Cowl that purple nostril! Circus pageant adapts to virus guidelines | Leisure




The dancers from left to right, Joaquin Medina Caligari from Uruguay, Tasha Petersen from Argentina, Valentino Martinetti from Argentina, Marius Fouilland from France and Lucille Chalopin from Paris from the Eolienne company play “Le Lac des Cygnes” by Florence Caillon, based on Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake during BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, South of France, Thursday February 4, 2021. The fourth edition of the Global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts can flourish between the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts who are behind the legendary spectacle.




The French tightrope walker Tatiana-Mosio Bongoga presents her documentary about her performance on a 400-meter tightrope walker, which was hung at a height of 40 meters without protection over the Vltava River in Prague in 2019 during the BIAC, International Circus Art Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Wednesday February 3, 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The actors Pauline Barboux and Jeanne Ragu from the Libertivore Company present their show “Ether” directed by Fanny Soriano during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, south of France, Wednesday 3rd February 2021. It was a tough year for the performing arts in most countries, with virus bans canceling shows and formwork locations. But the world’s best circus festival has found a way to thrive between the cracks of the rules – even without the large crowds that would normally have been around.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Dancers play “Parallèle 26”, a creation by the French choreographer Sylvie Guillermin with the circus company Archaos, which shows student acrobats and dancers in the Theater de La Criee during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, on Friday, February 5th , 2021. The fourth edition of the Global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive among the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Sylvie Guillermin, choreographer of “Parallèle 26”, a creation by the Archaos circus company with student acrobats and dancers, prepares the stage in the Theater de La Criee during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Friday February. 5, 2021. The fourth edition of the Global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive between the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Sylvie Guillermin, choreographer of “Parallèle 26”, a creation by the Archaos circus company with student acrobats and dancers, prepares the stage in the Theater de La Criee during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Friday February. 5, 2021. It’s been a tough year for the performing arts in most countries. Virus locks have canceled shows and shuttering locations. But the world’s best circus festival has found a way to thrive between the cracks of the rules – even without the large crowds that would normally have been around.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The dancers from left to right, Tasha Petersen from Argentina, Lucille Chalopin from Paris, Marius Fouilland from France and Joaquin Medina Caligari from Uruguay from the Eolienne company play “Le Lac des Cygnes” by Florence Caillon on the basis of Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake the BIAC, International circus arts biennial, in Marseille, south of France, Thursday 4th February 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The dancers Tasha Petersen from Argentina (above) and Joaquin Medina Caligari from Uruguay from the Eolienne company prepare for the performance of “Le Lac des Cygnes” by Florence Caillon based on Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, before. South of France, Thursday February 4, 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The dancer Marius Fouilland from France of the Eolienne company prepares before the presentation of “Le Lac des Cygnes” by Florence Caillon on Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, on Thursday, February 4th , based on 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The backstage room at The Docks Des Suds is empty with a plaque reading “Emergency Exit” during the BIAC, International Circus Art Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday, February 4, 2021. The fourth edition of the Global Die Circus Biennale demonstrates how the performing arts can thrive between the rifts, and celebrates the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The Brazilian performer Alice Rende prepares for the performance of “Passages”, a contortionism creation in a space delimited by a Plexiglas box during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday, February 4, 2021. The Die fourth edition of the global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive among the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

