Hungarian touring circus stays match for post-COVID opening | Leisure




Kevin Richter and his sister Angelina practice as Kevin Richter’s jumping group rehearses on April 20, 2021 in the Capital Circus in Budapest, Hungary. A state of emergency was declared in Hungary just one day before the troop’s spring season began last year. and pandemic restrictions that curb events and public gatherings have resulted in the circus not generating any income since then.




A small dog looks out of a car at the home base of the Florian Richter Circus in Szada, Hungary, April 20, 2021. Human and four-legged performers are preparing to bring Hungary’s largest traveling circus back onto the streets after the COVID-. 19 pandemic stopped their shows for more than a year.




The Hungarian traveling circus remains fit for the opening after COVID

Kevin Richter and his girlfriend Brigitta Sibrak sit in the door of their caravan after the rehearsals of Kevin Richter’s jumping group at the Capital Circus in Budapest, Hungary, on April 20, 2021. A state of emergency was declared in Hungary just a day before the troupe began last year’s spring season and pandemic restrictions restricting events and public gatherings have resulted in the circus running out of revenue since then.




The Hungarian traveling circus remains fit for the opening after COVID

Kevin Richter’s jumping group will rehearse on April 20, 2021 in the capital circus in Budapest, Hungary. A state of emergency was declared in Hungary just a day before the troupe’s spring season began last year, and pandemic restrictions are restricting events and public gatherings.I have suggested the circus has stopped generating income since then.




The Hungarian traveling circus remains fit for the opening after COVID

Florian Richter trains a horse at the home base of his circus in Szada, Hungary on April 20, 2021. Human and four-legged artists are preparing to bring Hungary’s largest traveling circus back on the streets after the COVID-19 pandemic suspended their shows for more than a year.




The Hungarian traveling circus remains fit for the opening after COVID

Florian Richter checks the feet of Sandra, a 43-year-old Indian elephant, on April 20, 2021 at the home base of his circus in Szada, Hungary. Human and four-legged performers are preparing to bring Hungary’s largest traveling circus back to the circus street after the COVID-19 pandemic halted their shows for more than a year.




The Hungarian traveling circus remains fit for the opening after COVID

A horse stands in an enclosure at the home base of the Florian Richter Circus in Szada, Hungary, April 20, 2021. Human and four-legged artists are preparing to bring Hungary’s largest traveling circus back onto the streets after the COVID-19 pandemic stopped its Shows for over a year.




The Hungarian traveling circus remains fit for the opening after COVID

An employee walks a horse at the home base of the Florian Richter Circus in Szada, Hungary, on April 20, 2021. People and four-legged artists prepare to get Hungary’s largest traveling circus back on the streets after the end of the COVID-19 pandemic have been doing his shows for more than a year.




The Hungarian traveling circus remains fit for the opening after COVID

Florian Richter checks the feet of Sandra, a 43-year-old Indian elephant, on April 20, 2021 at the home base of his circus in Szada, Hungary. Human and four-legged performers are preparing to bring Hungary’s largest traveling circus back to the circus street after the COVID-19 pandemic halted their shows for more than a year.




The Hungarian traveling circus remains fit for the opening after COVID

An employee jumps from hay bales before feeding horses on April 20, 2021 at the home base of the Florian Richter Circus in Szada, Hungary. Humans and four-legged friends are preparing to bring Hungary’s largest traveling circus back onto the streets after the COVID-19 pandemic stopped their shows for more than a year.




The Hungarian traveling circus remains fit for the opening after COVID

Kevin Richter’s jumping group will rehearse on April 20, 2021 in the capital circus in Budapest, Hungary. A state of emergency was declared in Hungary just a day before the troupe’s spring season began last year, and pandemic restrictions are restricting events and public gatherings.I have suggested the circus has stopped generating income since then.




The Hungarian traveling circus remains fit for the opening after COVID

Kevin Richter’s jumping group will rehearse on April 20, 2021 in the capital circus in Budapest, Hungary. A state of emergency was declared in Hungary just a day before the troupe’s spring season began last year, and pandemic restrictions are restricting events and public gatherings.I have suggested the circus has stopped generating income since then.




The Hungarian traveling circus remains fit for the opening after COVID

Horses wait in front of a training session at the home base of the Florian Richter Circus in Szada, Hungary, on April 20, 2021. From its off-season home in Szada, a small village outside the capital of Budapest, the Florian Richter Circus holds rehearsals in cautious anticipation, when the performances could start again.

From JUSTIN SPIKE Associated Press

BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) – Human and four-legged artists are preparing to bring Hungary’s largest traveling circus back on the streets after the COVID-19 pandemic suspended their shows for more than a year.

The Florian Richter Circus is holding rehearsals from its off-season home in Sada, a small village outside the capital Budapest, in cautious anticipation of when the performances could start again.

The state of emergency was declared in Hungary just one day before the start of the troop’s spring season last year. The circus has not generated any income since then due to pandemic restrictions restricting events and public gatherings.

“It’s been almost a year and a half now, without anything. Of course I have to think as a businessman, as an artist and as a father at the same time, ”said Florian Richter, the owner of the circus. “I’m the engine of this circus, so I can’t give up, I can’t get emotional.”

In addition to human actors, almost 50 different animals, including the Indian elephant Sandra, eight camels, five zebras, three ponies and 32 horses, make up the members of the troop. Feeding the animals and paying their dog handlers has used up almost all of the circus’ financial reserves, and Richter said he still doesn’t know when the pandemic rules would allow performances to resume.

“It’s all money, money, money. A lot of money has to be spent because it costs a lot to maintain a ranch this size, “he said.