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Six Flags Entertainment Corp (NYSE:SIX)
Q4 2020 Earnings Call
Feb 24, 2021, 8:00 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the Six Flags Q4 and Full Year 2020 Earnings Conference Call. My name is Catherine and I’ll be your operator for today’s call. [Operator Instructions]

I will now turn the call over to Steve Purtell, Senior Vice President, Investor Relations.

Stephen R. Purtell — Senior Vice President, Investor Relations, Treasury and Strategy

Good morning and welcome to our fourth quarter and full-year 2020 call. With me are Mike Spanos, President and CEO of Six Flags and Sandeep Reddy, our Chief Financial Officer. We will begin the call with prepared comments and then open the call to your questions.

Our comments will include forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws. These statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in such statements and the company undertakes no obligation to update or revise these statements.

In addition, on the call, we will discuss non-GAAP financial measures. Investors can find, both a detailed discussion of business risks and reconciliations of non-GAAP financial measures to GAAP financial measures in the company’s annual reports, quarterly reports and other forms filed or furnished with the SEC.

At this time, I will turn the call over to Mike.

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning. Thank you for joining our call. This past year has been exceptionally challenging as the world contends with a pandemic that has upended all of our lives. We are grateful for the first responders who keep us safe and for those who provide the services we all count on every day. I am proud that Six Flags has been able to make a difference in the communities we serve by hosting vaccination sites and testing locations and by donating food banks for those in need. I also want to thank our Six Flags team for rising to meet the challenges of the past year. They have continued to amaze me with their dedication, perseverance and resilience as we found innovative ways to safely entertain nearly 7 million guests as a preferred entertainment choice.

We established the highest standards of cleanliness and safety protocol as validated by local health officials and our guest feedback. We strengthened our liquidity position, significantly reduced our operating and capital expenditures and continue to innovate to safely and successfully reopen our parks. I’ve never been more proud of our company or more confident in our future.

In the fourth quarter, we continued to make significant progress on our transformation plan, which focuses on strengthening our core business. This plan is in full action and will fuel our new strategy to drive long-term profitable growth. Our new strategy is evolutionary, not revolutionary. We are going to do many of the same things we did in the past. We are going to do them better. Specifically, we will modernize all aspects of the guest experience and we will operate more efficiently as an organization.

As I stressed on our last call, our guests still love our roller coasters and funnel cakes. They just want a more seamless experience and we can provide them that through technology. We have divided our call into three parts. First, I will provide an overview of our recent operating performance and the strong demand trends we are seeing. Second, Sandeep will go into more detail about our financial results and give an update on the progress of our transformation plan. Finally, I will return to discuss our new strategy in more detail and review our three strategic focus areas.

We are pleased that our attendance has consistently improved since we first reopened our parks last year in the second quarter. I’d like to highlight a few reasons why we’re so optimistic about the upcoming season despite the challenging operating environment. First, on a comparable period basis, attendance trends in open parks have increased from 20% to 25% of 2019 levels in the second quarter to 35% in the third quarter to 51% in the fourth quarter. We have continued to see strong signs so far this year with attendance in open parks trending at consistent levels as the fourth quarter despite extreme weather conditions in Texas over the past couple of weeks.

Our guest surveys indicate that there is extraordinary pent-up demand for outdoor entertainment options close to home. And we believe that this widespread desire will drive attendance in the coming quarters.

Second, we are encouraged by the resiliency of our Active Pass Base which was approximately flat between the third quarter and fourth quarter of 2020. Even more encouraging, the number of members who retained their memberships after their initial 12-month commitment period, our most valuable guests, is actually up versus this time last year. We see the strong retention of our members even in the midst of a pandemic as a testament to our unique offering and our loyal following. Once our parks are back up and running at full capacity, we expect that our Active Pass Base will quickly ramp back up to previous levels and beyond.

Third, the pandemic encourage us to think creatively about how to maximize use of our parks. Both the creative solutions we found and the underlying dynamism of our team will continue to drive growth well past COVID. Our drive-through safari operators have separately gated attraction through the Thanksgiving weekend. Demand was so high that we will operate the drive-through safari again starting in March 2021 creating the longest season in the Animal Parks history. In the fourth quarter, we also offered drive-through or walk-through holiday experiences with our rides at four of our theme parks giving our guests the opportunity to celebrate the season with lights, beloved characters and festivities. These events proved so popular that we extended them into January. Going forward, we expect to continue many of these events, which will allow us to extend our operating season and give guests even more reasons to visit our parks throughout the year.

So while the environment remains fluid, we are encouraged by recent trends and are optimistic about both the short and long-term prospects of our business.

I will now turn the call over to Sandeep, who will give us some more details about the quarter and our transformation efforts. Sandeep?

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Mike and good morning, everyone. Results for the fourth quarter and full-year are not comparable to prior year because of temporary park closures, modified operations and attendance limitations. Total attendance for the quarter was 2.2 million guests, 338,000 of which came from the four parks that offered modified Holiday in the Park lights without rides and our drive-through safari in New Jersey.

Revenue in the quarter was down $152 million or 58% to $109 million as a result of a 65% decline in attendance. Sponsorship, international and accommodations revenue in the fourth quarter declined by $8 million due to the deferral of most sponsorship revenue and the suspension of the majority of our accommodations operations. Guest spending per capita in the quarter increased 17% driven by a 16% increase in admissions spending per capita and a 19% increase in in-park spending per capita.

The increase in admissions spending per capita was driven primarily by recurring monthly membership revenue from members who retained their memberships after their initial 12-month commitment period, as well as an increase in the mix of single-day guests. The increase in in-park spending per capita was primarily driven by a higher mix of single-day guests who tend to spend more per visit.

In addition, revenue from recurring monthly all-season membership products such as the all-season dining pass contributed to the increase. Attendance from our Active Pass Base in the fourth quarter represented 55% of total attendance versus 71% for the fourth quarter of 2019 demonstrating our success in attracting visitation of single-day guests.

On the cost side, cash, operating and SG&A expenses decreased by $30 million or 18%, primarily due to the following: first, cost saving measures, primarily related to reduced salaries and wages and lower Fright Fest and Holiday in the Park related costs due to the restricted operating environment and our organization redesign completed in October; second, lower advertising costs; third, savings in utilities and other costs related to the fact that several of our parks were not operating or were operating with a reduced product offering.

