August 1st Information Maker | Cash

Tompkins VIST Bank

Vicki Ide has been promoted to Vice President and Mortgage Loan Manager. In her new role, she will guide the bank’s mortgage staff in meeting client needs and building relationships. She was also nominated for a bank leadership group. Ide of Shoemakers Building joined Tompkins VIST Bank in 1995. She moved to the mortgage group in 2002 and became a mortgage management manager. In 2013 she was appointed sales representative. She takes over a management position from the retired Pamela Schenck.

Ide works in the community and is a member of the United Way Volunteers and Committees in Berks County. She also supports the Muscular Dystrophy Association and the Blanket of Hope, an organization that supports local animal shelters and other nonprofit organizations.

DMH business solution

Desiree M. Heckman has been hired as a Senior Accountant. She assists clients in Berks and Lehigh Counties with accounting, financial analysis and tracking, software implementation, software administration, and state and local tax compliance.

Heckman previously worked as a tax advisor at Loch Elsenbaumer Newton & Co and as a tax advisor at RKLLLP. Through her previous employment, she has worked with clients in a variety of industries including real estate, medical and construction, and has extensive knowledge of QuickBooks, accounting, monthly / year-end procedures, tax preparation and financial reporting. Heckman began his career as an office coordinator and accountant at DMH.

Heckman earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Millersville University and studied accounting. She is currently working at Villanova University’s Wiger School of Law for a Masters Degree in Taxation.

We are insured

Gallen Insurance employs Berks County’s Jennifer Burton to develop and support a growing benefits sector. She participates in Gallen Insurance and brings a wealth of passion and knowledge to the industry.

Burton understands the needs of private health insurance such as Medicare and private health insurance. She also specializes in finding plans to meet the group’s health insurance needs.

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August 1st News Maker | money

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Northam Outlines 1st Proposal for A part of Federal Help Cash – NBC4 Washington

Virginia Governor Ralph Northam is calling for $ 353 million from the latest federal coronavirus relief act to fuel economic recovery efforts for small businesses and industries hit during the pandemic.

Northam announced the planned investments at a press conference on Monday, marking the first concrete proposal for Virginia’s $ 4.3 billion stake in the funding of the US rescue plan that it has published.

Northam and other Democrats who control the General Assembly had previously issued a joint statement outlining their common priorities for money with no specifics. Legislators will have a special session in Richmond next month to allocate funding.

Northam calls for $ 250 million for the Rebuild VA Economic Recovery Fund, which provides grants for small businesses and nonprofits. The demand for the program is great.

The governor also proposed $ 50 million for Virginia Tourism Corp. initiatives. and allocate $ 53 million to other small business programs, including a fund to boost industrial projects.

“With the American rescue plan, we have a unique opportunity to recover from the effects of the pandemic, revitalize our communities and invest in our common prosperity,” Northam said in a statement.

Other announced priorities for the Democrats are public health, rebuilding the state unemployment fund and accelerating broadband access.

Every Republican in Congress has voted against the comprehensive pandemic relief bill that President Joe Biden signed in March.

NY Philharmonic provides 1st live performance with viewers in 13 months | Ap-entertainment

NEW YORK (AP) – Esa-Pekka Salonen took the stage to join the New York Philharmonic, which hadn’t gathered in front of an audience in exactly 400 days.

“On behalf of all of us on stage, welcome back,” the conductor told the crowd on Wednesday night. “We dreamed of this moment for a long time.”

The Philharmonic gave its first public performance after a historic hiatus of more than 13 months caused by the coronavirus pandemic. She played at the Shed on Brookfield Place, about two miles from the under-refurbished Geffen Hall in the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

“I’m currently at a euphoric climax because I missed it more than I realized,” said concertmaster Frank Huang afterwards.

There was a reduced strength of 23 strings – all masked – and no brass or woodwinds for a program that lasted an hour: Caroline Shaw’s “Entr’acte”, Jean Silbelius ‘”Rakastava (The Lover)” and Richard Strauss’ ” Metamorphoses “. ”

The cavernous shed, which opened in April 2019, had a masked audience of 150 people spread out in groups of one and two folding chairs with about 10 feet of space between each set in a venue typically seating about 1,200.

There were electronic tickets with timed entry, and temperatures were measured upon entry. Each person had to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test or proof that the vaccination had been completed at least 14 days before.

Many musicians taught during the gap. They had the benefit of continued but reduced salaries, unlike their Lincoln Center neighbor, the Metropolitan Opera, which long stopped paying their unionized employees.

The last time the Philharmonic gathered in front of an audience was on March 10th last year for a night of Claude Debussy compositions with mezzo-soprano Isabel Leonard and conductor Louis Langree.

Since then, at most a handful of the Philharmonic Orchestra had played together in public, with “bandwagon” performances moving around the New York City area and as a quartet in Florida, where COVID-19 regulations were less stringent. There were also digital release programs on NYPhil + recorded at St. Bart’s Church and Alice Tully Hall in Lincoln Center with music director Jaap van Zweden.

The Philharmonic hope to resume their regular subscription concerts in September, which will be relocated to Tully and the Rose Theater at Lincoln Center Jazz until the Geffen reopens in September 2022. Her musicians will open the summer series of picnic performances in New York’s Bryant Park with four nights beginning June 9th and hope to play in Vail, Colorado as well. The limited return is ahead of the Broadway shows, which have been talking about a possible resumption in September, and the Met, which opens on September 27, if new working arrangements can be made.

Salonen, the 62-year-old music director of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and chief conductor of the London Philharmonia Orchestra, appeared as a guest conductor and will repeat the program on Thursday evening.

