In interviews, several real estate personalities said that Mr. Adams’s campaign contributions were not only transactional but reflected his general support.

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Regardless of the exact dynamic, by the time his campaign was submitted in March, Mr. Adams had amassed at least $ 937,000 from developers, property managers, architects, contractors, and more. This represented more than a third of his total private contributions, excluding public matching funds, research shows, and included money from developers of luxury buildings in gentrifying neighborhoods.

(To qualify for public matching funds under a new city program, Mr. Adams’ campaign voluntarily returned more than $ 300,000 of that money to the real estate industry – including sharing several donations referred to in this article – because they have exceeded the contribution limits of the program.)

Early supporters of Mr. Adams’ mayoral offer included Mr. Schwartz, the co-founder of the Slate group.

On May 25, 2018, a subsidiary of Slate filed a land use application in the city to erect a 40-story tower on a wedge-shaped lot in downtown Brooklyn that spans approximately 24 stories. Mr. Adams would have to provide an opinion on the proposed zone change.

Three weeks after filing, on the evening of June 13th, Mr. Schwartz hosted the fundraiser for Mr. Adams in his office on East 29th Street. According to the participants, Mr. Schwartz organized the event and personally invited guests.

Mr. Schwartz, who was on the city’s business list, distanced himself and Slate from the event. He didn’t personally contribute; He last donated $ 320 to Mr. Adams’ campaign in 2015. And he sent the invitation on behalf of a management company that operates in the same offices as Slate. The invitation – in blue, yellow, and white with the “Eric Adams 2021” logo – suggested contributions ranging from $ 300 for a “friend” to $ 1,000 for a “sponsor”.

Several of Mr. Schwartz’s vendors donated: a demolition company gave $ 2,000, a real estate attorney gave $ 2,500, and an equipment maker gave $ 5,000.