These cost savings were offset by a charge of $19 million due to an increase in legal reserves. The total amount recorded reflects managements estimate of the probable outcome of a legacy class action lawsuit. Excluding the litigation charge, cash costs decreased by $49 million or 29%. While we have taken measures to reduce our variable costs, we retained 90% of our full-time members and maintained their benefits in order to position ourselves to reopen parks as safely and as soon as possible. We reduced salaries of all employees by 25% during 2020 in order to preserve cash and our Directors also deferred their compensation for the last three quarters of 2020. Several of them, including our retiring and new Chairman, opted to take that compensation in the form of stock. Due to the improving outlook, we have restored all our employees to full salaries, with the exception of our CEO who opted to be restored in March. Although these actions offset our cost reduction efforts somewhat, we believe they were the right decisions for both the short and long-term.

By keeping our parks in a state of readiness, we were able to maximize the number of days we could operate. We also were able to keep our guests engaged, our employees motivated and our parks prepared for 2021.

Adjusted EBITDA for the quarter was a loss of $39 million which included a $19 million increase in legal reserves compared to income of $72 million in the prior year period.

Moving to full year performance. Attendance of 6.8 million guests was down 79% from prior year. Total revenue of $357 million was down 76% driven by lower attendance due to park closures, limited operations. Total guest spending per capita increased more than $6 or 14% due to a higher percentage of single-day guests and the positive revenue impact from members who have remained past their initial 12-month commitment period. Attendance from our Active Pass Base for the full year represented 56% of total attendance versus 63% for full year 2019.

Cash, operating and SG&A expenses were down 35% for the year due to cost savings measures taken immediately after we suspended operations. This cost reduction offset a portion of the revenue decline resulting in an adjusted EBITDA loss of $231 million. Fully diluted GAAP loss per share was $4.99, a decline of $7.10 primarily due to the lower attendance in our parks. We are making significant efforts to ensure the continued loyalty of our Active Pass Base. We extended the use of all 2020 season passes through the end of 2021. For our members, we added an additional month to their membership for every month they paid when their home park was closed. We are also rolling out a gift card option in the second quarter that members can choose to use in our parks in lieu of adding additional months to their membership.

Finally, all members have the option to pause their membership payments at any time through spring 2021. However, we have offered a menu of benefits including upgrades to higher membership tiers if they elect to continue on their normal payment schedule. As of today, only about 20% of current members have chosen to pause their membership. We anticipate that most of these paused members will return to active paying members once we reopen our remaining parks.

We are pleased with the retention of our very large Active Pass Base, which included 1.7 million members and 2.1 million season pass holders at the end of 2020. Our Active Pass Base was approximately flat compared to the end of the third quarter 2020 when we had 1.9 million members and 1.9 million season pass holders. Our Active Pass Base at the end of 2020 is down 51% compared to the end of 2019. While this is a significant decline, it is important to assess this in proper context. This decline is almost entirely due to lower sales of new season passes and memberships during 2020 as they were difficult to sell with so much uncertainty during the pandemic.

We also did not hold our usual pass sales events including our flash sale in September, which contribute significantly to our year-end Active Pass Base. That being said, because we extended our 2020 season passes through the end of 2021, our Active Pass Base, as of today, is down less than 10% versus the same day last year, which preceded the pandemic’s impact. We believe this represents a more meaningful comparison for our Active Pass Base heading into the 2021 operating season as we believe the season pass holders and members who were extended will visit our parks in 2021. Looking ahead, we expect the Active Pass Base trends to continue to improve as we start selling more new passes and memberships.

Deferred revenue as of December 31, 2020 was $205 million, up $61 million or 42% to prior year as we expect to recognize most of this deferred revenue in 2021. The increase was primarily due to the deferral of revenue from members and season pass holders whose benefits were extended through 2021, partially offset by lower new season pass and membership sales.

Total capital expenditures for the year were $98 million, a reduction of 30% from 2019. We expect our 2021 capital spend to be slightly lower than 2020 due to the carryover of new rides that were delivered and paid for, but not commissioned in 2020.

Our liquidity position, as of December 31, was $618 million. This included $460 million of available revolver capacity, net of $21 million of letters of credit and $158 billion of cash. This compares to a liquidity position of $673 million as of September 30, 2020.

Net cash outflow for the quarter was $56 million, representing an average of $19 million per month. As a reminder, our net cash outflow in the fourth quarter included partnership park distributions that represented an average of $7 million per month. Our fourth quarter cash flow benefited by $8 million from the sale of some excess land in New Jersey, which was not in our prior estimates. Without the landfill, our net cash outflow was $21 million per month, an improvement from our prior estimates of $25 million to $30 million.

We historically experienced significant cash outflow in the first quarter of the year as the majority of our parks are closed, yet, we incurred an elevated operating and capital expenditures to prepare for our parks opening in the spring. We estimate that our net cash outflow in the first quarter of 2021 will be higher than normal or approximately $53 million to $58 million per month. This is primarily due to three things. First, the normal seasonality of our business. Second, the timing of interest payments on our newly issued $725 million of senior secured debt. And, third, the pandemic-related limitations on our parks, including our California and Mexico parks that typically have year round operations.

We are striving to be cash flow positive for the balance of the year but this is largely dependent upon all our parks opening and attendance levels continuing to normalize.

I would now like to give you an update on the progress of our transformation plan. The headline is this. We are on track with our plan and we are highly confident in our ability to achieve our objectives. Executing the transformation plan will require one-time cost of approximately $70 million through 2021, including $60 million of cash and $10 million of non-cash write-offs. So far, $35 million has been incurred through the end of 2020, including the non-cash write-offs of $10 million. We expect to incur the remaining $35 million by the end of 2021. Approximately two-thirds of the spending in 2021 is related to investments in technology, beginning with the implementation of a state-of-the art CRM system.

We expect the transformation plan to unlock $80 million to $110 million in incremental annual run rate EBITDA once fully implemented and the company is now operating in a normal business environment. In 2021, we expect to achieve $30 million to $35 million from our organization redesign and other fixed cost reductions. In January alone, we realized more than $2 million of fixed cost value due to transformation, so we are well on track to achieve our estimated savings for 2021. We expect to ramp up to the full amount of benefits as attendance grows to 2019 levels.

