We believe that now is an appropriate time to get back together in some way. This is a time to start normalizing.

Stephanie Martz

General Counsel, National Retail Federation

In a Jan. 6 tweet, Future Commerce co-founder Phillip Jackson said, “NRF’s The Big Show is going to be more like The No Show.”

Because omicron is highly contagious, there are fears that an event that draws thousands of attendees could turn into a super-spreader event. Nearly 70 attendees, including some Samsung executives, tested positive for coronavirus after CES took place in Las Vegas last week. according to a Reuters report. It is not clear whether these attendees contracted Covid during the tech show or at external events such as a dinner at a restaurant.

The location of NRF’s big show, the Javits Center, is already believed to be the source of the first known case of omicron spread in the US, after clusters of cases were discovered among the roughly 53,000 people who gathered there for an anime conference in November.

‘Open for business’

The NRF is driving the conference forward as many retail workers earning minimum wage — or close to it — work in stores and warehouses every day. On the other hand, many of the industry’s top executives and corporate employees have been able to work from the comfort and security of their homes.

“The fact is, it’s really, really important for us to remember that our frontline retail associates have been working all the time and we’ve asked them to come into work and engage with customers,” said Stephanie Martz, the Chief Administrative Officer and General Counsel of NRF, in an interview on January 5.

She said vaccines, masks and other safety precautions have changed the game, both for the conference and for business operations in general.

“Individual companies are making the decisions that they are going to make themselves and we certainly don’t blame them if people are pulling out, but we think as a trade association representing retailers we should take advantage of the fact we are able to say that we believe the economy can and should be open for business,” she said.

“We believe now is an appropriate time to get back together in some way,” Martz added. “This is a time to start normalizing.”

NRF’s Shay stressed the importance of keeping businesses running despite the pandemic.

“We are encouraged by Mayor Eric Adams’ stated desire to keep New York City open,” Shay said in his LinkedIn post. “The overwhelming opinion of our members, exhibitors, retailers, partners and visitors is that we should move forward with the show. … This year’s show is a step forward and we believe it is necessary and worthwhile.”

Former physician for John Muir Well being says hospitals put cash forward of affected person security, cites baby’s loss of life

A former John Muir Health doctor alleges in a lawsuit that the nonprofit group, which operates hospitals in Walnut Creek and Concord, put money ahead of patient safety and ignored her warnings about surgical hazards that have resulted in illness and death.

Hospital officials dismissed the claims made by Dr. Alicia Kalamas in a lawsuit filed Wednesday in Contra Costa County Superior Court.

Kalamas, who worked at John Muir Health for eight years, said she has repeatedly raised red flags at executives about improper surgical practices, only to be ignored because she was viewed as a woman with “sharp elbows” or because officials feared that Changes that would signal past practices were dangerous.

In one example, she said she warned officials not to authorize complicated surgery on a child and told them other regional hospitals were better prepared to perform the surgery. But because the hospital group’s executives wanted to build a children’s brand, they ignored her concerns, she claims in the lawsuit. Surgeons from John Muir Health performed the surgery and the child died.

In their response to that claim, John Muir Health officials said Kalamas was not directly involved in the case and could not assess the “significant risks” of continuing or not having the surgery.

Kalamas, 50, of Piedmont, sued the nonprofit and its two top executives, Cal Knight, CEO of John Muir Health, and Taejoon Ahn, president and CEO of John Muir Medical Group, alleging the group violated its contract and forced her out of her position after labeling her a troublemaker.

“People at the top of the organization have lost their way,” Kalamas told The Chronicle. “They care more about the bottom line than patient safety.”

John Muir Medical Center on Wednesday, January 12, 2022 in Walnut Creek, California.

Santiago Mejia / The Chronicle

dr Russell Rodriguez, chief medical officer at John Muir Health, said that any feedback from employees is appreciated and that before executives decided not to renew Kalamas’ contract, they decided to restructure the program she administered to include “the better meet today’s patient needs”.

