No want for Chilcot-style inquiry into Afghanistan marketing campaign, says Armed Forces chief

The UK does not need to conduct a full Chilcot-style public inquiry his Afghanistan mission because the campaign was a just war, said the chief of the Bundeswehr.

General Sir Nick Carter said the two-decade intervention did not face the same controversy as the Iraq war and did not require the same type of lengthy and costly public investigation.

The chief of defense also said that while the Taliban won the propaganda war after the US and NATO withdrew, the insurgents did overwhelmed by their recent gains. He predicted that if the Afghan government remained united, it could hold the country’s major cities against the militants.

Sir Nick’s comments came after calls for a public inquiry into the campaign, which cost billions of pounds and killed 457 British soldiers, sailors and airmen.

Sir John Chilcots seven year investigation heard from 150 witnesses and looked at thousands of documents to investigate Tony Blair’s decision to wage war in Iraq, whether troops were prepared and how the aftermath was dealt with.

His twelve-volume report tore into the planning, preparation and budgeting of the military campaign, which killed 179 soldiers, and stated that it ended “very far from success”.

Earlier this month, Lord Dannatt, a former chief of staff, said that British troops are now troops Left Afghanistan “The real test must begin and a public inquiry along the lines of Chilcot’s Iraq must be launched.”

Tobias Ellwood, chairman of the Commons Defense Committee, also called for a “Chilcot-style investigation so that we can learn the lessons of what went wrong”.

But Sir Nick told The Telegraph, “You have to remember why we had a Chilcot investigation. As far as I remember, it was because some big questions were raised about the justice of the war in Iraq. I don’t think so. that anyone is questioning the true justice of the war in Afghanistan. “

He said the military campaign was backed by a UN Security Council resolution and that NATO members invoked the alliance’s mutual defense pact after the 9/11 attacks.

“It was very clear why the international community went to Afghanistan to do what it did and no one questioned that,” he said. “I think we need to put the reason we could conduct a public inquiry into perspective, and I don’t think anyone would criticize the decision to engage people in Afghanistan.”

Sir Nick added that while there are “many good lessons that can be learned from the way the campaign is carried out … I am not sure if this is necessarily to be done as a public and likely very costly investigation. Rather, I think it should be “a reasonable, transparent exercise within the government”.

The Taliban have swept the Afghan government out of dozen of rural districts in the two months since Joe Biden announced the final of his troop withdrawal. Sir Nick, who had served in the country for nearly three years in total, said the militants had overwhelmed themselves and the Afghan armed forces had consolidated.

He added: “If Kabul stand united and they manage to supply and support the Afghan army so that it can keep the main provincial capitals, then I don’t think the rally that is Taliban uprising will be likely can develop its effect. “