We have already completed significant portions of the work that will benefit us in 2021 starting with our three cost initiatives. First, as we announced last fall, we reduced our full time headcount costs by approximately 10%. We are piloting new approaches to recruiting and training and moving to centralize some of our back office operations, such as finance, human resources and IT. Second, from a non-headcount cost perspective, we closed offices in New York City and West Hollywood and are in the midst of driving savings through centralized negotiations with a number of our vendors. Initial results are validating the projected value opportunities of these initiatives. Third, from a variable labor perspective, we are piloting our park level labor model, which will allow us to dynamically match stuffing with attendance levels throughout the day. We are conducting this pilot in our Texas parks and plan to roll it out to our remaining parks once we validate that the model is working effectively. We will realize the benefits of the model as attendance levels rise and we will keep you updated as our parks continue to open.

We are also making excellent progress on our revenue initiatives. Specifically, we are testing our new and improved menu assortment, pricing and merchandising strategy in Over Texas and Fiesta Texas. We expect to expand these initiatives to all other parks once they reopen. Our marketing team and media agency have incorporated the use of our media ROI tool and we plan to measure our ROI by park in the future. We continue to improve our website, which we rolled out last fall. We will soon make it available for our parks in Mexico and Canada.

Finally, we continue to make progress with our initiative to bring back single-day visitors, particularly those living far away enough from our parks where a season pass is not an attractive option. While we always prefer to sell a season pass or a membership because of the highest full season revenue, we believe there is a significant opportunity to capture additional attendance by targeting single-day visitors. We are already seeing a positive impact on our attendance and per caps as a result of this initiative.

As we announced last December, we are changing our method of determining our fiscal quarters and fiscal years, such that each fiscal quarter shall consist of 13 consecutive weeks ending on a Sunday. Each fiscal year shall consist of 52 weeks or 53 weeks and shall end on the Sunday closest to December 31. During the years when there are 53 weeks, the fourth quarter shall consist of 14 weeks. Because of this change, our first fiscal quarter of 2021 will end on April 4 instead of March 31 and the current fiscal year will end on January 2, 2022. The purpose of this change is to align our reporting calendar with how we operate our business and to improve comparability across periods.

Looking ahead, the operating environment remains unpredictable. So it’s difficult to project beyond the next three months. For that reason, we are not providing annual guidance at this time. We have announced opening dates for all our parks that are not already open with start dates beginning in March. That being said, we will remain flexible and we’ll be cautious to commit our capital, media and labor dollars only when we believe there will be a strong ROI.

We are extremely encouraged by the improvements in our attendance trends in the face of the pandemic, and we are very excited about the value creation that will come from implementing our transformation plan. We have more work to do, but I’m pleased by our progress so far. The whole company is intently focused on executing the transformation plan over the coming quarters.

Now, I will pass the call back over to Mike who will tell you more about our strategy.

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Sandeep. Our strategy is to drive profit from our core business because this will create sustainable value over time. We can grow our business from its core because we operate in a healthy industry that is benefiting from long-term secular trends as consumers increasingly choose to spend on experiences over objects. Even within out-of-home entertainment, regional theme parks are a compelling sector because they enjoy high recurring cash flow that has proven to be extremely resilient during downturns. These attributes have enabled our industry and our company to deliver strong revenue and earnings growth over time.

However, over the past few years, we did not evolve at the same pace as our guest expectations. As a result, we underperformed the industry from both a top-line and bottom-line perspective. To reinvigorate profitable growth, our team has reassessed every aspect of our business. We have developed an updated strategy to ensure that we constantly evolve so we not only meet but exceed our guests’ expectations, both now and for many years to come.

So here it is. Our strategy is to create thrilling memorable experiences at our regional parks delivered by a diverse and empowered team through industry-leading innovation and technology. Our vision is to be the preferred regional destination for entertainment and our mission is to create fun and thrilling memories for all. Our core values prioritize safety and the guest experience and drive accountability throughout the organization. Our values will result in a guest-centric culture; a commitment to prioritize the guest at every decision point.

Looking to the future, three key long-term focus areas will drive our strategy. First, modernizing the guest experience through technology; second, continuously improving operational efficiency; and third, driving financial excellence. For each of these focus areas, we will measure our progress based on certain key performance indicators.

For our first focus area, modernizing the guest experience through technology, our goal is to create a seamless and improved in-park experience with new applications of technology. First, we will provide opportunities for our guests to tailor the in-park experience to each of their individual preferences. Second, we will decrease wait times wherever possible, especially for our roller coasters where we are testing several virtual queuing and reservation systems. Third, we will facilitate our guests’ ability and desire to share their experience on social media. Finally, we will improve food and beverage quality and the overall appearance of our parks. In everything we do, we will prioritize the guest experience.

Here are a few highlights of our progress on this focus area thus far. Website redesign; our new simplified website has made it easier than ever for guests to find information about our offerings and to purchase tickets. This has led to higher sales conversion rates and higher per caps.

Customer relationship management; we are in the midst of developing a new CRM platform that will allow us to understand and predict our guests’ preferences from the moment they visit our website to the moment they leave the park. Based on this consumer data, we will begin tailoring our offerings to their preferences and customize their experiences so they get exactly what they want when they want it.

Contactless security; our guests no longer have to wait in long lines or have their bags searched to enter our parks. They now walk seamlessly through our contactless security systems which scans them for anything unsafe and also measures their temperature to ensure safe environment.

Cash card kiosks; our domestic parks that opened for normal operations in the fourth quarter have offered any guests who only have cash the ability to obtain cash cards from kiosks throughout the parks in order to facilitate electronic transactions. This improves hygiene within our parks, while also speeding up transactions and eliminating cash handling costs.

Mobile dining; our guests no longer have to wait in long lines to order food. Instead they can choose to order on their smartphones and pick up their food when it is ready. Mobile dining has also led to higher average checks.

For this first focus area of modernizing the guest experience through technology, the key performance indicators will be attendance and revenue.

