In the world-famous Keukenhof garden in Lisse, Netherlands, Friday, April 9, 2021, there are far fewer visitors than usual. After a month after the dreary month of lockdown, there are glimmers of hope in spring for a relaxation of coronavirus restrictions in a Dutch flower garden and other public venues. Keukenhof, nestled in the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague, opened its doors on Friday to a happy 5,000 people who were only admitted if they could prove on a smartphone app that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.




In the world-famous Keukenhof garden in Lisse, Netherlands, Friday, April 9, 2021, there are far fewer visitors than usual. After a month after the dreary month of lockdown, there are glimmers of hope in spring for a relaxation of coronavirus restrictions in a Dutch flower garden and other public venues. Keukenhof, nestled in the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague, opened its doors on Friday to a happy 5,000 people who were only admitted if they could prove on a smartphone app that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.




Visitors tiptoe through the tulips in the Dutch virus test

In the world-famous Keukenhof garden in Lisse, Netherlands, Friday, April 9, 2021, there are far fewer visitors than usual. After a month after the dreary month of lockdown, there are glimmers of hope in spring for a relaxation of coronavirus restrictions in a Dutch flower garden and other public venues. Keukenhof, nestled in the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague, opened its doors on Friday to a happy 5,000 people who were only admitted if they could prove on a smartphone app that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.




Visitors tiptoe through the tulips in the Dutch virus test

In the world-famous Keukenhof garden in Lisse, Netherlands, Friday, April 9, 2021, there are far fewer visitors than usual. After a month after the dreary month of lockdown, there are glimmers of hope in spring for a relaxation of coronavirus restrictions in a Dutch flower garden and other public venues. Keukenhof, nestled in the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague, opened its doors on Friday to a happy 5,000 people who were only admitted if they could prove on a smartphone app that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.




Visitors tiptoe through the tulips in the Dutch virus test

In the world-famous Keukenhof garden in Lisse, Netherlands, Friday, April 9, 2021, there are far fewer visitors than usual. After a month after the dreary month of lockdown, there are glimmers of hope in spring for a relaxation of coronavirus restrictions in a Dutch flower garden and other public venues. Keukenhof, nestled in the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague, opened its doors on Friday to a happy 5,000 people who were only admitted if they could prove on a smartphone app that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.




Visitors tiptoe through the tulips in the Dutch virus test

In the world-famous Keukenhof garden in Lisse, Netherlands, Friday, April 9, 2021, there are far fewer visitors than usual. After a month after the dreary month of lockdown, there are glimmers of hope in spring for a relaxation of coronavirus restrictions in a Dutch flower garden and other public venues. Keukenhof, nestled in the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague, opened its doors on Friday to a happy 5,000 people who were only admitted if they could prove on a smartphone app that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.




Visitors tiptoe through the tulips in the Dutch virus test

Two women take photos because there are far fewer visitors than usual in the world-famous Keukenhof garden in Lisse, the Netherlands, on Friday, April 9, 2021. Finally, after a month after the dreary month of lockdown, shots of hope emerge in the spring of easing coronavirus restrictions in a Dutch flower garden and other public facilities. Keukenhof, nestled in the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague, opened its doors on Friday to a happy 5,000 people who were only admitted if they could prove on a smartphone app that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.




Visitors tiptoe through the tulips in the Dutch virus test

A couple with face masks took their photos in the world-famous Keukenhof garden in Lisse, the Netherlands, on Friday, April 9th, 2021. After a month after the dreary month of lockdown, there are glimmers of hope in spring for a relaxation of coronavirus restrictions in a Dutch flower garden and other public venues. Keukenhof, nestled in the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague, opened its doors on Friday to a happy 5,000 people who were only admitted if they could prove on a smartphone app that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.

From MIKE CORDER Associated Press

LISSE, Netherlands (AP) – After the bleak winter months of a coronavirus lockdown, spring hopes erupted on Friday as restrictions were eased at a Dutch flower garden and other public facilities.

As part of a government-approved pilot project, the world-famous Keukenhof Gardens opened its gates to let a few thousand people tiptoe through the 7 million tulips, hyacinths, daffodils and myriad other flowers carefully tipped by a small army of people manicured lawns were planted by gardeners.

A maximum of 5,000 visitors were allowed to enter the garden in the middle of the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague if they could prove that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.

Minke Kleinen, who visited downtown Arnhem with her friend Ilse van Egten, said it felt like her “first legal day”. The friends took quick tests before leaving and received their negative results by email as they drove.

“It feels strange that we can stand next to each other,” said Van Egten and hugged the little ones briefly. “It is nice!”

Keukenhof lost an entire season to the pandemic last year when the first deadly wave of infections swept across the Netherlands. The planned opening on March 20 this year never took place due to the country’s strict virus lockdown.