A banner announces the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, which will take place behind closed doors at the Archaos Circus Compagnie Theater in Marseille, southern France, on Thursday, February 4th, 2021. The fourth edition of the global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts have a way of thriving between the cracks and celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The Brazilian performer Alice Rende prepares for the performance of “Passages”, a contortionism creation in a space delimited by a Plexiglas box during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday, February 4, 2021. The Die fourth edition of the global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive among the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The Brazilian performer Alice Rende stretches before the performance of “Passages”, a contortionism creation in a room delimited by a Plexiglas box during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday, February 4, 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The acrobats Gioia Zanaboni from Italy (above) and Anja Eberhart from Switzerland from the Zania company practice outside in a public park because their training room is closed before they present their acrobatic show “Never Retiring” during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale. in Marseille, southern France, Thursday February 4, 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Performers present “Periple 2021”, a six-month non-stop circus performance organized by the six jugglers that make up the Protocole collective, during an event only for professionals, during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, on Friday in Marseille, southern France , insists, February 5, 2021. It’s been a tough year for the performing arts in most countries. Virus locks have canceled shows and shuttering locations. But the world’s best circus festival has found a way to thrive among the cracks of the rules – even without the large crowds that would normally have been there.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Yoann Bourgeois, French choreographer and co-director of the National Choreographic Center of Grenoble, takes part in interviews during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, on Wednesday February 3, 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The cultural concert hall at Docks Des Suds, which was closed for a year with a badge that reads “Emergency Exit” during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, South of France, Thursday February 4, 2021 A tough year for the performing Arts in most countries where virus bans cancel shows and shuttering locations. But the world’s best circus festival, the Circus Biennale, has found a way to thrive between the cracks of the rules – even without the large crowds that would normally have been there.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Brazilian performer Alice Rende warms up before performing “Passages”, a contortionism creation in a space delimited by a Plexiglas box during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday February 4, 2021. The fourth Edition of the global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive among the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The dancer Lucille Chalopin from Paris from the Eolienne company stretches before the performance of “Le Lac des Cygnes” by Florence Caillon, based on Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake, during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday, February. 4, 2021. The fourth edition of the Global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive among the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The actors Pauline Barboux and Jeanne Ragu from the company Libertivore present their show “Ether” directed by Fanny Soriano during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, on Wednesday, February 3, 2021.

BY THOMAS ADAMSON and DANIEL COLE

MARSEILLE, France (AP) – It’s been a tough year for the performing arts in most countries. Virus locks have canceled shows and shuttering locations.

But the world’s best circus festival has found a way to thrive between the cracks of the rules – even without the large crowds that would normally have been around.

The fourth edition of the Circus Biennale (BIAC), which takes place every two years in the south of France and ends on Saturday in the Mediterranean port city of Marseille, celebrates the anti-injury and spine-stretching arts that fuel the famous spectacle.

More than 110,000 people attended the last BIAC in 2019. This year it had up to 2,000 visitors, all professionals who work in the circus or want to buy shows.

This, too, is proof of the determination and determination of the organizers who have skilfully adapted their festival to the rules and regulations of the French authorities.

“We started with a plan A, then with plan B, then with plan C, then with plan D, and finally we decided on plan E, which was a biennial for professionals. That was possible, we were allowed to do it, ”said BIAC organizer Raquel Rache de Andrade.

The dozen of performances included upside down tutus, acrobatic bikes, brightly colored parachutes, and enough contortionism to shock a chiropractor.

How the Leisure Trade Adapts to the Pandemic

In In Focus: SoCal this week, host Tanya McRae examines how the Los Angeles entertainment industry continues to be affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Earlier this week, the director of the LA County Department of Public Health, Dr. Barbara Ferrer, Film and TV Productions, to stop production by the end of the month due to increasing numbers. Most productions have been suspended since the holidays, and movie-permit applications have continued to decline in LA since November.

LA City Councilor Joe Buscaino explains how FilmLA supports the industry and how most productions are working with the county’s COVID-19 guidelines to ensure protocols are followed.

David White, SAG-AFTRA’s national executive director, joins the conversation and shares how the union both supports its members who are currently unable to work and broadcasts journalists covering the pandemic.

McRae also meets the co-founder of PURE Sets, which was founded at the beginning of the pandemic and is helping to ensure that production sets become COVID-19 compliant. They offer four services including large scale decontamination, medically trained personnel to monitor the film crew, FDA approved PPE and testing.

As the theater industry turns and adapts to the pandemic, Spectrum News 1’s Tara Lynn Wagner examines what the industry is doing to survive and move forward.

Send us your thoughts at InFocusSocal@charter.com and watch on Sundays at 9 a.m. and noon.