Florida has withdrawn from the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program. For people in central Florida who have been relying on that extra money, the future seems a little more uncertain was on leave and those waiting for the green light to get back to work. Other federal benefits will continue but will expire on September 6. For Ocoee’s 28-year-old Aaron Davison, who is a Universal on leave employee who found out the federal unemployment program, which brought in an additional $ 300 a week, will end next month, feared he didn’t want to see it again. “It will hit me and my family hard when we face the possibility and inevitably live our car again,” said Davison. His parents are disabled and his mother is terminally ill. He’s the only breadwinner, and they’ve been through so much. “Before the vacation and the pandemic, we had lost our home to foreclosure and were evicted just a few weeks before Christmas in late 2019,” Davison said. They lived in their car for months until the parks closed, then in hotels for over a year. “They still drove me to work every day so I could at least make paycheck to paycheck so we could at least have hot meals,” said Davison, saying, “It’s mean, it’s just mean,” said Paul Cox, chairman of one Union that represents approximately 3,000 backstage workers employed in the live entertainment industry in central Florida. “So it’s going to be an absolute disaster for our employees,” said Cox. They are skilled workers from fireworks at Disney World to live trade shows and concerts. As a tourism industry, will we feel the effects in Florida like our bread and butter? Cox says it will. “It will be a domino effect.” That will affect the hospitality industry, it will affect the retail industry, it will affect, affect, affect, affect, “said Cox.” It’s literally just pulling the carpet Among them, those who will be able to find work elsewhere are likely to look for work and leave the industry. “He says for those who are not so lucky, they might end up on the grocery lines again.

Florida has withdrawn from the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program.

For people in central Florida who have relied on that extra cash, the future seems a little more uncertain.

Connected: Florida will cut its $ 300 weekly unemployment benefit program

This is especially true for those who have been on vacation and are waiting for the green light to get back to work.

Other federal benefits will remain in place, but will expire on September 6th.

For 28-year-old Aaron Davison of Ocoee, who is a general-purpose worker on leave, fears that the federal unemployment program, which raised an additional $ 300 a week, would end next month was a fear he won’t experience again wanted.

“It will be hard for me and my family when we face the possibility and inevitable life in our car again,” said Davison.

His parents are disabled and his mother is terminally ill. He’s the only breadwinner, and they’ve been through so much.

“Before the vacation and the pandemic, we had lost our home to foreclosure and were evicted just a few weeks before Christmas in late 2019,” Davison said.

They lived in their car for months until the parks closed, then in hotels for over a year.

“They still drove me to work every day so I could at least make paycheck to paycheck so we could at least have hot meals,” Davison said.

“It’s mean, it’s just mean,” said Paul Cox, chairman of a union that represents about 3,000 backstage workers in the live entertainment industry in central Florida.

“So it’s going to be an absolute disaster for our employees,” said Cox.

They are skilled workers from fireworks at Disney World to live trade shows and concerts.

As the tourism industry, as our bread and butter, will we feel the effects of this in Florida?

Cox says it will be a domino effect.

“It’s going to affect the restaurant industry, it’s going to affect retailing, it’s going to affect, affect, affect, affect,” said Cox.

“It’s literally just about pulling the rug out from under them. Those who can find work elsewhere are likely to look for work and leave the industry.”

He says for those who are not so lucky, they might end up back on the food lines.