NEW: Gov. Kemp to signal invoice permitting Georgia school athletes to generate profits off their picture – WSB-TV Channel 2

ATLANTA – Thursday is a big day for college athletes in Georgia.

Governor Kemp signs a bill to make money off of their image. It’s called Name, Image, Likeness Bill or HB 617.

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It protects student athletes from punishment for making profits on their own.

Here is the summary of the bill:

“A bill entitled to receive an Act to amend Chapter 20 of Title 20 of the Official Annotated Code of Georgia Regarding Post-Secondary Education to provide for undergraduate athletes participating in intercollegiate sports programs at post-secondary educational institutions to receive compensation for the use of the name, image, or likeness of the student athlete; To apply for intercollegial sports associations; to enable professional representation of such student athletes participating in intercollegiate athletics; provide knowledge; Provide definitions; to take care of related matters; provide for an effective date; repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes. “

The signing ceremony will take place at 8:30 a.m. on the UGA campus. The law comes into force on January 1st.

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The bipartisan bill was sponsored by: Rep. Charles Martin [R], Rep. Trey Rhodes [R], Rep. Barry Fleming [R], Rep. Calvin Smyre [D], Rep. Philip Singleton [R] and Senator Bill Cowsert [R].

READ THE FULL INVOICE HERE.

Other states have passed similar laws that allow college athletes to make money for using their name, image, or likeness.

The NCAA’s attempts to reform its bylaws and allow college athletes to capitalize on their names, images, and likenesses have stalled. Federal legislation on the matter is pending in Congress. But states disappointed in inaction have begun to pass their own laws. Florida and Mississippi laws that allow student athletes to make money off their name, image, or likeness will go into effect July 1, although Florida’s deployment may be delayed for another year.

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Associated Press information was used in this report.