Moving on to our second focus area; continuously improving operational efficiency, we will deliver products and services in a more cost-efficient manner, including effectively deploying park-level labor, leveraging our scale of increased purchasing power and optimizing our ride portfolio. We are also focused on increased guest throughput on our rides, as well as our food and beverage locations. As Sandeep mentioned, we have moved quickly to streamline our organization and reduced other fixed costs and we expect to realize $30 million to $35 million of fixed cost savings in 2021.

For the second focus area; continuously improving operational efficiency, the key performance indicator will be operating expense ratio, which is the ratio of our operating expenses relative to our revenue. We will begin to measure this ratio once we return to a more normal business environment.

Finally, our third focus area is driving financial excellence. We expect our transformation initiatives to create a new adjusted EBITDA baseline of $530 million to $560 million once our plan is implemented and we are operating in a more normal business environment. After we achieve this baseline, we believe our strategy will allow us to grow revenue at low-to-mid single-digits, in line with the overall out-of-home entertainment industry. Combined with our annual productivity initiatives, we will continue to invest back in our parks and improve margins to accelerate annual adjusted EBITDA growth to a range of mid-to-high single-digits. In addition, we will be disciplined in the way we allocate capital to ensure we deliver sustainable earnings growth.

We have developed the following capital allocation priorities to guide our path toward financial excellence. First, invest in our base business to facilitate profitable and sustainable growth. this includes investments in our park infrastructure, in technology for our parks, and in systems that help us oversee our park operations. This also includes investments in new rides and attractions, as well as other in-park offerings such as food and beverage. We expect to maintain our annual capital expenditures at 9% to 10% of revenue. Second, use free cash flow to pay down debt and return our net leverage ratio to between 3 and 4 times. Third, once we are within our targeted leverage range, consider strategic acquisition opportunities to further build our regional network of parks. Finally, if there are no acquisition opportunities that meet our strategic and financial return thresholds, we will return excess cash flow to shareholders via dividends or share repurchases.

For this third focus area of driving financial excellence, the key performance indicator will be adjusted EBITDA. We have a resilient team and a resilient business. Our team’s focus for 2021 is to safely open all of our parks and ensure that we successfully execute our transformation plan.

I look forward to updating you on our continued progress in the months ahead.

Catherine, at this point, can you please open the call for any questions?

Questions and Answers:

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Your first question comes from the line of Steve Wieczynski with Stifel.

Steve Wieczynski — Stifel — Analyst

Hey, guys, good morning. So, Mike, I guess, first of all, when you guys talk about becoming potentially cash flow positive over the last nine months, can you help us understand maybe what is going into making that statement? I guess what I’m trying to get at here is, is that assuming kind of park operations are — everything is basically up and running and still running at some kind of capacity restraint or are there other things that’s kind of embedded in there?

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Steve, how are you doing? Good morning to you. And I’ll take the first part of it and Sandeep can go from there. I think the first thing is we are seeing consistent and continued improving signs of pent-up demand across all the geographies and we’re ready to operate all of our parks starting in the spring of 2021. As far as right now, which parks are open and not open that go into that, as we saw last week, we got the green light to open up our water park in Mexico, Oaxtepec, February 27 and we got the green light in New York as well. We are still working collaboratively through California, Massachusetts, Illinois and Mexico and Montreal. But remember, it’s a volatile environment as far as where we’re at and we continue to work with the cities and states.

Sandeep has been clear in the past that the assumptions to get to cash flow neutral assumes that we’re roughly at about a 65 to 75 index to 2019 attendance levels. And that’s the guard rail. But again, we’ll continue to keep you posted. So Sandeep anything there I missed?

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, I think just to be clear on the assumptions. What we’re saying is, once we get past Q1, for the remaining nine months, we are looking to be cash flow positive. It’s to, definitely an extent, dependent on the park opening schedule. We’re ready to open in spring 2021. It’s more a question of getting authorization. And I think if you go back to look at our historical cash flows, the second quarter and the third quarter typically are significant cash generators and if you think back to what happened last year, especially the second quarter and third quarter, we didn’t really have that much of attendance because of the closure for the most part of the second quarter and limited operations in the third quarter. So I think, yeah, it is dependent for sure on the opening cadence, but I think we feel that we can get to positive cash flows if it actually works to what we’re expecting.

Steve Wieczynski — Stifel — Analyst

Okay, got you. Thanks, guys. And then second question, Mike and Sandeep, you guys saw a nice uptick in the fourth quarter in terms of the single-day guest, so to speak, and I’m just wondering, do you have any more data from — meaning, from where did those folks come from? And I guess what I’m trying to get at here is, are these folks that were potentially on a path before and dropped off the paths or are these folks that essentially have never even really visited one of your parks before?

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, I think on this one, Steve, we are extremely pleased on the single-day ticket strength that we actually have been seeing. And it’s actually not just the fourth quarter. If you go back to Jan, Feb of 2020 before the pandemic hit, we were already seeing significant single-day ticket improvement in terms of penetration and growth. We were up 38%, I think, in the first couple of months of 2020. And I think, historically, we’ve actually probably in the last few years, lost a bit of traction on single-day tickets and this has been an initiative that we actually looked to embrace in the early part of 2020. And, in fact, when we went and talked about the transformation plan back in October, we identified the pricing and promotion initiative as one of our key prongs, and this is a key component of it, because we are looking to drive a mix improvement in our portfolio, but it’s an and, it is not an or.

So these single-day ticket guests are intended to be incremental to the Active Pass Base that we have and I think we feel very pleased that we’re getting traction on this — on the single-day tickets side and what’s really good is, we are actually pleased about our Active Pass Base because we’ve been able to retain — our Q3 to Q4 was relatively flat. And frankly, going back to Q2, Q2 was relatively flat with Q3. So it’s been pretty consistent over the six-month period in terms of the Active Pass Base in total. There has been a bit of a trade between members and season pass holders.

But overall, we’re really pleased about it and in the prepared remarks, I told you, because we extended the season pass holders from 2020 to the end of 2021, given the pandemic, if we look at it today, we’re actually down less than double-digits on the Active Pass base and these season pass holders and members who have been given extensions are going to come and visit our parks and they will definitely drive attendance, and in addition to that, incremental revenue on in-park spend, depending on the type of [Indecipherable]. So overall we feel really good about the single-day ticket attendance being incremental to the Active Pass Base and accretive to our overall attendance long term.

