It’s a good attitude because Jackson is the son supposed to get out. He was enlisted to play minor league baseball in New York. His father is willing to take the blame, but Ramirez (George Lopez), the Texas Ranger who stumbled upon the scene and also somehow doesn’t speak Spanish, suspects the cover-up. When he tries to arrest him, Jackson and his horse Sundance flee across the Rio Grande.

For a kid who grew up on a small ranch, Jackson is shockingly unable to survive, drink standing water, trust anyone he meets, and sleep in random barns along the way. It’s also a little hard to believe that he hasn’t even learned a word of Spanish in his 20 years, but maybe the filmmakers are just trying to work out the point of intolerance.

On his trip to nowhere, Jackson gets plenty of charity from strangers, including a wealthy rancher with a stunning daughter (Esmeralda Pimentel) who made him stay and work for a while. And he begins to understand that his neighbors across the border are also people and not harassment, chasing away with guns and hatred. Oh, and he’s also hunted by Gustavo and a local tough Luis (Andres Delgado).

“No Man’s Land” was written by Allyn and directed by his brother Conor. The Texas-born siblings wanted to make a film about hope even when “the world is growing apart” and “xenophobia and prejudice abound,” the director wrote in a statement. “No Man’s Land” is less about vengeance than empathy and atonement, but I’m not sure Jackson was the best focus. He’s a good looking kid who has a lot to learn, but also a little stupid and boring. He is neither a hero nor an antihero, he is just a victim of the increasingly improbable and sometimes downright silly conspiracy.