Assessment: Kevin Hart reveals vary in tearjerker ‘Fatherhood’ | Leisure




This picture, published by Netflix, shows Kevin Hart in a scene from “Fatherhood”.




This picture, published by Netflix, shows Melody Hurd (left) and Kevin Hart in a scene from “Fatherhood”.




Review: Kevin Hart shows reach in bags under the eyes 'fatherhood'

This picture, published by Netflix, shows Kevin Hart (left) and Alfre Woodard in a scene from “Fatherhood”.




Review: Kevin Hart shows reach in bags under the eyes 'fatherhood'

This picture, published by Netflix, shows Alfre Woodard from left, Thedra Porter and Frankie Faison in a scene from “Fatherhood”.

Film writer by LINDSEY BAHR AP

Kevin Hart can make us laugh and cry, it seems, even if the vehicle is practically designed to start the waterworks. in the “Fatherhood,” On Netflix on Friday he plays a new father whose wife dies shortly after giving birth and he raises his daughter alone.

To be fair, there were a lot of built-in bags under the eyes that failed (remember “Life Itself”?). But something has to go very, very wrong for a movie to mess up that premise. But “Fatherhood” doesn’t just work on this emotional level – it’s also a cut above the rest, thanks to a clever and funny and basically authentic script (directors Paul Weitz and Dana Stevens) and Hart’s inspired cast.

The story is based on Matthew Logelin’s memoir “Two Kisses for Maddy: A Memoir of Loss and Love” about the loss of his wife after the birth of their daughter. It has had a few other lives since its release 10 years ago, first as a lifetime movie, then as a Channing Tatum vehicle, before eventually landing Weitz (“About a Boy”) as director and Hart as its star.

Hart plays Matt, a Boston professional with a beautiful woman. The film introduces him at her funeral before cutting back how it happened. The script does a good job of introducing you to Matt and Liz (Deborah Ayorinde) and turning them into more than just a boring substitute for “woman” while you prepare for what’s to come. And of course it’s not about her, but about Matt and his little daughter Maddy. He doesn’t even have time to grieve. He has to keep a little person alive.