“The fact that the clinical consensus can differ from an individual physician’s views does not mean that he or she has been ignored,” Rodriguez said in a statement to The Chronicle. “Despite efforts to offer coaching and other support, Dr. Kalama’s reality and something she found difficult to understand and accept.”

He said that senior executives make patient safety their number one priority, noting that all the money John Muir Health makes is reinvested in the healthcare system.

Kalamas specializes in anesthesiology with a focus on perioperative medicine, which ensures that the many factors that influence surgical success – before, during and after an operation – are properly managed. In 2013, Kalamas was recruited from UCSF to join John Muir Health as medical director of the perioperative medicine program.

She quickly sought to fix the hospitals’ readmission rate for the highest-volume surgeries, which the lawsuit said was higher than the region’s 6.9% rate.

Her research found a simple problem, she says. When prescribing opiates as pain relievers after surgery, particularly for knee and hip replacements, there was no protocol to educate and provide medication to prevent constipation, resulting in patients returning to the hospital for a variety of issues.

“Millions of dollars were paid to JMH for failing to provide their patients with a 50-cent over-the-counter stool softener, a glass of water, and some basic advice,” Kalamas alleges in her lawsuit.

After her changes were implemented, the hospital saw a 27% decrease in readmissions for joint replacements, reducing costs for medical providers and taxpayers, she says.

Kalamas dealt with postoperative wound infections. Patients who have developed such infections are 60% more likely to be admitted to the ICU and five times more likely to be readmitted research. Yearly such problems costs the US health care system $3.5 to $10 billion.

In the past, John Muir Health has earned revenue from such complications and billed patients for the additional treatment, the lawsuit says. However, the federal government began to force the hospital to pay millions of dollars Punish, says Kalamas, eventually forcing it to improve. Still, Kalamas says executives and others ignored numerous emails she sent warning them that the lack of pre- and post-surgery blood glucose monitors was harming and killing patients.

The lawsuit cites an example of a diabetic who required a second operation after an infection. His heart wasn’t strong enough and he suffered a massive heart attack at home in front of his wife on the first day and later died, according to the lawsuit. Another young patient with kidney failure and diabetes did not have her blood sugar controlled and died shortly after receiving anesthesia; Her blood sugar was high when she coded, Kalamas says.

Rodriguez, John Muir’s chief medical officer, said eliminating postoperative wound infection is a “critical focus” and that restructuring the perioperative program will further reduce infections.

“Peroperative services needed to be made available to a larger proportion of the operated population, and care needed to be extended beyond the clinical setting,” he said.

Kalamas said her whistleblowing and criticism as a woman was bothersome or, as one manager told her, developed a reputation for “sharp elbows”.

“I’ve been in other institutions … and I’ve never felt dismissed,” Kalamas told The Chronicle. “I felt like at John Muir Health I was warning of very serious health and safety concerns and no one was paying attention.”

When she found out about the young child’s planned surgery, it fell outside of her area of ​​responsibility at the hospital, but she felt compelled to speak out, she says. Due to medical privacy laws, neither Kalamas nor her attorney, Dan Horowitz, could provide details about the child and the procedure.

“The case should have been referred to a qualified medical center, which Dr. Kalamas strongly encouraged her,” the lawsuit reads. “In particular, Dr. Kalamas told medical leadership that she had extensive experience with similar cases at UCSF and that JMH was massively underprepared.”

She said she told John Muir Health executives if they did the surgery it would be a “clean kill.”

After the child died, Kalamas requested a review of the case by the Medical Executive Committee, which could result in disciplinary action for those involved, disclosure to parents, and other safeguards. In a 2021 email shared with The Chronicle, Kalamas was informed that the case never went to the committee.

She recalled her earlier concerns about the surgery in an email, explaining how liver transplant and anesthesia experts agreed with her reservations.