Steve Wieczynski — Stifel — Analyst

Okay, great, thanks, guys. Appreciate it.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of David Katz with Jefferies.

David Katz — Jeffries — Analyst

Morning, everyone.

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Morning.

David Katz — Jeffries — Analyst

And thanks for all of the detail. When we look forward to this notional or aspirational kind of normal year again, that we all wish for, that you’re basing the $530 million to $560 million EBITDA on, can you talk about the mix of membership/pass members coupled with kind of the spend per capita and how you’re assuming that mix evolves within that kind of $530 million to $560 million, please? Because we can sort of think out loud both ways where perhaps there is less growth in the pass base or membership base and more of it coming from the spend per capita or we could probably argue with the other way too.

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

David, great question and I think if you think back to what I just talked about in the earlier answer on single-day ticket penetration in the Active Pass Base, look, I mean, our per caps have been extremely strong as we’ve gone through this past year and the fourth quarter in particular and I think as you have been seeing the sequential acceleration in the per caps within Q3 and Q4, it was driven by a few things. One is, our members on core parks with 12-month commitment period contributed definitely to those admissions per caps growing. In addition, the single-day ticket holders contributed to the growth in per caps. The single-day ticket holders actually spend more per visit in the parks when they come in. So all of that actually contributed to the per cap increase.

However, we do have a good strong retention of the Active Pass Base and I think what we are looking for is the and not the or. So we want to basically layer these single-day tickets on top of the Active Pass Base and as we move into the normal operating seasons, we would like to actually rebuild the Active Pass Base as we go through the year to have a much more balanced approach between single-day ticket and Active Pass Base. It’s not trading of one for the other, it’s just that I think we were further behind on single-day tickets and so the growth was actually a bit higher in the initial phases, but over time, it should be very balanced. And so the revenue mix that should come from that should reflect that balance and the per caps will adjust accordingly.

David Katz — Jeffries — Analyst

And if I can follow that up, right, with what Mike laid out is sort of a flow-through of 1 to 1.5 times growth on that mid single-digit top-line. How does the evolving mix sort of slide the outcome, right, the profit outcome within that? Presumably the more single-day visitors you have, the closer you can get to the top end of that range. Is that a fair assumption?

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, I would say that — let me just step back a little bit, David, and just say that overall, we’ve been talking about mid-to-high single-digit improvements in EBITDA growth. It is based on productivity improvements, which include elements of the cost structure that we are investing in, as well as the revenue growth levers. And so what I would say is the mix impact is part of our revenue growth plans and so it’s embedded, but I wouldn’t necessarily say that it’s going to hurt us or help us one way or the other. The key is to maintain the balance at all times and we will continuously evaluate if the balance is out of kilter and push one side or the other a little bit more.

But the key over here is we’re looking to make sure that we deliver the option the guest looks for because we can look at both our pricing and promotions approach on the transformation initiative to understand if they are more inclined to go for a single-day ticket because of the cohort they belong to, like Mike described. And — or if they want to basically trade up and buy a season pass or a membership and that balance is something we’ll continuously reevaluate. As part of the transformation, we’ve invested in this revenue management team that is now in place and you have seen the results, you’ve actually seen the results in Q4, there’s more of it that should come as we continue down this year.

David Katz — Jeffries — Analyst

Perfect, thank you, all.

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thank you.

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, David.

Operator

Your next question comes from James Hardiman with Wedbush Securities.

James Hardiman — Wedbush Securities — Analyst

Hey, good morning, guys. Really appreciate all the color, particularly, with respect to the longer term outlook, the longer term plan, obviously, we’re in the midst of some pretty unprecedented disruption. But I wanted to continue down this path of what things look like sort of post-pandemic, particularly, on the capital priority side. As you sort of laid out your priorities, it seems like M&A is a higher priority than dividends and share repurchases. Maybe just help us think about why that’s the case. Are you seeing — do you believe that they are better returns sort of in a post-pandemic environment on M&A than dividends and share repos? And then the previous management team obviously had a pretty well-defined strategy for acquiring small parks, water parks, specifically, at the local level. Do you see your M&A strategy as a continuation of that or something that’s new and different in some way?

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Well, good morning, James. What I would start with is our focus is on our core business and that’s the focus. We want to absolutely leverage transformation to drive real operational effectiveness in our core business and I start there. Second, on M&A, as you know, it’s always been our policy not to comment on that topic, but I want to go to your question as well is we — as we said in our prepared remarks, our first priority, consistent with transformation and our focus on the core business and delivering sustainable value creation there, is to invest in the base business to facilitate profitable sustainable growth out of rides, attractions, other in-park areas. That is absolutely going to be the focus. Second is to use that free cash flow to pay down the debt, get that net leverage ratio to between 3 and 4. And then we’ll consider opportunities on the M&A front and any excess cash will definitely return in terms of dividends and share repurchases. We’re always going to look at the return aspect, but that is the priority. But I think everybody should take away, the focus is the base business here.

James Hardiman — Wedbush Securities — Analyst

I definitely get that. I guess to the question of the previous water park acquisition strategy, is that sort of something we should think about as the previous management team and not continued under your leadership?

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

No, what I would say is we’ve been clear on this, I think with any M&A, it’s always going to be about, is it strategically relevant? Does it deliver shareholder value? And do we think we have the capability and capacity to deal with it? And I think we’re going to look at anything in that framework.

James Hardiman — Wedbush Securities — Analyst

Got it. And then my second question. I wanted to talk about wages, which are obviously an important topic, just given the momentum that a federal minimum wage seems to be gaining here, who knows, obviously, that wouldn’t — presumably wouldn’t happen over overnight, if at all. But just curious where you stand in terms of sort of a weighted average basis in terms of your associates at your parks. And maybe as I think about this $530 million to $560 million baseline EBITDA number, sort of what’s assumed in there? Is there potentially some downside if we do see a ramping up of the minimum wage? Thanks.

