Local motorcycle ministries and auto clubs come together for a car show on Saturday to raise funds for the Greenwood Pathway House.

The auto show Righteous Rods, Rollin for Jesus takes place on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Wilbanks Sports Complex, the former site of the Greenwood Civic Center. If the show is canceled due to rain, the show will be postponed to September 25th.

For information about the auto show, call 864-396-8477.

Jamie Starnes and his wife Christie organized the car show. The couple are part of a local motorcycle service and have helped support the Pathway House homeless shelter.

“We were in there and there are 40 or 50 people, not just from Greenwood,” Starnes said. “There are people from all over the world who get help there.”

Starnes said he was moved by the work Pathway House does to help homeless youth and single parents and wanted to help. He said this car show is a way to help people by just showing off their cars and trucks. People showing a car on Saturday paid an entry fee of $ 20, with each dollar going towards the Pathway House.

There will also be food trucks and trailers, live music, raffles and other vendors at the auto show, along with voting in four competition areas – antique vehicles, show cars, show trucks and motorcycles. Starnes said the show will also feature jeeps, and several auto clubs from the area have been invited to participate.

“That’s what it’s about, you only help when you can,” said Starnes. “Sometimes there is your money, sometimes there is only your time.”

Anthony Price, executive director of the Pathway House, said the shelter is building the first set of five cottages due for delivery in October that will provide shelter for single parents and their homeless children.

“The problem we have in Greenwood is that we only have one bed for 100 homeless children in Greenwood County alone,” Price said.

When all the planned cottages have been built, 60 additional beds for parents and children will be provided in addition to the men’s and women’s shelters in the Pathway House. These tiny country-style buildings have bunk beds, a sink, and a bathroom area. The nonprofit plans to build a central dining and kitchen area that will serve as an activity center for parents and children, Price said.

“It offers them a safe place to stay. The biggest challenge parents with children face is safety, ”he said. “This brings families out of an insecure situation with a lot of trauma and gives them a safe place to live.”

The auto show, Price said, will help Pathway House run costs as fall approaches, when the nonprofit opens its cold weather shelter.

“I can’t say enough about Anthony Price and all the people over there,” said Starnes. “You really have my heart.”

Anyone who would like to volunteer or donate to support the Pathway House can find at gwdpathway.org or by calling the shelter at 864-223-4460.

Contact author Damian Dominguez at 864-634-7548 or follow @IJDDOMINGUEZ on Twitter.