Publisher’s Note:The Chronicle is working to help local businesses suffering from the effects of the spread of the COVID-19 virus and related government orders to close or restrict trade. Each issue of The Chronicle and at will feature a feature on a local business chronline.com move forward. To be considered, send an email to the newsroom at news@chronline.com. In addition, The Chronicle will continue to offer its coverage of the coronavirus and its impact across the community, state, and nation outside of our paywall chronline.com.

After nearly a year of closure, the King Street Cove performance center in Centralia was alive last Thursday with the music of local musicians as the cove is 25% busy, according to state entertainment restrictions.

King Street Cove’s owner Jamie Kaiser bought the former synagogue, which was built in the 1930s, with the aim of restoring the old building and creating a place for local musicians to showcase their talents.

The entertainment venue provides musicians with a place to perform with quality sound and lighting equipment.

“My real passion is supporting musicians, so I do sound and light. They spend their entire lives sitting on the edge of the bed and practicing, and I believe my goal is to honor them for the practice and the dedication they have put in, “Kaiser said.

Renovations to the music venues were completed in late 2019 to early 2020, but the bay had to close shortly afterwards due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Last week we had about 22 people here and it was great … it’s kind of an open mic until we get some steam,” Kaiser said.

There are many professional musicians who have chosen King Street Cove because it’s a place that is much more conducive to live performance than a bar environment, Kaiser said.

“When you’re trying to sing a song that you wrote and there are darts and pool tables, people screaming and playing soccer games, we’re trying to create a nice music environment where people can sit back and enjoy and have a glass of it can wine, ”said Kaiser.

Kaiser is getting on the shows as COVID-19 restrictions allow and hopes to have live entertainment on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays and to show movies on Sundays.

There is no fee for the Thursday night shows, but there is a donation box to support the musicians.

Tickets will go on sale when the bay is full of concerts.

“I like it when people show their talents, whatever they are – poetry, reading or singing. We had people come and paint pictures while people sing, just to show their art, ”Kaiser said.

King Street Cove seats approximately 150 people upstairs at full capacity. There is also a cafe on the ground floor that serves drinks during the shows. The cafe will eventually serve food as COVID-19 restrictions relax and proper approvals from the Department of Health are sought.

Kaiser said the bay is always open to partnering with the Fox Theater for entertainment. The two venues joined forces late last year to host live streaming concerts in support of local entertainment professionals, but had to postpone the event due to stricter COVID-19 restrictions put in place in December.

Scott Stolarz, executive director of the Fox Theater, said the live streaming concerts will be postponed for some time in March.

“The aim of these live streaming concerts is to support the creative industries and give musicians the opportunity to perform and to supplement some of the loss of income from the shows that did not take place last year,” said Stolarz.

More information on the upcoming live streaming concerts will be announced early next week, Stolarz said. King Street Cove will continue to host open mic events on Thursday evening at 7 p.m. and will post announcements of additional events on their Facebook page @kingstreetcoveWA.

King Street Cove is located at 200 S. King St. in Centralia.