“I was angry that JMH misrepresented the capabilities of their clinicians and the institutions’ ability to provide parents (redacted) with safe care given that UCSF, Stanford and Oakland Childrens’ are all much better equipped to to handle cases of this complexity,” she wrote. She added that she was told that John Muir health officials wanted their new pediatric center and needed to avoid disruption.

Horowitz said the child’s parents are still unaware of Kalamas’ concerns to this day.

In response to the pediatric death, Rodriguez said some cases had “extremely advanced life-threatening conditions for which any intervention is a high risk and not having an intervention is also a high risk.” He said all options were discussed with the family before the operation and since Kalamas is not part of the treatment team she would not know all the details.

He said a post-case review was conducted through the peer review process, but Kalamas would not be aware of any assessment as it is confidential.

As of May 31, 2021, Kalamas said her contract was allowed to expire. Since then she has not returned to a hospital.

Matthias Gafni is a contributor to the San Francisco Chronicle. E-mail: matthias.gafni@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @mgafni

Covid instances rise but once more in U.S. forward of Thanksgiving vacation

One resident sorts her free groceries while another works in the pantry of the Fourth Presbyterian Church amid the ongoing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in Boston, Massachusetts, Jan.

Brian Snyder | Reuters

Doctors urge caution to prevent Covid-19 outbreaks as cases surge across the country after a plateau lasting nearly three weeks and Americans prepare to celebrate Thanksgiving with friends and family next week.

According to a CNBC analysis of data from Johns Hopkins University, the US reported a seven-day average of nearly 95,000 new Covid infections on Thursday, up 31% over the past two weeks. Cases across the country declined for weeks this fall before fluctuating between 70,000 and 75,000 a day from late October, more than 50% less than the peak of the delta surge that devastated the US this summer.

But as the holiday season approaches and the cold weather pushes more people to meet indoors, public health officials are hoping to mitigate another record-breaking wave of Covid this winter. Last Christmas preceded the country’s worst spike in covid ever, with cases peaking at more than 250,000 a day on Jan. 11. Deaths from the virus also hit a pandemic high of around 3,400 a day in early 2021.

The combination of Thanksgiving, Christmas and plummeting temperatures makes this time of year “the perfect storm” for Covid, said Dr. Bruce Farber, chief infectious disease at Northwell Health in New York, told CNBC.

Infectious Disease Specialists largely agree that it is safe to celebrate the holidays with friends and family as long as everyone is vaccinated against Covid. but a new study from Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center found that half of respondents at their gatherings would not ask about guests’ vaccination status, and about 54% said they would not require unvaccinated partygoers to test negative for the virus.

“I wouldn’t allow anyone to go to Thanksgiving if they weren’t vaccinated,” Farber said. “I think that should be the price you pay.”

As the effectiveness of Covid vaccine doses has been shown to wear off over time, Farber advised fully vaccinated individuals to get their booster vaccinations for extra protection during the holidays. The Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved the Pfizer and Moderna booster vaccinations for all adults in the United States.

People vaccinated in the earliest stages of introduction are prone to breakthrough infections, said Dr. Reynold Panettieri, Vice Chancellor of Translational Medicine and Science at Rutgers University.

“I expect we’ll see an upward trend in and around the holidays just because people get together with more exposures,” said Panettieri. He noted, however, that advances in vaccination and treatment options mean that an outbreak this winter “will now be far from what it was before”.

A downward trend in Covid hospital admissions and deaths, which typically delays reported case numbers for a few weeks or more as people contract the virus and then get sick enough to need urgent help, is showing signs of flattening. About 48,000 Americans are currently hospitalized with the virus, the same level as two weeks ago, based on a seven-day average from Health Department data. And the daily average of roughly 1,200 reported deaths tracked by Hopkins is showing signs of an increase after barely changing for two weeks.

Outbreaks in the Midwest and Northeast, where cases have increased 56% and 47% in the past two weeks, seem to be driving the national numbers. Hospital admissions there rose by 20% and 7%, respectively.