“If there’s one thing we musicians have loved in these 14 months or so, it’s that nothing – absolutely nothing – can replace the plot and ritual of a live concert,” he told the audience. “Music, of course, exists on many different levels: in written form using the complex system of symbols we call notation; as recordings on various media; or perhaps most importantly in our memories and dreams. However, music can really fulfill its original. I dare to say the biological function as a powerful tool to convey deepest emotions and feelings only when it is performed here and now at this point in time of the union, when musicians and audience become one in a perfect symbiosis. “

Acoustics are difficult for an orchestra in The Shed because the high ceiling creates the need for reinforcement. The players grinned as they saw the crowd, and some in the audience responded with standing ovations.

“The three works we picked tonight all share a sense of moan, nostalgia and loss that is elevated to something deeply and essentially human by sheer beauty,” said Salonen. “Of course, after these months, not a single program can begin to sum up our feelings and emotions. Instead, we should see today’s concert as a new beginning, a signal for happier times, filled with music and other things that give meaning to our existence in this troubled world. “

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed in any way without permission.

LETTER: 1st District Republicans should return stimulus cash | Letters

My Republicans / Trumpists, you must return your $ 1,400 worth of stimulus checks. You asked Rep. Rob Wittman to vote no to the American relief plan. He doesn’t want you to receive any stimulus money as per your mandate.

While most Americans overwhelmingly supported the ARP, our congressional district did not. Wittman listened to your calls, survey responses, etc. and voted no as your representative.

So all true patriots have to give back the stimulus money they didn’t want. Please mail your check (payable to the Treasury Department) to Rep. Rob Wittman, No ARP Incentive For Me, 2055 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington DC, 20515.

Mr. Wittman will collect the returned money and do the right thing with it. Hopefully he’ll tell us the final amount.

Let’s go, true patriots!

Bangladesh TV hires nation’s 1st transgender information anchor | Leisure




Bangladesh’s first transgender newscaster Tashnuva Anan Shishir reads a news magazine in Dhaka, Bangladesh on Tuesday March 9, 2021. A Bangladeshi satellite television broadcaster has signed the South Asian county’s first transgender newscaster to remove the ingrained social stigma they face. Shishir, who had previously worked as a legal activist and actress, performed in front of an audience on the Monday following her appointment as the day coincided with International Women’s Day. She made her debut reading a three-minute daily news bulletin on Boishakhi TV in Dhaka.




Bangladesh’s first transgender newscaster Tashnuva Anan Shishir, center, reads a news magazine in Dhaka, Bangladesh on Tuesday, March 9, 2021. A Bangladeshi satellite television broadcaster has signed the South Asian county’s first transgender newscaster to tackle the deep-seated problems-ingrained social stigma they face. Shishir, who had previously worked as a legal activist and actress, performed in front of an audience on the Monday following her appointment as the day coincided with International Women’s Day. She made her debut reading a three-minute daily news bulletin on Boishakhi TV in Dhaka.




Bangladesh’s first transgender newscaster Tashnuva Anan Shishir (left) prepares to read the news magazine in Dhaka, Bangladesh on Tuesday March 9, 2021. A Bangladeshi satellite television station has signed up the South Asian county’s first transgender newscaster in hopes of removing the ingrained social stigma they face. Shishir, who had previously worked as a legal activist and actress, performed in front of an audience on the Monday following her appointment as the day coincided with International Women’s Day. She made her debut reading a three-minute daily news bulletin on Boishakhi TV in Dhaka.

From JULHAS ALAM Associated Press

DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) – A Bangladeshi satellite television broadcaster has hired the country’s first transgender newscaster and hopes the appointment will help transform society.

Tashnuva Anan Shishir, who previously worked as a legal activist and actress, made her debut on Boishakhi TV in Dhaka on Monday, International Women’s Day. She read a three-minute newscast and cried after she finished as her coworkers applauded and cheered.

“I was very nervous, I felt so emotional, but I had in mind that I had to overcome this ordeal, this final test,” Shishir, 29, said in an interview on Tuesday.

Born Kamal Hossain Shishir said she discovered in her early teens that she was inside a man’s body and behaving like a woman. She said family members, relatives and neighbors started teasing her and she was bullied and sexually exploited.

She got the feeling that it was impossible to go on living and tried suicide, she said.

The worst thing that happened was her father stopped talking to her and said she was the reason her family lost face, Shishir said.

“I left home,” she said.

She moved from her family home in a southern coastal district to live a solitary life in the capital, where she received hormone therapy, worked for charitable causes, and worked with a local theater company. In January she began studying public health at a university in Dhaka, which she continues alongside her work at the television station.

Pandemic causes Carnegie Corridor to overlook season for 1st time | Leisure

NEW YORK (AP) – Carnegie Hall will miss an entire season for the first time in its 130-year history.

Carnegie announced Thursday that performances at its three venues from April 6 to July have been canceled, extending a closure that began March 13 due to the novel coronavirus pandemic.

Carnegie hopes to reopen in October for the 2021-22 season and intends to postpone announcing the season in late spring.

The pandemic also caused the Metropolitan Opera to miss a season for the first time, and it hopes to start its season in September. Broadway theaters have been closed since March and the arts shutdowns have contributed to a significant decline in New York’s economy.

Carnegie’s Voices of Hope festival will move online from April 16-30, focusing on works by artists in times of crisis and oppression. Carnegie plans to announce the festival program in late March.

Carnegie has plans for its annual summer youth ensemble residencies at SUNY Purchase this summer.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed in any way without permission.