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Sure, sure. Yeah, it’s a really good question, James. Let me start with this is clearly an area that we’ve been focused on in managing for quite some time. As you remember in our earnings baseline, as part of our 2020 earnings guidance prior to COVID, we already reflected minimum wage risk in seven states, which was about approximately $20 million. And so we know and we knew that was an issue, we got ahead of it. So that’s why our second strategic focus area is about continuously improving our operating efficiencies. It’s a major part of the strategy. Now we also believe conversely, there is going to be potentially bigger labor pools out there as well because there is a higher unemployment rate, but I think the last thing I would say on this is, that’s the whole reason we engaged on park-level labor as part of transformation. We knew we had to get ahead of this. So we’re going to continue to monitor it and stay close to the states, but we do think we got the right tools in place with transformation and we also think that our earnings baseline before the pandemic reflected that. Sandeep anything I missed there? Apparently not. So, pick the next question, who’s next in the queue. And one question please, just because I know we’ve got a number of other folks in the queue.

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Sorry, Mike, I actually have been on mute. Just to answer the question that you asked specifically, James, on what’s assumed in our EBITDA goal of $530 million to $560 million, we have assumed both the headwind from minimum wage and also the offset from productivity gains from the park-level labor model that Mike just talked about. So that is already assumed in our EBITDA goals.

James Hardiman — Wedbush Securities — Analyst

Got it. Thanks, Mike. Thanks, Sandeep.

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, James.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Tyler Batory with Janney.

Tyler Batory — Janney Capital — Analyst

Good morning. Thank you. I wanted to circle back on pent-up demand, specifically this year. And in the prepared remarks, you cited some guest survey data but just interested if you can give us a better sense of what indicators you’re looking at that’s informing your opinions on pent-up demand for the second half of this year, whether it’s group bookings or the pass sales. Just trying to get a sense of what’s most important there and what those indicators are telling you about what demand might look like in the summer season.

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, good morning, Tyler. I hope you’re well. So I’d start with the broad umbrella of — I think it’s fantastic that as an industry and we at Six Flags have — we’ve entertained nearly 7 million guests and I believe that our safety protocols and standards have created a significant trust lever with our guests, both in terms of recruiting guests, as well as retaining. This gets to the single-day ticket and the retention of the Active Pass Base. So I’d start there because people feel confident in the safety umbrella we give them and I think that is a big deal for the industry and it’s a big deal for us in a positive way. Specifically, to your question, first, we’re seeing very consistent demand across all geographies, which I think, number one, is a really positive sign. Second, as Sandeep mentioned, we continue to see really good attendance trends from 35% in Q3 of 2019 to 51% in Q4 and similar levels year-to-date that includes what has been two weekends of tough weather in Texas. We’re also, as part of that, seeing guest satisfaction surveys now equal or better in our open parks in 2019. We think that’s a very good positive as guests are understanding the safety protocols.

The other item, obviously, is the resilient Active Pass Base. We think that’s a big positive that we’re roughly flat really from actually quarter two and we still have the opportunity with our Active Pass Base to revamp once we reopen up the parks. And then lastly, when we look at our surveys, I mentioned this on the last call, we’ve seen an improvement. As we’ve been surveying guests, we’ve seen that 97% of those surveyed want to visit in a COVID-free environment. Last call was approximately 93% and we’re seeing 96% of guests who are saying they want to visit immediately after taking a vaccine. And as part of that, we are seeing data that people want this close-to-home fun, safe experience and we are seeing data that says people do have more vacation days and they have saved up money, but they want to be able to enjoy it in a safe, fun, close-to-home experience.

And then we’ve also been watching the overseas parks as well. And we’ve seen some good trends there. So we’ll continue to monitor it. We stay close to our guests every week, but we’re ready to go. We’re ready to operate in 2021.

Tyler Batory — Janney Capital — Analyst

Okay, very good. I appreciate the color. I’ll leave it there. Thank you.

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Ian Zaffino with Oppenheimer.

Ian Zaffino — Oppenheimer — Analyst

Hey, great. I’ll kind of touch on that minimal wage question again on the revenue side, maybe just kind of give us an idea of what your demographics are as far as people who are showing up to the parks. Does a boost in minimum wage actually put more dollars into your visitors’ pockets or are you planning for just a higher demographic? Any type of color you could give there would be great.

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Ian, you’re right because I think to the extent that there is minimum wage increases in certain of our demographics where we operate, that has got a halo effect on the revenue side as well. I think we’ve talked about this in the past too. But that is a factor and I think that’s part of what plays into the assumptions that I talked about on the $530 million to $560 million adjusted EBITDA goal that we’ve articulated previously and reiterated today. So it’s all in there in the assumptions. The headwind on wage is definitely in there and it wasn’t there back when we guided for 2020. And also the assumptions of improving productivity are in there because of park-level labor. And on the revenue side, the assumptions include the assumptions of benefits from a more disposable income available in those demographics too. So it’s all in there and it’s embedded in the EBITDA goal of $530 million to $560 million.

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

And just quickly to add, I mean we’re roughly — specific, were roughly half teens and young adults, and roughly half families and children. And to Sandeep’s point, we think it absolutely helps in that regard, put more money in their pockets.

Ian Zaffino — Oppenheimer — Analyst

Okay, great, thank you very much.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Eric Wold with B. Riley.

Eric Wold — B.Riley FBR Capital Markets and Co. — Analyst

Thank you and good morning. I know obviously from the way you talked about today, you’re focused on the core business, improving base and operations and getting those ramped back up. But can you maybe provide just an update as to where you are with potentially restarting the China park development? Have you been in discussion with any potential new partners there since that fell out a year or so ago? And is there a timetable as to kind of when you would want to get that restarted or potentially it becomes maybe too late on that front?

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Morning, Eric. So we’ve been clear with this and I have stated this in the past, we obviously are — from an international standpoint, we are focused on Qiddiya in Saudi Arabia. And we are excited about the future there. And we do not anticipate any revenue or operations from China in ’21 or moving forward.

Eric Wold — B.Riley FBR Capital Markets and Co. — Analyst

Got it. Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Stephen Grambling with Goldman Sachs.

Stephen Grambling — Goldman Sachs — Analyst

Hey, good morning. Very quick follow-up on the transformation plan. I think last quarter you gave some big buckets on the fixed cost savings. Can you Just confirm the total amount of $40 million to $55 million hasn’t changed and what are the big buckets being achieved this year versus next?