The very dense cities of the northeast and the colder temperatures in the Midwest – compared to the south, where the falls have collapsed due to the more pleasant weather – could help explain these regional differences, Panettieri noted.

“The weather is driving people indoors and interest in more indoor activity could certainly add to the experience,” said Panettieri.

Panettieri said those who gather for Thanksgiving should know if their fellow attendees have been careful to avoid exposure to Covid, in addition to getting vaccinations and refreshments. But even with the risk of another outbreak this winter, advances in immunizations and natural immunity in those infected with Covid during the delta surge have made the US “much better” this Thanksgiving than it did last, Dr. Arturo Casadevall, Chair of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, told CNBC in an email.

“Of course, if people have any respiratory symptoms like colds or flu-like illnesses, they need to rule out COVID-19 by getting tested before meeting with loved ones,” Casadevall wrote. “Common sense, caution, and vaccinations are great recipes for a safer vacation.”

Larger restaurant wages whack earnings—some warn extra ache continues to be forward

Employees prepare orders for customers at a Chipotle Mexican Grill restaurant in Hollywood, California.

Patrick T. Fallon | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Customers are returning to restaurants in droves, but workers are not, putting even more pressure on fast food chains to hold market share and protect profits while navigating a tight labor market.

In the past two weeks, restaurant managers have painted a bleak picture of the personnel challenges investors face in their profit calls. CEOs like Domino’s Pizza Ritch Allison, Chipotle Mexican Grills Brian Nickol and MC Donalds Chris Kempczinski shared how restaurants have cut opening times, restricted ordering methods, and lost sales because they couldn’t find enough workers. Some chains have been hit harder by the labor shortage, such as Brands International’s restaurant Popeyes, that saw about 40% of its dining rooms closed due to lack of staff.

“Here we separate the wheat from the chaff,” says Kevin McCarthy, an analyst at Neuberger Berman.

Raising wages is a popular approach to personnel problems, although not a perfect solution. McDonald’s wages at its franchise restaurants have risen about 10% so far this year to attract workers. Higher labor costs have resulted in higher menu prices, up about 6% year over year, according to McDonald’s executives.

Starbucks plans to spend around $ 1 billion on improving services for its baristas in fiscal 2021 and 2022, including two planned wage increases. The decision reduced the earnings forecast for fiscal year 2022, disappointing investors and save $ 8 billion in market cap. McCarthy believes, however, that more companies should take a page out of the company’s playbook and invest in their people.

“The stock is in the red, but I think they are a winner. Big step on your part, definitely the right decision in the long run,” he said.

McCarthy said he expected restaurant businesses to lose about 5 points in traffic due to staff shortages.

Looking ahead to the rest of 2021 and into 2022, most publicly traded restaurants expect the problem to persist for at least a few more quarters. Texas Roadhouse CEO Gerald Morgan told analysts on Thursday that there are “a bit” more people in the pool of applicants, but he still believes there is still a long way to go before the company has enough people to meet demand.

Mark Kalinowski, founder of Kalinowski Equity Research, said executives at privately owned restaurant companies are more pessimistic about the timing of the labor market recovery.

“When high-ranking people in private companies say it is getting worse, it usually is,” Kalinowski said.

He has slashed estimates for Starbucks’ fiscal 2022 results and Domino’s U.S. revenue growth for the next quarter, according to the company’s latest earnings reports.

“Not every company will inevitably see a change in its sales forecast, but the margin side has to be considered more closely, especially for concepts that have 100% company-owned locations in the US or are primarily company transactions,” said Kalinowski.

Kalinowski said he prefers stocks with a higher concentration of franchise restaurants. McDonald’s, for example, only operates 5% of its US locations, while the rest is operated by franchisees.

More restaurant income is still ahead. Owner of an outback steakhouse Bloomin ‘brands, Wing stop and Applebees owners Your brands and IHOP parents Your brands are among the companies expected to release their latest results next week. Some analysts, like Wedbush Securities’s Nick Setyan, have revised their estimates in light of earnings reports from peer companies.

