Everyone wants to feel the happiness of the Irish and there is no better place to experience it than Dublin. The capital of Ireland has a rich history as a 9th century Viking settlement and home to St. Patrick’s Cathedral. It also has one of the largest St. Patrick’s Day celebrations in the world with a massive six day festival filled with music, dance and a deep appreciation for Irish culture. While this year’s festival is taking place virtually, there is still a lot to experience in this happy country.

Where to sleep

The first thing you want to decide before heading to Dublin is where you will be staying. The historic Merchant Hotel was restored in 2005 to retain the 18th century suites named after Irish writers WB Yeats, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce and Bram Stoker. The Dean has 52 rooms in six different styles, from modern to cozy. The rooftop bar has some of the best views in town. The Spencer Hotel has a relaxing spa, sauna and steam room to help you relax. The Clayton Hotel offers the convenience and convenience of being in the city center. But if luxury is what you’re looking for, The Merrion is for you. Combining some of the most impressive Georgian architecture with Ireland’s largest private collection of 19th and 20th century art, this five star hotel makes this beauty one of the city’s finest wonders.

What should I do

Once you are settled in, there is no shortage of fun things to do. Start with a visit to Trinity College and check out the extensive library with 200,000 books or stroll through the National Botanic Gardens and experience the exotic and colorful flowers. The Dublin Zoo is one of the most popular attractions in Phoenix Park with more than 400 animals. If the Lions look a little familiar, it’s because their ancestor Leo was used in MGM’s movie logos in the early 1960s. Learn how to play skilled Irish sports like hurling and handball at Experience Gaelic Games, and Wild Rover Tours takes you to all of the locations where HBO’s Game of Thrones was filmed. And no trip to Dublin is complete without a stiff taste of real Irish liquor, which you can sample at the Guinness Storehouse Factory, Jameson Distillery and the Irish Whiskey Museum.

Where shall we eat

When it comes to pub food, Dublin is king and the options are endless in the city center dining scene. You can have hearty full Irish breakfasts at a variety of places including The Bakehouse, O’Neill’s and The Hairy Lemon and you won’t be judged for having a big pint of Guinness early in the morning. Leo Burdock has served his famous fish ‘n’ chips since 1913 and even has a famous wall dedicated to celebrities who dined there. Delahunt has its own twist on boxty potato pancakes, and fast-paced eateries like Bunsen and Bobo’s offer flavourful organic Irish beef burgers. But one of the most popular dishes is the beef stew, and few places are as satisfying as the Church Cafe on Mary Street. The slow-cooked lamb with root vegetables and baby potatoes will make you fall in love with a bite.

Where to explore

There are several photogenic sights to discover in Dublin that are not to be missed before you leave. Built in 1816, Ha’Penny Bridge is one of Dublin’s oldest historic sites and glows in a colorful display at night. The National Leprechaun Museum is entirely dedicated to Irish folklore and mythology, while the Little Museum of Dublin houses 5,000 exhibits on three floors for 20th century events. The historic Dublin Castle offers an even deeper look back at the 13th century, and the tower has an impressive exhibition at 120 meters high. Escape the hustle and bustle by taking a breather by the pond in St. Stephen’s Green Park. Nothing says Ireland like green spaces.