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

So I think we talked about a $30 million to $35 million of value being achieved in 2021, which is consistent with what we said last time in October. And I think for what we’re expecting is the $40 million to $55 million is achieved in 2022. And I think that’s the fixed costs, independent of attendance. The total transformation value as we said was $80 million to $110 million with the remaining part of the $40 million to $55 million coming from a combination of the revenue initiatives that we outlined and the park-level labor initiatives that we talked about earlier as well. So, no change really in what we previously communicated. I think from a proof point standpoint, we’re just a month into the year and as I mentioned in the prepared remarks, we’ve already realized over $2 million in the first month of the year.

So we feel pretty well on track to getting the fixed cost savings that we’ve actually outlined for the year. And it’s really coming from a couple of major areas that we’ve outlined in the previous call, which was the org redesign, which we executed in Q4. And in addition to that we also have the procurement effort on non-headcount, which is going to be an additional element that’s going to drive it. So pretty confident of the $30 million to $35 million and we’re going to continue to update you every quarter as we go along on progress that we’re making.

Stephen Grambling — Goldman Sachs — Analyst

And so, just to be clear, it sounds like some of the park-level labor expenses like the system to better forecast attendance and labor needs, maybe that will evolve and be what kind of builds on this into next year.

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, you’re exactly right. So park-level labor is a variable component. So the $30 million to $35 million is fixed costs, independent of attendance. Right? So the park-level labor will flex based on the attendance and also based on when we implement it. The revenue initiatives should also be happening depending on where the attendance basically goes. So we’re going to basically update you on the fixed piece and the variable piece as time goes along. So you know how much of transformation value has been realized.

Stephen Grambling — Goldman Sachs — Analyst

Understood. Clear. Thank you.

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Okay.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Paul Golding with Macquarie Capital.

Paul Golding — Macquarie Capital — Analyst

Yeah. Thanks so much. Mike, you mentioned earlier in the call that you’re testing the virtual queuing and reservation system for some rides. I was wondering just what the outlook is on capacity this year, any limitations and, I guess as an indication of that, whether you’re going to maintain the reservation system to get through the front gate. And then I have a quick follow-up.

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, good morning, Paul. How are you? First, on your latter, we have the ability to continue the reservation system and we have used it where we’ve needed to use it based on local, state officials, as well as where we’ve been able to flow capacity and we’ve made decisions park-by-park, based on the local guard rails. As far as capacity in total, to your former question, first, we’re very confident. We have ample capacity to meet pent-up demand and satisfy our safety standards. Remember, the same thing I would stress again, is we’re outdoor, we’re spread over dozens to hundreds of usable acres which allows us to reach high levels versus our theoretical max capacity, while still satisfying social distancing.

And then the third, which you alluded to, when you look at our technology and safety protocols we put in place in 2020, it’s really allowed us to, even beyond the pandemic, control the flow capacity and safely increase throughputs. From the website to going through security, you are not even touched. And I think, lastly, just as a reminder, we only reach our max capacity on roughly a handful of days. So we average about 50% of theoretical max capacity on a pretty typical year. So all that combined with why we’re excited about the progress of vaccines, we feel very good about our capacity to meet that pent-up demand across all geographies. And, as I said, we’re ready to operate.

Paul Golding — Macquarie Capital — Analyst

Thanks for that color. And then just a quick follow-up on the earlier question around international. I know you were saying that you don’t expect to see anymore revenue or EBITDA to come from licensing in China. In parts of the world where maybe COVID wasn’t as protracted, do you still see an opportunity for maybe any new deals where the appetite for mass gatherings may be higher than it is currently in the States?

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Relative to — you mean in terms of pent-up demand or business opportunity? Just so I’m clear on your question, Paul.

Paul Golding — Macquarie Capital — Analyst

Yeah. Just business opportunities because we know that the China arrangement — that we shouldn’t expect to see anything further come from that. So I guess the question is maybe you…

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Got it.

Paul Golding — Macquarie Capital — Analyst

[Speech Overlap] opportunities or you’re still open to other opportunities since COVID was not as severe in some other parts of the world.

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. Very clear. What I would reinforce again is our focus is delivering profit from our core business. And again transformation is all about driving operational effectiveness of that core business, and that’s going to be our focus.

Paul Golding — Macquarie Capital — Analyst

Got it. Thanks so much, Mike, appreciate it.

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, you bet.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Alex Maroccia with Berenberg.

Alex Maroccia — Berenberg Capital Markets — Analyst

Hi, good morning, guys. Thanks for taking my questions. Based on some of the technology and park improvements you outlined, it sounds like many of these could be related to the pandemic or at least accelerated by it. And here, I’m talking about contactless security, mobile dining and the cash kiosks, all due to their hygienic benefits. How will you be measuring the return on the investments, both financially and then in terms of customer satisfaction going forward?

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Alex, I think it’s a really good point. What — I think, first, the pandemic helped us accelerate what we needed to do to be a more guest-centric culture. And as we looked at even the pre-pandemic, as I said in the last call, our guests love our parks, they love our roller coasters, they love our funnel cakes, they just want an easier experience and part of that is just modernizing that guest experience through technology, which is one of our key strategic focus areas. So our measure, our KPI is going to absolutely be attendance and revenue. As we look at that, it should — we should be seeing top-line momentum as we modernize the guest experience through technology and we will obviously continue to look at guest satisfaction surveys and other levels of guest feedbacks. So very consistent, as I said, albeit, attendance and revenue will be the key KPIs.

Alex Maroccia — Berenberg Capital Markets — Analyst

Right. That’s great. Thank you, Mike.

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Mike Swartz with Truist Securities.

Michael Swartz — Truist Securities — Analyst

Hey. Good morning, guys. Just maybe for Sandeep, I think you said that, in your prepared remarks, that each park that was open in 2019 was also open in the fourth quarter of 2020 and I may have missed it, but did you give us the operating days in the fourth quarter versus — of ’20 versus ’19?

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah…

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

So, Mike — sorry, go ahead.