Covid vaccination charge forward of Nov tourism reopening

Tourist sitting on a swing on a beach in Thailand.

© Marco Bottigelli | Moment | Getty Images

Next Monday, Thailand will lift quarantine restrictions on travelers from more than 40 countries who have been fully vaccinated – even though less than half of its population has been fully vaccinated. // Added mention of travelers who need to be “fully vaccinated”

According to Our World in Data, only about 42% of the Thai population had been fully vaccinated against Covid-19 by October 27. In comparison, other countries in the region such as Cambodia, Malaysia and Singapore have had more than 70% of their population fully vaccinated against Covid.

The three Southeast Asian nations as well as Australia and China are there Thailand’s List of Approved Countriesas the country prepares to reopen to tourists on November 1st.

After this First announcement of the plan by the Thai Prime Minister in early October, Bank of America economists said it was good news for Thailand’s tourism sector, economic recovery and currency – but they found it was “not without risk.”

As has been shown in the other countries, the vaccination rate, especially in the Delta variant, is far too low to prevent an outbreak.

“Despite an impressive and admirable vaccination effort, full vaccination remains relatively low and inconsistent,” said the economists. “As can be seen in the other countries, the vaccination rate, especially for the Delta variant, is far too low to prevent an outbreak.”

Still, they said a lockdown is unlikely, given the country’s high risk tolerance, unless the capacity of the country’s intensive care unit is overwhelmed.

Due to uneven vaccination rates across the country, the data available may not clearly reflect vaccination rates in places like the capital, Bangkok. The Deputy Governor of the Bangkok City Council recently told Singapore-based media company CNA that 75% of the residents were vaccinated with the second dose.

The importance of tourism to Thailand

Among the economies in the region, Thailand is one of the most tourism-dependent economies, with the sector accounting for around 21% of GDP in 2019, according to Sian Fenner of Oxford Economics.

“Travel restrictions come with enormous economic and social costs and are a major reason Thailand’s economic recovery is lagging behind many of its competitors in the region,” said Fenner, chief Asian economist for the global consultancy.

… we do not expect domestic travel to fully recover to pre-Covid levels until 2025.

Sian Fenner

Senior Economist, Asia, Oxford Economics

“We believe that the government’s reopening of the borders, even though only about 40% of the population is fully vaccinated, reflects the country’s significant reliance on foreign tourists,” said Charnon Boonnuch, an economist at Nomura.

According to the government, the Thai economy grew by 7.5% year-on-year in the second quarter. This level of growth lagged behind other regional economies such as Malaysia, Singapore and the Philippines, which grew between 11.8% and 16.1%.

Oxford Economics is forecasting GDP growth of 1.8% for Thailand this year for the full year, while Nomura is forecasting Thailand’s GDP growth of 0.6% in 2021.

International travelers are not expected to return immediately, however, as visitors may still face quarantine regulations in their home countries, according to economists.

“We expect incoming tourism to recover in 2022, but even then we still expect international arrivals to be 66% below 2019 levels,” said Fenner. “In fact, we don’t expect domestic travel to fully recover to pre-Covid levels until 2025.”

Meanwhile, Bank of America economists highlighted that Chinese tourists – who made up about a quarter of Thai tourist arrivals in 2019 – are not expected to return until the latter half of 2022.

China has largely closed its borders to international travel since last year and continues to have a strict zero-covid strategy that has resulted in mass lockdowns, even with few infections reported.

Other parts of Southeast Asia are also looking to reopen their borders to international visitors, which, according to Nomura’s Boonnuch, has likely contributed to Thailand welcoming tourists again.

“The need to reopen has also increased due to increased competition from neighboring countries that have relaxed border rules, such as Singapore, which has a much higher full vaccination rate of 85%,” he said.

Singapore has announced vaccinated itinerary agreements with several countries including the US and UK, while Malaysia’s Tourism Minister told CNBC last week that the Country could reopen its borders to international tourists in November.

