NFL star Alvin Kamara switches brokers, leaving powerhouse Klutch Sports activities Group

Alvin Kamara # 41 of the New Orleans Saints runs the ball during a game against the Tennessee Titans at Nissan Stadium on December 22, 2019 in Nashville, Tennessee.

Wesley Hitt | Getty Images

The running back of the National Football League, Alvin Kamara, has changed agents again.

The New Orleans Saints star left powerhouse agency Klutch Sports Group – home of National Basketball Association superstar LeBron James – and worked with Atlanta-based Quality Control Sports Management. According to NFL Players Association guidelines, players who change agents must notify the union by letter and wait five business days before the transaction is official.

On your website, Quality control offers Kamara and other NFL players. Los Angeles Rams Wideout DeSean Jackson is part of the company’s stable after taking over Terra Firma Sports Management Last June. Kamara had relationships with quality control officials prior to joining the NFL in 2017.

Quality Control also represents major league baseball players and is a music industry powerhouse with a history of managing global artists including Cardi B and hip hop group Migos.

Kamara, 26, is under contract with the Saints until at least 2025 after she approves five years, $ 75 million complete in September last year. The deal has been negotiated, but Klutch is the second highest contract in the NFL among running backs, just behind Ezekiel Elliott of the Dallas Cowboys, who has a $ 90 million deal.

Klutch landed Kamara in 2020 after the agency bought Revolution Sports to help launch their Football department. Kamara was represented by Klutch agent Damarius Bilbo, and the company is led by prominent NBA agent Rich Paul, who serves as the company’s CEO. Klutch operates under the entertainment company United Talent Agency after investing in 2019.

New Orleans Saints running back Alvin Kamara

Chris Graythen | Getty Images Sports | Getty Images

Paul is one of the most influential agents in the NBA, especially since he represents the game’s biggest star, James. He also represents top players like Los Angeles Lakers forward Anthony Davis, Atlanta Hawks star Trae Young, Draymond Green of the Golden State Warriors and most recently Chicago Bulls security guard Zach LaVine, who had a breakout season Has.

Klutch was founded in 2012 and has now raised more than $ 1 billion in contracts under management. But the agency is also under fire from a former client who accuses negligence.

Last month the New York Knicks Center filed a lawsuit against Nerlens Noel against Paul and Klutch, claims he lost $ 58 million in profit after joining the agency in 2017. After failing to land a lucrative NBA contract, Noel left Klutch last year.

The agency is also in the headlines as it represents Philadelphia 76ers star Ben Simmons, the subject of trade rumors after falling out of favor with the franchise. CNBC reached out to Paul on Friday for comment, but he didn’t respond until this article was published.

Kamara stormed for 3,340 yards and 43 touchdowns in 60 career games with the Saints. In its fifth season, Kamara is the biggest star in the franchise after Drew Brees’ retirement. The Saints start their 2021 season against the Green Bay Packers on Sunday.

The article has been updated to reflect Kamara’s previous relationship with quality control and to list his direct representative during his time at Klutch.

DEA warns scammers are impersonating brokers, demanding cash for faux drug busts

DETROIT – The Drug Enforcement Administration warns the public of a widespread fraud program in which phone scammers impersonate DEA agents to extort money or steal personal information.

The federal office says there are different variations in the scheme. Scammers could try to convince victims that their name was used to rent a vehicle that was stopped at the border and contained a large amount of drugs.

The caller then has the victim check their social security number or inform them that their bank account has been compromised.

In other cases, the scammer threatens the target with fictitious drug seizure arrest and calls the individual to send money by gift card or wire transfer to pay a “fine” or to help investigate or reset their bank account.

Part of an actual scam call was captured by DEA and can be heard Here. The public can also check out the PPE below to help raise awareness that the DEA will never ask for money or ask for personal information over the phone.

“Our office receives 3 to 5 calls a month from people around the country, often soon after they have called these scammers,” said Keith Martin, special agent for the Detroit Field Division. “DEA employees will never phone members of the public or doctors to ask for money or any other form of payment.

“DEA will never solicit personal or sensitive information over the phone and will only notify people in person or by official letter of a legitimate investigation or legal action. In fact, no legitimate federal law enforcement officer is going to ask for cash or gift cards from a member of the public. “

The DEA says scammers have gone so far as to forge legitimate DEA phone numbers to convince their target that the call is legitimate, or text photos of what appears to be a legitimate law enforcement card with a photo on it.

Other common tactics scammers will use, according to the DEA, include:

  • Use an urgent and aggressive tone and refuse to speak to or leave a message with anyone other than the victim.
  • threats to arrest, prosecute, detain and, in the case of doctors and pharmacists, to withdraw their DEA registration;
  • Claim thousands of dollars by wire transfer or untraceable gift card numbers for the victim to provide over the phone.
  • ask for personal information such as social security number or date of birth;
  • When calling a doctor, refer to national provider numbers and / or state license numbers. You can also claim that patients are making allegations against this practitioner.

Imitating a federal agent is a violation of federal law that can be punished with a prison sentence of up to three years. In the case of escalated identity theft, a prison sentence of at least two years plus fines and reimbursement is imposed.

DEA Warns of Phone Scammers Impersonating Brokers and Demanding Cash – Pasadena Now

The Drug Enforcement Administration warned late last week that phone scammers were posing as DEA agents with the aim of extorting money or stealing personal information.

A new public announcement says the DEA will never call to ask for money or ask for personal information.

There are differences in the false narrative, including that the target’s name was used to rent a vehicle that was stopped at the border and contained a large amount of drugs, the DEA said.

The caller then has the target verify their social security number or claim that their bank account has been compromised.

In some cases, the caller threatens the target with fictitious drug seizure arrest and instructs the person over the phone to send money by gift card or wire transfer to pay a “fine” or to help investigate or reset their bank account.

In addition, scammers have “forged” legitimate DEA phone numbers to convince their target that the call was legitimate – or text photos of what appear to be legitimate law enforcement cards with a photo.

Reported scam tactics are constantly changing, but they often share many of the same characteristics. Callers use fake names and ID numbers, as well as names of known DEA officers or police officers in local departments.

Anyone who receives a call from someone claiming to be with DEA ​​should report the incident to the FBI at www.ic3.gov.

Additionally, the Federal Trade Commission offers recovery steps, shares information with more than 3,000 law enforcement agencies, and accepts reports reportfraud.ftc.gov.

For more information about identity theft protection, see www.identitytheft.gov.

Reporting these scam calls helps federal agencies find, arrest, and stop the criminals involved in this scam.

Imitating a federal agent is a violation of federal law that can be punished with a prison sentence of up to three years. In the case of escalated identity theft, a prison sentence of at least two years plus fines and reimbursement is imposed.

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