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

I got it, Sandeep. So we’ve been focused on — obviously, on open parks. And as you know, not all operating days are created equal. The way you want to think about it for the fourth quarter is, first, for the days that the parks were open in 2020, comparable operations in 2019 represented approximately 70% of the 2019 total attendance. That was an increase from about 60% at the end of the third quarter. So we feel good about that. We think that’s also another sign of good pent-up demand. Remember, in those numbers, that includes Mexico. Mexico was open part of the quarter but we ended up closing it early. And it also includes the fact we have four additional parks that offer drive-through or walk-through Holiday in the Lights experiences and also the drive-through safari that was open for a portion of the quarter. So — and I think we’re also clear on — in the table — releases, but we had 18 parks, one water park in the Great Escape Lodge were open during that quarter.

Michael Swartz — Truist Securities — Analyst

Okay, that’s helpful. And is there maybe a way to think about that kind of comparable ops percentage for ’21 and maybe how that flows throughout the year? I know first quarter will be constrained but how does that look as we progress through the year?

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

It’s a good point. I mean, we’ve been — it’s, obviously, as Sandeep said, it’s really a volatile environment. And we’ve been very focused on open parks and getting the parks reopened in terms of that focus because we think that’s where it is. So our focus is about getting all the parks open by the spring of 2021 and that would be the guidance I would give you. That is the true north for us is to continue to leverage our safety protocols. We’re collaboratively in those places, we don’t have set dates and to get all the gates open to drive that positive performance, balance of the year.

Michael Swartz — Truist Securities — Analyst

Okay, great. And maybe just follow — sorry, go ahead, Sandeep.

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, just to add on. I think, obviously, once we get open especially across 2021, we should be going to normal operating schedules. So what you’ve seen historically is what you would expect to see if the parks are open. So that’s the objective.

Michael Swartz — Truist Securities — Analyst

Okay, that’s helpful. And maybe just related to that talk about marketing spend, the cadence of marketing spend and maybe how does your marketing strategy compare in 2021 relative to maybe when we were — had normal operations back in 2019?

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. And I think one of the things that we talked about is, we’re going to be very choiceful about how we deploy our media and which is the effect of the marketing spend that we’re incurring. And I think we’re just [Indecipherable] look at what is happening actually with the pandemic and the pandemic trajectory. So depending on when things become much more clear in terms of pent-up demand being leveraged in a much more significant way, we’ve historically done a lot of advertising and marketing around the time we actually sell our passes, and so that that typically has been done spring and fall. But I think in this year, we could look at it as spring, summer and fall and we will time our spend to make sure we are driving that demand and accelerate it.

Michael Swartz — Truist Securities — Analyst

Okay, great. Thank you.

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Sure.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Brett Andress with KeyBanc.

Brett Andress — KeyBanc Capital — Analyst

Hey, good morning. Just to be clear on the last point on the operating days. So assuming all of the parks open, how many operating days are you planning for right now compared to 2019? I mean, is this as simple as just taking a normal calendar, backing out 1Q and then maybe adding some of the extensions you talked about earlier? I’m just looking for kind of a ballpark, as you said today.

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, Brett, I would say, I’ll go back to the last part of what I answered on the calendar. So once we get past spring ’21 and we could reopen, go back to normal operating calendars starting Memorial Day, give or take, sometime in the second quarter. So that is what the expectation is. So if you go back and look at 2019, that should give you a pretty good indication of what the operating calendar would look like. The additional, the add-ons, I would say, that are incremental to that are the safari that became a stand-alone experience, some of the holiday events that we did, which were incremental. But I think that’s the way you would think about the operating calendar.

Brett Andress — KeyBanc Capital — Analyst

All right, thank you for the clarity.

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. And Brett, just the last thing I’d add. The reason, and we’ve been clear on this, is just they’re just not created equal as you know. So that’s why we’re not drilling into that as much as just focusing on the calendar of the parks.

Brett Andress — KeyBanc Capital — Analyst

Yeah, understood. Okay, thank you.

Operator

Your last question comes from the line of Ryan Sundby with William Blair.

Ryan Sundby — William Blair — Analyst

Yeah, hey, thanks for taking my question. Mike or Sandeep, just I guess to follow up a little bit on the last question. When you look at adding something like West Coast Customs Car Show at Magic Mountain or even just some of the way you’ve modified operations to do more drive-through or walk-through of the parks, has there been any change in view, I guess, internally on the kind of programing or types of activities your parks need to support it? I guess what I’m asking here is, just given some of the popularity, is there more demand for using the parks than you realized kind of pre-pandemic?

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Ryan, it’s a good question. I think what you’re seeing is a testament to how we have and will continue to lead innovation and that’s a driver of being the regional entertainment choice and it’s going to be — we’re going to always focus on our core assets and we’re going to focus on our core offerings and if our guests are looking for a product, we can bring it to them safely and it’s cash flow positive on a variable basis, we’re going to do it because we got a great set of team members that can do it. So we will continue to be innovative and listen and learn from our guests and that’s a big part of the guest-centric culture.

Ryan Sundby — William Blair — Analyst

Perfect, thanks, guys.

Operator

And there are no further questions at this time.

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Catherine. For everyone, again, I want to thank you for your continued support. Our guests are eagerly looking for a memorable experience that is fun, safe, convenient, affordable and close to home; something Six Flags is uniquely able to offer. Six Flags is truly the preferred regional destination for entertainment, creating fun and thrilling memories for all. Take care and please stay safe.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Duration: 74 minutes

Call participants:

Stephen R. Purtell — Senior Vice President, Investor Relations, Treasury and Strategy

Mike Spanos — President and Chief Executive Officer

Sandeep Reddy — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Steve Wieczynski — Stifel — Analyst

David Katz — Jeffries — Analyst

James Hardiman — Wedbush Securities — Analyst

Tyler Batory — Janney Capital — Analyst

Ian Zaffino — Oppenheimer — Analyst

Eric Wold — B.Riley FBR Capital Markets and Co. — Analyst

Stephen Grambling — Goldman Sachs — Analyst

Paul Golding — Macquarie Capital — Analyst

Alex Maroccia — Berenberg Capital Markets — Analyst

Michael Swartz — Truist Securities — Analyst

Brett Andress — KeyBanc Capital — Analyst

Ryan Sundby — William Blair — Analyst

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