Correction: This story has been updated to accurately reflect the Bank of America note came out in early October following the Prime Minister’s announcement.

What GM, Ford traders ought to know forward of third-quarter earnings

General Motors’ global headquarters are located in the Renaissance Center in Detroit.

Paul Hennessy | LightRakete | Getty Images

DETROIT – both General Motors and Ford engine are expected to report solid third-quarter results on Wednesday despite an ongoing global disruption in supply chains, including a shortage of semiconductor chips that have depleted vehicle inventories but increased profits this year.

Both Detroit automakers did their best during the disruptions, allowing them to raise their earnings expectations for the year on record vehicle prices and earnings amid surprisingly robust consumer demand. According to analysts, this is likely to be an ongoing trend as the auto industry rebuilds inventory levels as more productions come back online in the coming weeks and quarters.

“Both should not only benefit from favorable fundamentals in an upward cyclical environment, but both have a significant opportunity to improve the perception of their long-term positioning in an EV / AV world,” Credit Suisse analyst Dan Levy said last week in an investor announcement.

Here’s what Wall Street analysts expect from every automaker’s third quarter results, as well as other things investors should know before GM reports ahead of Wednesday’s market opening, followed by Ford after the market closes.

Wall Street estimates

Analyst estimates from Refinitiv assume that GM will post earnings per share of 96 cents and sales of 26.5 billion US dollars, 25.3% less than last year.

According to Refinitiv, Ford will have earnings per share of 27 cents on auto sales of $ 32.5 billion, down 6.2%.

Expectations for the second half of the year

GM previously warned investors that its North American wholesale volume decreased by about 200,000 units in the second half of 2021 compared to the first half of the year. The company has maintained its financial guidance for the year, including adjusted earnings between $ 11.5 billion and $ 13.5 billion, or $ 5.40 to $ 6.40 per share. It made around $ 6.2 billion, or $ 4.21 per share, for the first six months of the year.

GM anticipates a $ 3.5 billion to $ 4.5 billion plunge in the second half of the year due to a $ 1.5 billion to $ 2 billion increase in raw material costs and lower revenue from its financial sector.

In July, Ford raised its guidance for the year, but informed investors that the second half of the year would be weaker than the first in terms of operating profit, which stood at $ 5.9 billion through June. At the time, the company raised its forecast for adjusted earnings before taxes for the full year by approximately $ 3.5 billion to $ 9 billion to $ 10 billion.

Deutsche Bank analyst Emmanuel Rosner assumes that both automakers will head towards the upper end of their previous ranges, if not even above.

“We expect both Ford and GM to beat consensus third quarter estimates and maintain / raise annual guidance. In addition, we see several potential catalysts on the horizon for both companies, ”he said in an investor note on Monday, citing electric and autonomous vehicle developments.

EVs / AVs

While automakers are pouring billions into electric and autonomous vehicles, the segment won’t add much to third-quarter earnings.

Both automakers released key new details last quarter about their plans for both emerging sectors, including a $ 11 billion investment by Ford in U.S. electric vehicle and battery manufacturing facilities.

GM clearly outlined financial goals like doubling sales and increasing profit margins to 12% to 14% by 2030 on an Investors Day earlier this month. The majority-owned subsidiary Cruise also said it is expected to begin charging a robot taxi service as early as next year in San Francisco pending final regulatory approval.

During the quarter, GM also said it would recognize an estimated rebound in the third quarter that included $ 1.9 billion of $ 2.0 billion in costs related to an ongoing recall of its Chevrolet Bolt EVs as part of a settlement with LG will make up for the defective batteries.

Partial structures

Ford stock is up about 80% this year, so investors will be looking for additional charges on the automaker over the next year.

You’ll also want to see any updates on the production and shipping of Ford’s F-series pickups, some of which automakers, like GM, built to get ready when chips become available.

