FILE – Kelly Rowland attends the premiere of “What Men Want” in Los Angeles in this file photo dated Jan. 28, 2019. Rowland released an EP called “K” with six tracks that are heavily influenced by Afrobeat rhythms.




FILE – This file photo dated February 21, 2019 shows Kelly Rowland at the 12th ESSENCE Black Women in Hollywood Awards in Beverly Hills, California. Rowland released an EP called “K” with six tracks that are heavily influenced by Afrobeat rhythms.




For Kelly Rowland there are good things in threesome

FILE – Kelly Rowland arrives for the 2019 Baby2Baby Gala on November 9, 2019 in Culver City, California. Rowland released an EP called “K” with six tracks that are heavily influenced by Afrobeat rhythms.

By GARY GERARD HAMILTON Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) – When good things come threesome, Kelly Rowland basks in her current moment of bliss.

Less than a month ago, the Grammy winner gave birth to her second child, Noah. she celebrated her 40th birthday last week; and on Friday she releases a new EP called “K.” fall.

“A few months ago I said I was going to have two births: the birth of the baby and the birth of an album,” Rowland said after warning that her 6-year-old son Titan or her newborn’s screams could interrupt that Interview. “Some songs I’ve had for years, some of the songs I’ve had for maybe a year or a few months, but it all fits together so well.”

The result of their musical love work is a six-track project that is heavily influenced by Afrobeat rhythms. How was the admission with a growing womb?

“(I was) out of breath!” Rowland laughed.

In “K” there is the dancing dance track “Crazy” as well as the sultry “Hitman”, a song that should be a staple for the kind of sweaty basement parties the pandemic can’t allow.

On the island taste of “Better”, Rowland sings emotionally: “You love me better / Because I’m not going nowhere.”

“I’m definitely telling you about myself and Tim’s business,” she said with a laugh, adding that she fell more in love with husband Tim Weatherspoon during the forced proximity of the pandemic. “When I hear a song, I don’t hear it for ‘Will this be a hit? ‘I hear it the way I feel about it … and with the records everyone will hear on the (EP) there is a connection to everyone. “