Steve Carlisle, GM’s North American CEO, last week completed more than half the delivery of the newly assembled pickups he parked due to a shortage of semiconductor chips, according to Reuters.

When GM reported a 32.8% year-over-year sales decline for the third quarter earlier this month, GM said the semiconductor chip market had improved. November 1st is expected to be the first time since February that none of GM’s North American assembly plants will shut down due to chip shortages. However, two remain off to be retooled, and some work in fewer shifts.

GM stock is up about 40% in 2021.

– CNBCs Michael Bloom contributed to this report.

FDA scientists strike favorable tone forward of vote this week

The Janssen Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine.

Allen J. Cockroaches | Los Angeles Times | Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration staff adopted a more favorable tone on Wednesday Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 booster vaccination, which states that giving a second dose two months after the first vaccination may be beneficial.

However, staff admitted that data to support boosters was limited and the agency has not yet verified all of the information.

“Although not independently confirmed by the FDA from independent datasets, summaries of the data suggest that a second dose administered approximately 2 months after the primary dose may have a benefit compared to efficacy in the pivotal study COV3001,” they wrote in a 54-page document published on Wednesday.

They also said that a J&J dose was consistently less effective than the Pfizer and Moderna mRNA vaccines in both clinical trials and real-world trials.

“The highest effectiveness estimates (including for more severe COVID-19 illnesses) in clinical trials and real-world effectiveness studies evaluating the Janssen COVID-19 vaccine are consistently below the highest effectiveness estimates for the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines,” they said.

Overall, the data shows that the J&J single-shot vaccine “still offers protection from severe COVID-19 illness and death in the United States”.

The report by FDA scientists is set to brief the agency’s Advisory Committee on Vaccines and Related Biological Products, which will meet on Friday to discuss data on the safety and effectiveness of a second J&J syringe in adults. The published documents give an insight into the agency’s perspective on additional recordings.

Unlike Pfizer and Moderna’s two-step mRNA vaccines, J&J hoped to offer a one-shot solution that would protect the public adequately to contribute to the Coronavirus pandemic. But its 72% protection in the US was viewed by some as inferior to the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines, both of which touted efficacy rates of over 90%.

A second dose of J & J’s Shot provides similar performance to the mRNA vaccines and increases protection against symptomatic infection to 94% when given two months after the first dose in the United States, according to company data released Sept. 21 became. J&J, the a. used modified adenovirus In order to trigger an immune response, the agency asked on October 5 for approval of a booster dose of its single-dose vaccine for people aged 18 and over.

However, in the documents released on Wednesday, FDA scientists suggested that there wasn’t enough data on the elderly or the fast-paced Delta variant to draw any conclusion about the benefits of boosters.

They said the sample size J&J provided for people 60 years and older “limits the possibility of inferring an increase in efficacy after the second dose in this group.”

“Finally, the small number of defendants who have been confirmed to be caused by the Delta variant precludes any conclusion as to effectiveness against the variant,” they added.

Staff said no new safety issues were observed after a second dose given two or three months after the first dose, but noted that it is currently unknown “if after” an increased risk of these or other side effects there is an additional dose.

The FDA advisory group is due to discuss data on the safety and effectiveness of booster vaccinations for Moderna in adults on Thursday and J&J on Friday. The agency could make a final decision within days of the meetings and hand it over to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and their Vaccine Advisory Committee, expected to make their own decision next week.

FDA scientist refused to take a stand whether on Tuesday, in an unusual move, booster shots of the Covid vaccine from Moderna will be supported, with the data showing that currently approved vaccines in the US still protect against serious illness and death

Last month, US regulators authorized Covid booster recordings from Pfizer and BioNTechs Vaccine for a wide variety of Americans, including the elderly, adults with pre-existing conditions, and those who work or live in high-risk environments such as health and food workers.

Norman Baylor, former director of the FDA’s vaccines office, said last week that he did not recommend presenting Moderna’s vaccine to an advisory committee because it uses a similar platform to Pfizer’s vaccination, which has already been approved for booster vaccination. J&J is different, however.

It “gets a little trickier” because a second dose of J & J’s vaccine appears to work “extremely well,” Baylor said. “Maybe it should have been a two-dose [vaccine] at the beginning.”

‘Robust’ to satisfy local weather finance targets forward of COP26, Johnson says

September 19, 2021: Prime Minister Boris Johnson climbs aboard the RAF Voyager at Stansted Airport prior to a visit to the United States.

Stefan Rousseau – PA Pictures | PA pictures | Getty Images

There is a six-in-ten chance of reaching an agreement on climate finance ahead of the upcoming COP26 climate change summit, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson said.

In remarks to the media during his trip to New York over the weekend, Johnson was asked if he had any commitments related to climate finance as well according to the BBC, Environmental goals in the next few days.

“Getting everything ready this week will be a chore,” he is reported to have said. “But I think it’s all done by the COP, six out of 10. It’s going to be tough, but people need to understand that this is vital to the world.”

Financial discussions will be a key part of COP26, which will be held from October 31st to November 12th in the UK’s Scottish city of Glasgow.

According to the United Nations, the industrialized nations had previously announced that they would “collectively mobilize 100 billion US dollars per year by 2020 to support climate protection in developing countries”.

This goal is proving to be a challenge. Last week, the OECD said that climate finance provided and mobilized by developed countries amounted to $ 79.6 billion in 2019. This is an increase from $ 78.3 billion in 2018, but is still below the $ 100 billion.

“The limited progress in the total volume of climate finance between 2018 and 2019 is disappointing, especially before COP26,” said Mathias Cormann, Secretary General of the OECD, in a statement on the figures.

“Even if appropriately verified data for 2020 will not be available until the beginning of next year, it is clear that climate finance is lagging far behind its target,” said Cormann. “More needs to be done.”

Johnson’s remarks were made public by a number of media outlets, and the BBC aired an excerpt from the discussion on Monday morning. Johnson said Britain made a “big, big promise” and “cut our carbon a lot,” but it needs other countries to get going.

“We’ve been issuing for centuries and these emerging economies are saying, ‘Well why should we pay such a high price?’ The 100 billion US dollars that we have to raise each year are therefore used to support these countries [to] make the transition. ”

The UK’s official website for COP26 states that it will “bring parties together to accelerate action to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change”.

Described by the United Nations as a legally binding international treaty on climate change, the Paris Agreement aims to “limit global warming to well below 2, preferably 1.5 degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels”.

On Monday, Johnson and UN Secretary General António Guterres will hold an “informal round table of heads of state and government on climate protection”.

Oil companies lower U.S. Gulf of Mexico output by 91% forward of Hurricane Ida

Oil companies on Saturday cut nearly 91% of US crude oil production in the Gulf of Mexico, approximately 1.65 million barrels as Hurricane Ida is heading for large U.S. offshore oil fields, according to the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement.

The regulator also estimated that approximately 84.87% of natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico has been shut down.

Ida is expected to hit a Category 4 hurricane before making landfall west of New Orleans. Louisiana residents on Saturday hurried to prepare for the stormthat could bring winds of up to 225 km / h when it hits land.

Oil and gas companies evacuated 279 production platforms, representing 49.82% of the 560 manned platforms in the Gulf of Mexico, and stopped nearly 91% of their typical offshore production as the storm approached, according to the offshore regulator.

The companies also moved 11 drillships off the site and out of the storm’s path on Saturday.

The Gulf of Mexico’s offshore oil production accounts for 17% of the country’s crude oil production and 5% of the state’s offshore dry gas production. corresponding the US Energy Information Agency.

Andrew Lipow, president of Lipow Oil Associates in Houston, said Saturday that gas prices in the southeast and mid-Atlantic markets would likely rise by about 10 cents a gallon if a Category 4 storm hit New Orleans refineries directly.